‘Transformational trip’ focuses on human rights-based development

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Doug Mouncey says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Koshy Mathews says: Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments are closed. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 April 10, 2013 at 11:59 pm Our mission group from Saint Peter’s Episcopal Church in Phoenixville, PA has been going to El Salvador for the last five years under the direction of Cristosal Foundation. Our members find these trips to be truly transformational and mutually beneficial as they help us build relationship with people across the border breaking social, political, economic, linguistic and ethnic barriers. We are going back to El Salvador this summer with another group from Trinity Episcopal Church in Princeton, New Jersey. It is our hope that we can visit the El Carmen community in the Baja Lomba region this time. We thank Cristosal Foundation and their staff for helping these types of transformational trips possible. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR ‘Transformational trip’ focuses on human rights-based development April 11, 2013 at 6:08 am As a member of the Cristosal Board, thanks Lynette for this wonderful story and to our entire team and the people of El Salvador for your welcome of all of our transformational trips. People could visit our Foundation Cristosal web site to learn about organizing a similar trip. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET April 10, 2013 at 11:06 pm Congratulations to this group of young people for their pilgrimage ans especially for their solidarity with the Salvadoran people. It was good to provide the pump, but transformative to become in relationship with the people of El Carmen. They are truly special people as are all the people I have met in El Salvador. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 David Starr says: Comments (3) Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA center_img By Lynette WilsonPosted Apr 10, 2013 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA An ecumenical group from Anacortes, Washington, spent March 29-April 5 in El Salvador learning about Foundation Cristosal’s human rights-based approach to community development on a “transformational trip” organized and facilitated by the organization. ENS Photo/Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service – San Salvador, El Salvador] Without a skilled driver and a four-wheel-drive pickup, visitors can reach El Carmen in El Salvador’s Bajo Lempa region only on foot or horseback.Yet for a group of nine Episcopalians, Lutherans and one Roman Catholic from Anacortes, Washington, recently visiting the Central American country, the isolated village of El Carmen was the main destination. On Easter, they huddled in the bed of a compact, red Nissan pickup and held on to the roll bar and to each other while the driver dodged cattle, washouts, rivers and ruts. They sheltered their heads with hats against the midday sun, and those lucky enough to have handkerchiefs covered their faces with them to filter the dust.El Carmen is one of four communities – and one of two in the Bajo Lempa, or the lower Lempa River delta – served by Foundation Cristosal, a human rights-based community development organization with roots in the Anglican and Episcopal churches. The group – four adults and five youth – spent March 29-April 5 in El Salvador learning about Cristosal’s human rights-based approach to community development on a “transformational trip” organized and facilitated by the organization.“[With] traditional mission trips, mission often involves groups of foreigners coming down to do some ‘project’ and help in some way, even if they might have limited knowledge about the country and the people they are serving,” said Olivia Amadon, trips coordinator. “But at Cristosal, we believe that the first step in the process of development is to learn about the country and the people whom we are serving and to learn not only what their needs are but what their assets and desires are.”“The trips are often only the first step in ‘helping’ or ‘development’ because relationships are formed,” she said. “And our goal is that people will continue to maintain those relationships with the communities and Cristosal.”In 2010, the ecumenical group entered into a relationship with El Carmen when its youth group raised money to buy the community a new water pump, intended to push spring water up a 90-meter incline into the homes of 26 families. Over the last three years, the group has sold herbs, potted plants and blackberry jam and hosted dinners to help finance this year’s trip to El Salvador. On March 31, group members made it to El Carmen. While meeting with community members, they quickly learned that treating the symptom often doesn’t address the underlying problem.Rev. Carol Rodin, from Christ Episcopal Church in Anacortes, Washington, walks down the steep path to see the water pump in El Carmen. ENS Photo/Lynette Wilson“Just because we provided money for the pump doesn’t mean the problem is solved,” said the Rev. Carol Rodin, a transitional deacon from Christ Episcopal Church in Anacortes, who traveled to El Salvador with her daughter Mari, 17. “And we realize this is not the end. It’s good to hear about the problems so that we can work together to fix them.”The pump, community leaders said, doesn’t have the needed capacity. But the main problem lies in maintaining the pump that, not unlike the water system in El Salvador, has many moving parts.“It’s not only the pump, it’s administration. We’re helping them to develop the capacity to administer the system,” said Kenia Quintanilla Cruz, a lawyer and community organizer, during a meeting at Cristosal’s office in San Salvador.The community has established a water association to manage the system and collect funds from the community – 16 of 26 families are willing or can afford to pay. But when it comes to resolving mechanical issues and making funds available to fix or replacing parts, the association fails, Cruz said. Cristosal’s role is to provide the community with the fiduciary and maintenance skills and training necessary to manage the water system, she said.The water situation in El Carmen is not unique. More than 20 percent of El Salvador’s 6 million people don’t have access to water in their homes, with 60 percent of rural inhabitants affected. But that could change.After some six years of pressure from civil-society groups and nongovernmental organizations, a General Water Law was proposed in El Salvador’s General Assembly in March 2012. The law proposes that all Salvadorans have access to clean, plentiful water — a basic human right.In El Carmen, the water typically runs for two hours every four or five days when the pump is working, water association members told the visiting group. When it’s not working, the community hauls water in plastic canisters from a nearby river up the steep incline.“I see the people still struggling for basic human dignity and basic human rights,” said the Rev. Josefina Beecher, the former vicar of La Iglesia Episcopal de la Resurreccion in Mount Vernon, Washington, who lived in El Salvador from 1986 to 1994. She was happy to see small successes, such as a chicken farm in El Carmen that Cristosal and community members have partnered to build up, she said. “But I’m sad to see they are still fighting the same battles the war was fought over.”Between 1980 and 1992, a brutal civil war raged in El Salvador between the right-wing military regime and five guerilla groups organized as the Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberación Nacional, today the left’s FMLN political party. By official accounts, 75,000 people were killed. After the warring sides signed the United Nations-brokered Peace Accords in 1992, former guerilla fighters laid down their guns and began settling on unproductive lands, including El Carmen in the department, or state, of Usulután in western El Salvador.The 1980s were the darkest period in El Salvador’s history, said José Osvaldo López, a Cristosal lawyer, who was 10 in 1980. “The greatest number of human rights violations was taking place at a time when people were demanding their rights,” he said while speaking to the Washington group about human rights. “I was a boy when [Oscar] Romero was killed, and I couldn’t understand. He was untouchable. For me, well, everyone in this country regarded him as a saint. All he did was denounce injustices, and for that he was killed.”In this mural, on a wall in Mejicanos, a municipality adjacent to San Salvador, Oscar Romero is referred to as the “Saint of America.” For many Salvadorans, Romero was the “voice of the voiceless.” ENS Photo/Lynette WilsonRoman Catholic Archbishop Oscar A. Romero was martyred on March 24, 1980, when a gunman shot him in the heart while he celebrated a funeral Mass in the chapel on the grounds of a cancer hospital where he lived. Though he is not an official saint in the Roman Catholic Church, many Salvadorans view him as the “Saint of the Americas” and his assassination as the tipping point toward war. Romero and the Martyrs of El Salvador were added to the Episcopal Church calendar of commemorations in 2009 (General Convention Resolution A095).Throughout El Salvador’s civil war, and particularly in its aftermath, a culture of assistance and dependence has flourished in this, the smallest and most densely populated country in Central America, said Beecher, who is now retired and serves on Cristosal’s advisory board.Rather than contribute to a system that it believes perpetuates dependence, Cristosal prefers to invest in processes that seek to balance societal inequities.“El Salvador’s historical moment came with the signing of the 1992 Peace Accords, which opened the political process to all Salvadorans independent of their political ideology, race, gender, etc. But that was it,” said Noah F. Bullock, the executive director of Cristosal. “The peace accords didn’t address social and economic inequality,” he said. “They didn’t address many of the root causes of war. They simply said, ‘You can participate.’ So even though the peace accords offered political participation, the people entered a radically unequal political field.”Noah F. Bullock, executive director of Foundation Cristosal, talks with Andres Rosa Perez, one of the community leaders in El Carmen. ENS Photo/Lynette WilsonIn its approach to community development, Cristosal seeks to further the process set in motion by the accords by helping to empower El Salvador’s poor to act for justice and development as equal citizens in a democratic society. It promotes access to adequate housing, potable water, jobs and other economic opportunities, and the rule of law, which fall under the category of human rights often provided or promoted by governments in the developed world.Community leaders in El Carmen sitting next to the water pipes that carry spring water up a 90-meter incline into the homes of 26 families in El Carmen. ENS Photo/Lynette Wilson“Passing a [water] law won’t guarantee that the community has a functioning water system but it will be an important step toward establishing the right of citizens to clean water and the obligation on the state to preserve and protect water resources,” said Bullock, adding that the law is gaining support in the General Assembly.Besides supporting the water association and the chicken farm, whose success depends on access to water, Cristosal is working with community leaders to pressure local authorities to repair the road leading to El Carmen, a road the municipality is mandated by law to build. During the approaching rainy season that lasts from May to June, the road can become impassible, another potential glitch in getting the chickens to market. If successful, the chicken farm will create a stable economic initiative, providing jobs in a community in a country where 50 percent of the economically active population is under or unemployed, and 48 percent of Salvadorans live in absolute poverty.Before visiting El Carmen, the ecumenical group visited Los Calix, the second Bajo Lempa community that Cristosal serves, and participated in a five-hour Easter Vigil. In Los Calix, Cristosal is working with residents to build a mixed-use community center.Visit the“El Salvador Journey” blog for a full roundup and photos of stops the group made in El Salvador.Before arriving in El Salvador, the only other foreign country 14-year-old Christ Church member Kai Perschbacher had visited was Canada. His hometown of Anacortes sits midway between Seattle and Vancouver, British Columbia.“It’s a culture shock,” he said. “You look at pictures of Third World countries in National Geographic, but you don’t understand until you drive down these roads in the back of a pickup and see that people are living in poverty.”But, he added, you also see that it is possible to live with the bare necessities.Initially Mark Perschbacher, Kai’s father, thought it would be better to send money to El Salvador to invest in a project rather than visit. But he said he later realized that traveling to El Salvador would be a good way to teach the church’s youth group about how people live in other parts of the world. Despite the “bad wrap” El Salvador receives – it has one of the highest homicide rates in the world – he thought it would be OK to visit, he said.Sarah Hill and her daughters Grace and Zoe during a meeting with community members in El Carmen. ENS Photo/Lynette WilsonCelebration Lutheran Church member Sarah Hill anticipated that the trip would help instill in her daughters Zoe, 14, and Grace, 11, the importance of knowing how to work, manners, tolerance and the need to take ownership and responsibility for their actions.“When a family has means, it’s a challenge to raise a child that doesn’t feel entitled,” said Dr. Hill, a dentist. “That [entitlement] is incredibly prevalent in the United States.”Zoe Hill said she didn’t know what to expect in El Salvador. El Carmen was really rural, and “it gives you a shock,” she said. It’s beautiful, like the United States, but in a different way, she said.Getting off the plane, she worried that people wouldn’t accept her and would put her “in a box,” but that didn’t happen, she said. “Everyone has been welcoming.”Fifteen-year-old Will Sladich’s reflection on the poverty he’d witnessed in the Bajo Lempa was more existential.“It’s interesting that life goes on here whether we visit or not … all these people in these villages who we [Americans] would never know exist,” said Sladich, a member of Sacred Heart Church in La Conner, Washington.— Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. She currently is based in San Salvador, El Salvador.  Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

Western Louisiana: Bishop says Christians must ‘denounce this hate and…

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Posted Aug 14, 2017 Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Racial Justice & Reconciliation Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY [Huffington Post] The nation and the world watched in heartsick disbelief this weekend as white supremacists gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia. Waving Nazi flags and raising the Nazi salute, the mob could not have made its racist ideology clearer.Chillingly, the mob chanted “blood and soil,” a notorious catchphrase of the Third Reich. “Blood” refers to racial distinctions and asserts the superiority of whites over all others. Suppression of non-whites in a struggle for racial dominance is part of this distorted worldview.Read the full essay here.The Rt. Rev. Jake Owensby An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Western Louisiana: Bishop says Christians must ‘denounce this hate and violence’ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Charlottesville, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

Apopka Then and Now needs your help

first_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Please enter your comment! TAGSApopka Then and Now Previous articleWilcox withdraws from US Senate RaceNext articleSport Clips Haircuts: It’s Good to be a Guy in Apopka Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook groups serve a lot of purposes for communities. They can be a sounding board for issues. They can effect change. They can even win or lose elections. And in some cases, these groups can organize community action.However it is rare when a Facebook Group leaves its keyboards, PC’s and laptops and helps out its community in a more tangible, physical way and helps out in the community.  That’s what Apopka Then and Now is doing tomorrow.Gene Knight wrote this on Then and Now’s Facebook Group page today:“I have citizen of Apopka needing a back yard clean up… mainly grass mowed, small trees cut down etc. It’s just too much for one person to get back in shape. I’m looking to see if we can do it. It won’t be to bad if we get enough people to help. If you are able to help, please let me know. We will be serving lunch too. It’s just one way we would like to help citizens of Apopka in need. I know it’s short notice but it is what it is. It will be tomorrow starting at 8am.”Knight started the group in December of 2015, but since mid-April it has increased its membership from about 500 to over 2,000.  This small group, dedicated to the history of Apopka, has transformed into an all-encompassing group covering a diversity of issues.And now it is going into the community.“We are doing it because we want to help citizens in Apopka that are in need of help and to get the community involved to help make Apopka a great place to live,” said Knight. “If we can get everyone to help one person that just can’t get out and do yard work because of medical reasons or whatever the case may be, it will make a difference . I love getting out and doing what I can do in the community and just seeing people smile and know someone cares. I love helping people.”Misha Corbett agrees.“People helping each other is what builds a strong community, said Corbett, one of the administrators at Apopka Then and Now. ”And we want to build a strong community in Apopka.” The Anatomy of Fear LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Referee checks TMO twice for Chris Henry’s controversial try

first_imgMonday May 9, 2016 Referee checks TMO twice for Chris Henry’s controversial try Ulster sealed their place in the Guinness PRO12 Semi Finals for the fourth consecutive year following a crucial bonus point try scored by Ireland flanker Chris Henry. It was anything but a clear cut decision however, with the referee turning to his TMO twice to confirm it. Henry snuck through the bottom of a ruck, and as there is no offside line over the tryline, he was able to do that without being penalised. It wasn’t that simple though.The grounding was checked, but then after replays were shown around the stadium and the crowd kicked up a fuss, as well as Ospreys’ Dan Biggar, the referee felt compelled to check yet again.Veteran referee Derek Bevan confirmed that the ball was grounded correctly, and the try stood, much to the dismay of scrumhalf Rhys Webb, who probably should have controlled things better. “You take those ones, I guess. I thought I had control of the ball and it has happened to us a few times and the ball has just rolled over the try line and obviously it is open play then,” said Henry. “You definitely take it and I don’t think I have scored an easier one.”Ulster won the game 46-26 and will face Leinster in the semi final on May 20th.– Full highlights on page twocredit: the UAFCADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error See it to Believe it Related Articles 25 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Experts explain what actually happens… 26 WEEKS AGO WATCH: Leigh Halfpenny makes yet another… 26 WEEKS AGO Parisse alley-oop magic sets up brilliant… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s DeletedSecrets RevealedUrologists Stunned: Forget the Blue Pill, This “Fixes” Your EDSmart Life ReportsYou Won’t Believe What the World’s Most Beautiful Girl Looks Like TodayNueeyGranny Stuns Doctors by Removing Her Wrinkles with This Inexpensive TipSmart Life ReportsIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier Living10 Types of Women You Should Never MarryNueeyThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

¿Tregua? Manténgase en guardia

first_imgLa noticia de que el gobierno de Obama finalmente ha aceptado una tregua parcial sobre Siria con Rusia no trajo un alivio verdadero a quienes están preocupadas/os por el pueblo sirio o sobre el peligro de una guerra más amplia. El enfrentamiento entre las potencias nucleares fue quizás sólo pospuesta, y aún puede empeorar. El movimiento contra la guerra y el antiimperialista en Estados Unidos debe permanecer en estado de alerta.El ejército turco ha estado bombardeando zonas kurdas a través de la frontera y amenaza con una invasión. Los neoconservadores estadounidenses se quejan de que Bashar al-Assad sigue siendo presidente de Siria. Se ha informado que el régimen de Arabia Saudita busca armas nucleares. La paz no ha llegado todavía.En la cobertura actual de la guerra contra Siria por los medios corporativos, hay un intento continuo por culpar al gobierno de Damasco por todo lo que le sucede al pueblo sirio. Stephen Kinzer, ex corresponsal del New York Times, que actualmente es un alto miembro del Instituto Watson de Estudios Internacionales de la Universidad de Brown, calificó esta cobertura como “uno de los episodios más vergonzosos de la historia de la prensa estadounidense”. (Boston Globe, 18 de febrero)Dado que la cobertura de los medios corporativos de Siria distorsiona constantemente lo que está ocurriendo allí, una revisión de la historia reciente es necesaria. En 2011, después de un corto período de protestas sin armas, comenzó un conflicto entre el régimen por un lado y grupos armados reaccionarios del tipo Al-Qaeda por el otro. Estos grupos estaban armados y financiados por Arabia Saudita, así como Turquía y otras potencias de la OTAN, y todos estaban alentados por los imperialistas, incluyendo Washington.El resultado ha sido casi cinco años de una guerra reaccionaria internacional contra el gobierno legítimo y soberano de Siria. Combatientes sectarios y reaccionarios proveyeron las tropas sobre el terreno contra el gobierno de Damasco. La guerra ha matado a más de 250.000 sirios, alrededor de dos tercios de ellos soldados sirios y civiles a favor del gobierno, y ha llevado a millones de sirias/os al exilio, incluyendo hacia Europa, pero sobre todo en la misma región.El imperialismo estadounidense y sus aliados, incluido el régimen turco y las monarquías del Golfo, son los responsables de este horror. Fue sólo a mediados de 2014, cuando el grupo Estado Islámico (EI) declaró un “califato” y comenzó a amenazar los intereses imperialistas en Siria e Irak, que Washington comenzó a alterar su apoyo incondicional a la oposición siria.Pero incluso cuando EUA alegó estar atacando el EI, los del establecimiento estadounidense que nunca quisieron renunciar al objetivo de “cambio de régimen” en Siria, se resistieron. A pesar de la campaña de propaganda contra el EI, poco se hizo para degradar la posición sobre Siria de estos reaccionarios.No fue hasta el pasado otoño, cuando Rusia intervino por invitación de Siria, que la ofensiva rusa-iraní-Hizbolá-siria comenzó a erosionar la posición militar de los grupos como el EI y Al Qaeda. Los neoconservadores y todos los estrategas imperialistas se sienten frustrados por su incapacidad para controlar los acontecimientos, no importa cuánto destruyan, como muestra su experiencia en Irak, Libia, Yemen y ahora Siria. Están ahora aún más frustrados ya que el apoyo de Rusia, Irán y Hizbolá por su aliado sirio ha mejorado las posibilidades de una victoria sobre los reaccionarios.En ese artículo del Boston Globe, Kinzer argumenta que sólo apoyando a las fuerzas del gobierno sirio se puede derrotar al grupo Estado Islámico.A pesar de la argumentación racional de Kinzer, no hay razón para esperar que los que están en el poder en EUA sigan su consejo. No sería la primera vez en la historia que los militaristas sobreestimen su propia capacidad para controlar los acontecimientos mediante el uso de la fuerza. No olvidemos que cada potencia imperialista europea antes de la Primera Guerra Mundial creía que podía derrotar rápidamente a sus enemigos.El 23 de enero, mientras el secretario de Estado John Kerry promovía las conversaciones de paz sobre Siria, el vicepresidente Joe Biden estaba en Ankara prometiendo apoyo al régimen turco, que había pedido a EUA ser más agresivo contra Rusia en Siria. Ya sea este enfoque de dos caras una táctica de negociación o un signo de diferencias en la administración, deja plasmado el peligro de una guerra más amplia.Las/os que están dentro de EUA que quieren luchar contra la guerra, sólo pueden tomar un respiro corto y tener el peligro de una guerra mayor en la mira. Deben estar preparadas/os para lo que suceda a continuación, listas/os para hacerle frente a cualquier escalada de EUA, la OTAN, Turquía o Arabia Saudita en su guerra contra Siria y sus aliados.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

‘Values and Ventures’ competition attracts undergrads from all over

first_imgReddIt Facebook Facebook Linkedin 2015 Values and Ventures winners from San Diego State University with the grand prize check. printIt started in 2011 with only six teams. Today, the Neeley School of Business’ Values and Ventures competition is the largest solely undergraduate business plan competition in the U.S.Last year, 49 teams competed; the same number is expected in April. The University of Notre Dame and Harvard University are among past competitors.The competition hosts a diverse pool of participants and aims to provide a platform for undergraduate entrepreneurs.“Most of them [business plan competitions] are geared for the graduate level student, which can be pretty intimidating,” said Matthew Smilor, director of Values and Ventures. “Undergraduates have just as valid as ideas as well, so let’s give them a platform to shine as well.”The competition is open to any undergraduate student around the world with a business plan for a for-profit enterprise with a social purpose.Smilor said students across all colleges and disciplines, not just business students, are encouraged to compete.“There’s been inspiring stories across the board with these different teams and ideas that are really crossing that threshold of just a concept or idea to an actual revenue-generating business that can make a difference,” Smilor said.Last year’s grand prize winners were from San Diego State University, but some of TCU’s very own got recognition. TCU students Nik Hall and Garrett Adair received an honorable mention for their business plan Vitafive, a vitamin subscription service.Adair, a senior entrepreneurial management major, said the competition gave him a place to show the passion he had for his business.No matter where they place in the competition, Smilor said he hopes it provides the students with a learning experience, networking opportunities and a good time.“I want them to look forward to coming to Fort Worth and being invited to this competition because of the friendships they’re going to make, the experiences they’re going to have, and the knowledge they’re going to gain,” Smilor said.This year’s competition will be held April 8-9 in the Brown-Lupton University Union. SGA holds student memorial to honor lives of four students Update: No forced entry in TCC student’s homicide + posts Ryder Buttryhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ryder-buttry/ Twitter Ryder Buttryhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ryder-buttry/ World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution center_img Linkedin TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Ryder Buttryhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ryder-buttry/ Ryder Buttryhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ryder-buttry/ Twitter Fort Worth businessman donates full first-year tuition for TCU medical school students TCU steps up efforts to promote financial literacy with new additions to Money Week Previous articleSGA House of Representatives election season beginsNext articleWhy TCU didn’t sound the alert for Wednesday’s storm Ryder Buttry RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Ryder Buttry ReddIt Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

SGA holds Outreach Day to interact with students

first_img Previous articleYoung Americans for Freedom to host guest speaker Ben ShapiroNext articleMovember 5K brings awareness to men’s health Cole Polley RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ Facebook Linkedin printLast week, Student Government Association held an Outreach Day with the purpose of going out and talking to TCU students about improvements that can be made on campus.On Outreach Day, which was started last year, SGA members meet at their normal time and then spread out to different parts of campus to talk to students before reconvening to discuss the results.“Ultimately what we want to do is make students’ lives better,” Student Body Vice President of Operations Kat Klein said. “Outreach Day is a way we can get out there and interface with the students and come up with the things that need to be worked on.”Klein also noted that she thought the operation was much more successful this year than last.“It went well last year and everyone enjoyed it but I think it improved tenfold this time,” Klein said. “We had great feedback…so I think we have a lot of good things to work off of.”Some of the feedback mentioned in the House of Representatives meeting included students who were concerned about tuition, SGA elections and diversity on campus.“We’re here for our constituents, they’re the ones who put us in this position in the first place,” Chaplain Laredo Loyd said. “It’s amazing to get so many ideas in one 45 minute span, and as soon as you get an idea it creates discussion.”In addition to the discussion concerning Outreach Day that was held in Tuesday’s meeting time, there is more discussion slated for this week’s agenda, in which representatives will get a chance to put the ideas they gathered into action.For more information on Outreach Day, other upcoming events on campus and anything else that is going on with SGA, visit the SGA website. Cole is a Sophomore Journalism major from Llano, Texas. He’s an avid Seinfeld watcher and he is passionate about the San Antonio Spurs, listening to Drake & chicken wings. Hit him up on Twitter @CPolley12! Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history SGA President Maddie Reddick and House Rep. Blake Tilley discuss the seriousness of the campus carry issue with House members. Twitter ReddIt World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution + posts SGA brings ‘It’s On Us’ to campus in joint Big 12 initiativecenter_img Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ Cole Polleyhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/cole-polley/ ReddIt Students squeezed at Market Square, renovations looming Facebook Robert Carr Chapel holds Election Day service Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Linkedin Twitter Cole Polley TAGStext only SGA supports addition of new minorlast_img read more

OC production in remembrance of Holocaust

first_img WhatsApp Jewish Virtual Library.OC Theatre, Art, Music.Ector Middle School. Facebook Local NewsEducation OC production in remembrance of Holocaust Registration set for engineering camp Twitter Previous articleBOYS BASKETBALL: Permian puts clamps on Odessa High as Panthers stay atop district standingsNext articlePetitioners seeking council change plan final push admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest WhatsApp By admin – January 17, 2018 Facebook Odessa College students Alyssa Priest as Raja Englanderova, left, and Savannah Poor as Irena Synkova, act out a scene from “I Never Saw a Butterfly,” a play about the Holocaust that will be performed for ECISD middle school students. Twitter Home Local News Education OC production in remembrance of Holocaust Noel earns award To help mark International Holocaust Remembrance Day, Odessa College is producing “I Never Saw Another Butterfly” Jan. 19 and Jan. 20 with matinees for Ector County Independent School District middle school students.The Jan. 19 and Jan. 20 stagings will be at 7:30 p.m. in the Jack Rodgers Fine Arts Center on the OC campus, 201 W. University Blvd.Matinees for middle school students are Jan. 19, Jan. 26 and Feb. 2 at Ector Middle School, but those are not open to the public, said Mark Kolokoff, head of Odessa College’s Theatre Performance Program. The performances are free.Carl Berry Moore was hired to direct “I Never Saw Another Butterfly,” but had an illness in the family, so Kolokoff is now producing and directing the show.“I Never Saw Another Butterfly” is set in a concentration camp at Terezin in what is now the Czech Republic. “Of the vast majority of Czech Jews who were taken to Terezin (or Theresienstadt), 97,297 died among whom were 15,000 children. Only 132 of those children were known to have survived,” the Jewish Virtual Library website said.“Holocaust remembrance day is Jan. 27, so we thought it would be a good idea to correspond the showing of this with that memorial or remembrance,” Kolokoff said.Ector Middle School Director of Student Services Rebecca Osborne said about 4,000 students overall are expected to view the performances.At Ector, Osborne said students are reading the script ahead of time. She added that it’s a 40-minute version of the play.“Reading dramatic literature is part of the TEKS and so is poetry. The play is based, in part, on the poetry that the children that were living in a concentration camp wrote,” Osborne said.TEKS stands for Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills and are the state’s educational standards in all subjects.Kolokoff said he has had matinees at OC, but he has never toured for ECISD students.“It’s gone well,” Kolokoff said of the production. “The challenge is that they haven’t rehearsed since last semester because they had break, so this is the first rehearsal today to get it going again. Since I haven’t been involved in the directing, I’m not super familiar with what they’ve done with it so I’ll see it for the first time today.”Kolokoff said it’s important to perform “I Never Saw Another Butterfly” so people don’t forget history.“I don’t believe any of us should ever lose sight of the fact that the holocaust took place …,” Kolokoff said. “… I think needs to be fresh all the time because if we ever forget that these events in history have taken place, then what’s going to stop us from repeating them.”Bringing it to this age group also is relevant because Kolokoff said he’s not sure middle school students really have an understanding of the holocaust, especially that children died in it and suffered as much as the adults.He added that the Nazis built Terezin as a facade so they could fool people into thinking they were treating the prisoners well.Stage Manager Cristi Lloyd said the performances are a chance to present theater to people who wouldn’t always attend an OC show.Although Christmas break occurred in the middle of rehearsals, Lloyd said the cast is “really strong.”“We’ve worked together a lot, and so I think that together we’ll pull through. Even if it’s a little rough at first, we’ll be able to get it together for sure,” she said.Caleb Jones, who plays a camp inmate and leader of the boys’ homes, said the play’s focus on youngsters instead of adults makes it relevant.It will give students a chance to see how children their own age suffered and how they lost everything.“I think it will be good for them to relate that to themselves,” Jones said.Aaron Callaway, who plays a Nazi soldier, said he likes stories of holocaust survivors.“I feel like they’re stories that need to be told, especially this one,” Callaway said.Callaway added that he doesn’t think the holocaust is taught enough.“People talk about it, but (the) consequences and the things that happen aren’t fully stressed enough. I think this is a good way to show them … just a little bit of what happened try to make them understand it more,” Callaway said.Osborne said she talked to Kolokoff last May about how the school could work with OC to use the power of theater to benefit students in ECISD, and Ector in particular.“Mark and I both realize that theater provides wonderful opportunities for cross-curricular instruction and ‘I Never Saw Another Butterfly’ is a vehicle for those opportunities,” Osborne said.This play, she said relates to social studies and English especially.“Anytime you’re studying dramatic literature and attending live theatrical performances that helps us to better understand our world and the people who live in it,” Osborne said.More Information OCA top 2 were ESL students Pinterest Upside Down Blueberry Pie CheesecakeFoolproof Roasted Pork TenderloinHawaiian Roll Ham SlidersPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay last_img read more

Master Gardeners honor past members of association

first_img Print Article Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Trojans celebrate conference championship The Troy Trojans women’s basketball team is heading back to the NCAA Tournament for the first time since 2017 after… read more On a warm but windy March morning, members of the Pike County Master GardenersAssociation honored the memories of two members with the planting of trees at the Troy Sportsplex.“What better way to honor those who have given their lives in service to others than to plant trees in their memory,” said Leigh Calk, Master Gardener president. Latest Stories Next UpThe Master Gardeners planted willow oaks in memory of David Carpenter and Willie Scott along the walking trail that offers a two-mile beautiful walk through the outdoors and wooded areas.The memorial tree for Carpenter was a replacement tree for the autumn blaze maple that was planted in 2013.Carpenter was a Pike County Master Gardener and a retired Pike County Extension agent. Published 9:54 pm Wednesday, March 10, 2021 Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration You Might Like “All three were dedicated and contributing members of the Pike County Master Gardeners Association,” Caulk said. “Planting memorial trees is a way to remember them and also a way to give back by adding to the beauty of the walking trail here at the Troy Sportsplex.”The Master Gardeners were assisted with the planting of the trees by employees at the Sportsplex.Caulk expressed appreciation to the young men who contributed to the site preparation and to the planting of the trees: Dalton Fuller, Kendall Bailey, Reed Ledford, John Chambliss and Brian Meadows.The willow oaks came from the Thurlow Nursery in Auburn and should do well as they are planted in good soil, bedded with a topping of pine straw and provided with the services of a “Treegator,” which is a 15-gallon vessel that will provide slow release watering for the trees.The Master Gardeners take comfort in that the trees will help keep memories alive and take pride in contributing to the beautification of the Troy Sportsplex Walking Trail. By Jaine Treadwell Troy falls to No. 13 Clemsoncenter_img Jaine Treadwell | The MessengerFor Debbie Carpenter (center), the memorial tree that honors her husband, David, is a blessing. The tree was planted by the Pike County Master Gardeners. The plaque recognizes Master Gardener David Carpenter as “one who gave of himself so that others may enjoy the beauty around them.” Book Nook to reopen Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Master Gardeners honor past members of association By The Penny Hoarder Email the author Sponsored Content Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Patriot Health ZoneHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential Health32-second Stretch Ends Back Pain & Sciatica (Watch)Healthier LivingThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel “David and Dena Barnes, who was also a Pike County Extension agent, got the first Pike County Master Gardener Class together, Calk said. “Willie Scott was also a Pike County Master Gardener and a contributing member.”Debbie Carpenter said the tree that memorializes her husband is a wonderful tribute to him and a blessing to her and all those who love him.Two Crepe Myrtles have been planted along the walking trail in memory of Elaine Blair, who was a Pike County Master Gardener.Caulk said the memorial trees are living, lasting tributes and a way to honor Carpenter, Scott and Blair by emphasizing life.last_img read more

GUEST POST: Why lettings proptech had its moment during lockdown

first_imgHome » News » Agencies & People » GUEST POST: Why lettings proptech had its moment during lockdown previous nextProptechGUEST POST: Why lettings proptech had its moment during lockdownLeading industry figure Michael Cook argues why he thinks lettings is now the key area for innovation within the property industry.Michael Cook, National MD Lettings, Leaders Romans Group19th October 20201 Comment1,927 Views Tenant enquiries and property viewings unsurprisingly slowed this spring, due to the Government restrictions brought in to manage the pandemic.But the lettings market didn’t stop during that period – far from it, in fact. Many letting agencies used the opportunity to develop innovative solutions that would help the sector keep growing and make the rental process as easy as possible, for both landlords and tenants.The rise of virtual viewings is one of the most visible examples of this in action, with technology and innovation working together to help tenants view properties without leaving their home. Despite trepidation about how tenants would respond to virtual viewings, demand isn’t going away.Now, we’re in the middle of a lettings market boom, with Rightmove reporting record rental demand in July, and enquiries up 40% year-on-year. With more tenants entering the market, or contemplating a move, now is the time for letting agencies to embrace more forms of property technology, or proptech to make the buy-to-let market more efficient and easier for all.Six ways proptech is disrupting the lettings sector 1 Virtual viewingsVirtual viewings aren’t completely new, but they saw a huge uplift during the pandemic, with Zoopla reporting a 215% increase in video tour listings on their site. Video tours help tenants who are unable to see a house physically still view their future home, while landlords can be assured of less wasteful viewings.Some commercial property developers employ 360° walkthroughs, but such advanced technology isn’t essential to make a good property tour. In fact, for much of the lettings market, a simpler approach is better.With rental demand so high, some properties can be let within a day. Therefore, it’s essential that virtual viewing videos are turned around quickly and letting agencies provide their team with the right technology to shoot and edit a high-quality video themselves.We have found the best way to do this is supply all our agents with hand-held smartphone gimbles or stabilisers so they can film a steady and professional tour video. We also recommend an easy-to-use video editing app and on brand graphics, so that creating a professional and consistent virtual viewing video can be done in less than an hour.2 Virtual branchesWhen the lockdown was first announced, agencies transitioned to working remotely overnight. Thanks to softphone technology – VOIP software that redirects branch calls to a computer – letting agents can maintain customer contact just as if they were in the office.This proves branches can operate remotely without a bricks-and-mortar office and the industry is now seeing a number of virtual letting branches open across the UK. With a virtual branch, agencies are able to make the most of local expertise, deliver the personal touch and be that all important reassuring presence through the whole process in a growing number of areas, even without a high street presence.3 Landlord and property management portalsProptech innovations don’t only benefit the lettings industry; they can also make the lives of landlords and tenants easier. An online portal gives landlords instant access to accounts, reports and surveys, as well as maintenance and future plans for their properties – helping them to keep on top of their investments without a lot of paperwork. The software can also issue rent and tenancy review reminders, putting the landlord in control and saving agencies hundreds of admin hours.Meanwhile, block management teams can automate maintenance and admin by running metre readings, managing door access codes and electronic car park entry at the click of a button. In the future, smart building technology could make the maintenance process even more efficient with touchless access and automated monitoring for thermostats, appliances, lights and leaks. Smart technology is already common in new commercial developments, so we will likely see it soon used in residential lettings and new build developments, reimagining the lettings experience.4 Online tenant onboarding Online portals are also an efficient and stress-free way for agents to screen tenants, help them move in and ensure all documentation is up-to-date. While this tech still isn’t that common in the industry, widespread adoption would see far less documents to track and greater onboarding efficiency.On the financial side, open banking is set to transform tenant reference checks and payments. It makes the reference process instant, providing a real-time view of a tenant’s bank account, income and previous rent payments. This will allow landlords and agents to turn around affordability checks in minutes, instead of days, and will arguably paint a more accurate picture of tenant affordability.5 Maintenance managementMaintenance apps enable tenants to determine and report property issues, while also being able to self-diagnose small issues on the spot. At LRG, our portal has already shown a 16% reduction in reported maintenance issues in our managed properties. Tenants can get advice and track support queries, while landlords can get the reassurance that repair teams are only being called out when an issue really warrants it.6 Online auctionsWith large gatherings still restricted under the pandemic guidelines, it looks unlikely that in-person auctions will return in 2020. Therefore dedicated online auction technology is vital to offer opportunity for property investors.Online auctions allow landlords and investors to log on from wherever they are in the country, or the world, and make bids on a property through the website. The process combines the auction bidding experience with a secure, digital sales process – all in real time. With the level of UK properties sold at online auction up by almost 13%, it’s clear there is strong demand for a fast, easy and efficient tool for all landlords and investors to buy and sell property at auction. Now it’s up to more agencies to provide the technology to support their customers.Embracing the futureAs a service industry, our customers will always have the biggest role to play in shaping the lettings sector, but it’s clear that proptech is key to help it transform for the future. Attitudes to technology in the property sector have warmed significantly since the on-set of the pandemic: 87% of property professionals now say that technology is a force for good compared to 71% at the beginning of the year.While the property market has traditionally been relatively slow to respond to technological changes, COVID-19 has only accelerated the role of technology in the industry. Now letting agencies must embrace these proptech solutions to ensure they are not left behind as the industry rapidly modernises.Read The Neg’s guide to proptech.Leaders Romans Group Michael Cook proptech Rightmove Zoopla October 19, 2020Nigel LewisOne commentAndrew Stanton, CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist CEO Proptech-PR Real Estate Influencer & Journalist 19th October 2020 at 8:32 amIt is good to see those in a position of authority talking about the positive empowerment that digital transformation is now giving forward thinking agencies. All it needs is for the word ‘disruption’ to disappear when tech is used in a discussion about real estate, and change it for ‘facilitator of profit and maximum efficiencies’ and maybe a lot more adopters will jump on board.VR and AR and the gamification of the sector are going to do nothing but accelerate over the next year. Many agencies realise that WFH is a metaphor for ‘everything has changed’ and this is an opportunity to refine their business model, losing some of those crippling fixed costs that high street premises entail.Doing ‘property’ digitally is now coming of age, yes property professionals are still required, but less of them, and more enabled by tech, 2021 is going to see a big shift in many verticals.Log in to ReplyWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021last_img read more