Jess Breach: How to deliver a hand-off

first_img England Women’s full-back Danielle Waterman gives her top… Mike Haley: How to perfect your positioning at 15 Jess Breach: How to deliver a hand-offHarlequins wing Jess Breach has an impressive strike rate, scoring 22 tries in 13 Tests for England, including six on her debut against Canada. Her pace is a key component to her finishing ability but handing off defenders can also help her create try-scoring opportunities. Here are her tips on perfecting the fend…Right timing“A hand-off or fend can be beneficial anywhere on the pitch to help you break a 
one-on-one tackle. Ideally you want 
to get past the tackler before you put your arm out, so they can’t grab you while they’re following you, and you also need to be close enough to reach them with your outstretched arm.”Full stretch“Move the ball to the opposite hand of where the tackler is so you can reach out. Then fully extend your arm towards them, aiming for their shoulder region. You want to stretch your arm out and use them to push off, so you can run onwards from the hand-off. Then pull your arm back so the tackler can’t grab it.”Hand placement Hand out: England’s Jess Breach prepares to fend against Ireland (Getty Images) “Make sure you don’t go for the face or neck region when handing 
off as you’ll get penalised. Look 
to make contact with the shoulder and use that as a platform. It’s 
a firmer area, too, so you’re 
able to generate more momentum from handing 
off in that area.”MORE SKILLS ADVICE… The Exeter Chiefs and England wing explains how… Jack Nowell: How to up your wing work-rate Jack Nowell: How to up your wing work-rate Collapse Beating defenders“There are other ways 
I look to offset defenders. I’ll look at how their feet are planted and if they’re flat-footed look to use my footwork to beat them. Also I might change my speed, so go towards them quickly, then slow down, then go again so it offsets them.”This article originally appeared in the July 2019 edition of Rugby World magazine. The Harlequins and England wing gives her tips for the perfect fend Mike Haley: How to perfect your positioning at 15 Expand LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Every month Rugby World features advice from professional players and coaches on specific skills. Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Danielle Waterman: How to sidestep Sale Sharks full-back Mike Haley gives his top… Expand Danielle Waterman: How to sidesteplast_img read more

Sale v Saracens live stream: How to watch from anywhere

first_img Sale v Saracens live stream: How to watch from anywhereMatch one of Owen Farrell’s five-game suspension sees Saracens face a daunting Gallagher Premiership test in Manchester (6pm). Sale have scored precisely 100 points in beating Wasps, Bristol and Leicester in their previous three outings and the Sharks will be confident they can overcome their understrength visitors.Farrell, the England stand-off and captain, received his ban last night for a “reckless” tackle on Wasps’ Charlie Atkinson last Saturday. He will be free to play again on 5 October, ruling him out of Sarries’ Heineken Champions Cup quarter-final at Leinster. His England commitments, including a Six Nations date in Rome on 31 October, will be unaffected.Related content: Owen Farrell sent offSaracens had been chugging along nicely until that Wasps match, which ended a ten-match unbeaten home record. The Farrell incident deflected from the fact that such a strong Sarries line-up went down to a side missing almost all of their front-liners.As Bristol’s thumping of Northampton last night showed, it can be hard for teams lacking the incentive of play-off rugby to maintain the thunderous tempo of Premiership rugby when the games come so thick and fast.Sarries tonight give a first outing since February to Scotland centre Duncan Taylor while Doncaster Knights loanee Robin Hislop could make his club debut from off the bench.Seven of the starting XV, including the half-backs, Manu Vunipola and Tom Whiteley, and the second-rows, Joel Kpoku and Callum Hunter-Hill, played in Saracens’ 36-22 win over Sale at a blustery Allianz Park last February. Watch highlights of that reverse fixture here.Sale are within touching distance of a first semi-final since 2005-06, when they went on to win the title. Aside from their sloppiness at restarts, DoR Steve Diamond was delighted by their performance at Welford Road, when they achieved a first-ever bonus-point win at the ground. Victory tonight will allow Sale to jump back ahead of Bristol into second place as the clubs scrap for a home semi-final, albeit one that may be played in an empty stadium.Newly signed flanker Cobus Wiese, the tenth South African on Sale’s books, is on the bench tonight as Diamond makes 11 changes to his match-day squad. Sam Hill will make his home debut for the club, there’s a second Premiership start for Russian loosehead Valery Morozov, and England U20 stars Tom Roebuck and Arron Reed get a run in the back three.Keep an eye on Sharks’ discipline tonight – Sale players are fined £50 each if the team concedes more than ten penalties in a match. Under the stricter tackle/breakdown laws now in operation, that’s a pretty stiff challenge!Mind your back! Referee Ian Tempest takes evasive action as Faf de Klerk kicks against Leicester (Getty)Sale: Simon Hammersley; Tom Roebuck, Sam James, Sam Hill, Arron Reed; Robert du Preez, Will Cliff; Valerey Morozov, Curtis Langdon, Will-Griff John, Matt Postlethwaite, James Phillips, Cameron Neild, Ben Curry (capt), Daniel du Preez.Replacements: 16 Ewan Ashman, 17 Bevan Rodd, 18 Jake Cooper-Woolley, 19 Cobus Wiese, 20 Jean-Luc du Preez, 21 Faf de Klerk, 22 Tom Curtis, 23 Connor Doherty.Saracens: Elliott Obatoyinbo; Dom Morris, Duncan Taylor, Juan Pablo Socino, Rotimi Segun; Manu Vunipola, Tom Whiteley; Sam Crean, Tom Woolstencroft, Alec Clarey, Joel Kpoku, Callum Hunter-Hill, Calum Clark, Sean Reffell, Andy Christie.Replacements: 16 Kapeli Pifeleti, 17 Robin Hislop, 18 Josh Ibuanokpe, 19 Cameron Boon, 20 Janco Venter, 21 Alex Day, 22 Will Hooley, 23 Harry Sloan.Here we explain how to find a reliable Sale v Saracens live stream wherever you are.How to watch Sale v Saracens from outside your countryIf you’re abroad, but still want to watch your local Premiership coverage, like Sale v Saracens today, you can do so by using a VPN – Virtual Private Network.VPNs allow you to get around any geo-blocking by changing your IP address so you appear in a different location and can watch the same legal Premiership live stream you would at home.Our friends at TechRadar have tested hundreds of VPN and recommend ExpressVPN, which is easy to use, has strong security features and allows you to watch on several devices at once, including smart TVs and phones, iPads, tablets, PCs and Macs.Plus, ExpressVPN comes with a 30-day money-back guarantee. You can try it out for a month for free or sign up for an annual plan and get three months free. Sale v Saracens live stream: How to watch from the UKSale v Saracens, which kicks off at 6pm tonight, will be shown live on BT Sport Extra 2 in the UK. If you don’t have a BT contract but want to watch the match, don’t worry because you can still easily watch it online.That’s because BT Sport has a contract-free monthly pass that allows you to get instant access to all four of their sport channels for just £25.That’s great value given they’re showing every Premiership game played behind closed doors live and will also be covering the European Champions and Challenge Cup knockout stages in September and October. Plus, you can cancel at any time because there’s no contract.Get a BT Sport Monthly PassClubs are also working with BT Sport to allow season ticket-holders free access to home games on the channel’s app.If you’re from the UK but are overseas when Sale v Saracens takes place, you can get your normal live stream but you’ll need a VPN – see the information above.Sale v Saracens live stream: How to watch from the USAIf you live in the States, the official broadcaster of Premiership matches is NBC, with matches streamed on NBC Sports Gold so you can watch them anytime and anywhere.Sale v Saracens will kick off at 1pm EST and 10am on the West Coast.The NBC Sports Gold Pass for rugby is $79.99 and includes coverage of the Gallagher Premiership, European Champions and Challenge Cups, and Guinness Six Nations.Sale v Saracens live stream: How to watch from AustraliaFor those in Australia, Fox Sports have the rights to show Premiership matches. You can watch Sale v Saracens on Fox Sports More from 3am tomorrow morning (AEST).The Foxtel Sports HD bundle is $74 a month – and you get 50+ other channels as well as Foxtel GO, so you can watch when on the move.Foxtel Sports HD bundle offer Sale v Saracens live stream: How to watch from South AfricaIf you want to keep track of the many South Africans plying their trade in the Premiership, including the large contingent at Sale, then SuperSport shows matches in South Africa.South Africa is one hour ahead of the UK, so Sale Sharks v Saracens kicks off at 7pm on SuperSport Grandstand and Variety 2.There are various DStv packages available that give access to SuperSport, ranging from EasyView, with access to Blitz, to Premium, with all ten sports channels.Guess who: Saracens boss Nigel Wray looks on from the stands during the match against Wasps (Getty)We recommend VPN services in the context of legal recreational uses. For example:Accessing a service from another country (subject to the terms and conditions of that service)Protecting your online security and strengthening your online privacy when abroadWe do not support or condone the illegal or malicious use of VPN services. Consuming pirated content that is paid-for is neither endorsed nor approved by Future Publishing. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Congested area: Jono Ross is thwarted during Sale’s league defeat to Saracens in February (Getty Images) Sale v Saracens live stream: How to watch from New ZealandIt’s little wonder that Sky Sport NZ, with ten sports channels, including one dedicated to rugby, is the rights-holder for Premiership matches in New Zealand.If you want to tune in to Sale v Saracens from the Land of the Long White Cloud, the match kicks off at 5am tomorrow morning on Sky Sport NZ 4.It costs $31.99 a month to add Sky Sport to your Sky Starter pack ($25.99), but if you sign up for 12 months before 30 September 2020 you’ll get your first month free. Plus, you’ll get Sky Go, which allows you to watch live rugby wherever you are.Sky Sport NZ offer Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Sale will reclaim second spot with victory over a Saracens side reeling from the loss of suspended talisman Owen Farrell. Here’s what you need to know about tonight’s game Check out ExpressVPNlast_img read more

‘Transformational trip’ focuses on human rights-based development

first_img Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Doug Mouncey says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Koshy Mathews says: Rector Albany, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments are closed. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 April 10, 2013 at 11:59 pm Our mission group from Saint Peter’s Episcopal Church in Phoenixville, PA has been going to El Salvador for the last five years under the direction of Cristosal Foundation. Our members find these trips to be truly transformational and mutually beneficial as they help us build relationship with people across the border breaking social, political, economic, linguistic and ethnic barriers. We are going back to El Salvador this summer with another group from Trinity Episcopal Church in Princeton, New Jersey. It is our hope that we can visit the El Carmen community in the Baja Lomba region this time. We thank Cristosal Foundation and their staff for helping these types of transformational trips possible. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR ‘Transformational trip’ focuses on human rights-based development April 11, 2013 at 6:08 am As a member of the Cristosal Board, thanks Lynette for this wonderful story and to our entire team and the people of El Salvador for your welcome of all of our transformational trips. People could visit our Foundation Cristosal web site to learn about organizing a similar trip. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET April 10, 2013 at 11:06 pm Congratulations to this group of young people for their pilgrimage ans especially for their solidarity with the Salvadoran people. It was good to provide the pump, but transformative to become in relationship with the people of El Carmen. They are truly special people as are all the people I have met in El Salvador. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 David Starr says: Comments (3) Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA center_img By Lynette WilsonPosted Apr 10, 2013 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Shreveport, LA An ecumenical group from Anacortes, Washington, spent March 29-April 5 in El Salvador learning about Foundation Cristosal’s human rights-based approach to community development on a “transformational trip” organized and facilitated by the organization. ENS Photo/Lynette Wilson[Episcopal News Service – San Salvador, El Salvador] Without a skilled driver and a four-wheel-drive pickup, visitors can reach El Carmen in El Salvador’s Bajo Lempa region only on foot or horseback.Yet for a group of nine Episcopalians, Lutherans and one Roman Catholic from Anacortes, Washington, recently visiting the Central American country, the isolated village of El Carmen was the main destination. On Easter, they huddled in the bed of a compact, red Nissan pickup and held on to the roll bar and to each other while the driver dodged cattle, washouts, rivers and ruts. They sheltered their heads with hats against the midday sun, and those lucky enough to have handkerchiefs covered their faces with them to filter the dust.El Carmen is one of four communities – and one of two in the Bajo Lempa, or the lower Lempa River delta – served by Foundation Cristosal, a human rights-based community development organization with roots in the Anglican and Episcopal churches. The group – four adults and five youth – spent March 29-April 5 in El Salvador learning about Cristosal’s human rights-based approach to community development on a “transformational trip” organized and facilitated by the organization.“[With] traditional mission trips, mission often involves groups of foreigners coming down to do some ‘project’ and help in some way, even if they might have limited knowledge about the country and the people they are serving,” said Olivia Amadon, trips coordinator. “But at Cristosal, we believe that the first step in the process of development is to learn about the country and the people whom we are serving and to learn not only what their needs are but what their assets and desires are.”“The trips are often only the first step in ‘helping’ or ‘development’ because relationships are formed,” she said. “And our goal is that people will continue to maintain those relationships with the communities and Cristosal.”In 2010, the ecumenical group entered into a relationship with El Carmen when its youth group raised money to buy the community a new water pump, intended to push spring water up a 90-meter incline into the homes of 26 families. Over the last three years, the group has sold herbs, potted plants and blackberry jam and hosted dinners to help finance this year’s trip to El Salvador. On March 31, group members made it to El Carmen. While meeting with community members, they quickly learned that treating the symptom often doesn’t address the underlying problem.Rev. Carol Rodin, from Christ Episcopal Church in Anacortes, Washington, walks down the steep path to see the water pump in El Carmen. ENS Photo/Lynette Wilson“Just because we provided money for the pump doesn’t mean the problem is solved,” said the Rev. Carol Rodin, a transitional deacon from Christ Episcopal Church in Anacortes, who traveled to El Salvador with her daughter Mari, 17. “And we realize this is not the end. It’s good to hear about the problems so that we can work together to fix them.”The pump, community leaders said, doesn’t have the needed capacity. But the main problem lies in maintaining the pump that, not unlike the water system in El Salvador, has many moving parts.“It’s not only the pump, it’s administration. We’re helping them to develop the capacity to administer the system,” said Kenia Quintanilla Cruz, a lawyer and community organizer, during a meeting at Cristosal’s office in San Salvador.The community has established a water association to manage the system and collect funds from the community – 16 of 26 families are willing or can afford to pay. But when it comes to resolving mechanical issues and making funds available to fix or replacing parts, the association fails, Cruz said. Cristosal’s role is to provide the community with the fiduciary and maintenance skills and training necessary to manage the water system, she said.The water situation in El Carmen is not unique. More than 20 percent of El Salvador’s 6 million people don’t have access to water in their homes, with 60 percent of rural inhabitants affected. But that could change.After some six years of pressure from civil-society groups and nongovernmental organizations, a General Water Law was proposed in El Salvador’s General Assembly in March 2012. The law proposes that all Salvadorans have access to clean, plentiful water — a basic human right.In El Carmen, the water typically runs for two hours every four or five days when the pump is working, water association members told the visiting group. When it’s not working, the community hauls water in plastic canisters from a nearby river up the steep incline.“I see the people still struggling for basic human dignity and basic human rights,” said the Rev. Josefina Beecher, the former vicar of La Iglesia Episcopal de la Resurreccion in Mount Vernon, Washington, who lived in El Salvador from 1986 to 1994. She was happy to see small successes, such as a chicken farm in El Carmen that Cristosal and community members have partnered to build up, she said. “But I’m sad to see they are still fighting the same battles the war was fought over.”Between 1980 and 1992, a brutal civil war raged in El Salvador between the right-wing military regime and five guerilla groups organized as the Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberación Nacional, today the left’s FMLN political party. By official accounts, 75,000 people were killed. After the warring sides signed the United Nations-brokered Peace Accords in 1992, former guerilla fighters laid down their guns and began settling on unproductive lands, including El Carmen in the department, or state, of Usulután in western El Salvador.The 1980s were the darkest period in El Salvador’s history, said José Osvaldo López, a Cristosal lawyer, who was 10 in 1980. “The greatest number of human rights violations was taking place at a time when people were demanding their rights,” he said while speaking to the Washington group about human rights. “I was a boy when [Oscar] Romero was killed, and I couldn’t understand. He was untouchable. For me, well, everyone in this country regarded him as a saint. All he did was denounce injustices, and for that he was killed.”In this mural, on a wall in Mejicanos, a municipality adjacent to San Salvador, Oscar Romero is referred to as the “Saint of America.” For many Salvadorans, Romero was the “voice of the voiceless.” ENS Photo/Lynette WilsonRoman Catholic Archbishop Oscar A. Romero was martyred on March 24, 1980, when a gunman shot him in the heart while he celebrated a funeral Mass in the chapel on the grounds of a cancer hospital where he lived. Though he is not an official saint in the Roman Catholic Church, many Salvadorans view him as the “Saint of the Americas” and his assassination as the tipping point toward war. Romero and the Martyrs of El Salvador were added to the Episcopal Church calendar of commemorations in 2009 (General Convention Resolution A095).Throughout El Salvador’s civil war, and particularly in its aftermath, a culture of assistance and dependence has flourished in this, the smallest and most densely populated country in Central America, said Beecher, who is now retired and serves on Cristosal’s advisory board.Rather than contribute to a system that it believes perpetuates dependence, Cristosal prefers to invest in processes that seek to balance societal inequities.“El Salvador’s historical moment came with the signing of the 1992 Peace Accords, which opened the political process to all Salvadorans independent of their political ideology, race, gender, etc. But that was it,” said Noah F. Bullock, the executive director of Cristosal. “The peace accords didn’t address social and economic inequality,” he said. “They didn’t address many of the root causes of war. They simply said, ‘You can participate.’ So even though the peace accords offered political participation, the people entered a radically unequal political field.”Noah F. Bullock, executive director of Foundation Cristosal, talks with Andres Rosa Perez, one of the community leaders in El Carmen. ENS Photo/Lynette WilsonIn its approach to community development, Cristosal seeks to further the process set in motion by the accords by helping to empower El Salvador’s poor to act for justice and development as equal citizens in a democratic society. It promotes access to adequate housing, potable water, jobs and other economic opportunities, and the rule of law, which fall under the category of human rights often provided or promoted by governments in the developed world.Community leaders in El Carmen sitting next to the water pipes that carry spring water up a 90-meter incline into the homes of 26 families in El Carmen. ENS Photo/Lynette Wilson“Passing a [water] law won’t guarantee that the community has a functioning water system but it will be an important step toward establishing the right of citizens to clean water and the obligation on the state to preserve and protect water resources,” said Bullock, adding that the law is gaining support in the General Assembly.Besides supporting the water association and the chicken farm, whose success depends on access to water, Cristosal is working with community leaders to pressure local authorities to repair the road leading to El Carmen, a road the municipality is mandated by law to build. During the approaching rainy season that lasts from May to June, the road can become impassible, another potential glitch in getting the chickens to market. If successful, the chicken farm will create a stable economic initiative, providing jobs in a community in a country where 50 percent of the economically active population is under or unemployed, and 48 percent of Salvadorans live in absolute poverty.Before visiting El Carmen, the ecumenical group visited Los Calix, the second Bajo Lempa community that Cristosal serves, and participated in a five-hour Easter Vigil. In Los Calix, Cristosal is working with residents to build a mixed-use community center.Visit the“El Salvador Journey” blog for a full roundup and photos of stops the group made in El Salvador.Before arriving in El Salvador, the only other foreign country 14-year-old Christ Church member Kai Perschbacher had visited was Canada. His hometown of Anacortes sits midway between Seattle and Vancouver, British Columbia.“It’s a culture shock,” he said. “You look at pictures of Third World countries in National Geographic, but you don’t understand until you drive down these roads in the back of a pickup and see that people are living in poverty.”But, he added, you also see that it is possible to live with the bare necessities.Initially Mark Perschbacher, Kai’s father, thought it would be better to send money to El Salvador to invest in a project rather than visit. But he said he later realized that traveling to El Salvador would be a good way to teach the church’s youth group about how people live in other parts of the world. Despite the “bad wrap” El Salvador receives – it has one of the highest homicide rates in the world – he thought it would be OK to visit, he said.Sarah Hill and her daughters Grace and Zoe during a meeting with community members in El Carmen. ENS Photo/Lynette WilsonCelebration Lutheran Church member Sarah Hill anticipated that the trip would help instill in her daughters Zoe, 14, and Grace, 11, the importance of knowing how to work, manners, tolerance and the need to take ownership and responsibility for their actions.“When a family has means, it’s a challenge to raise a child that doesn’t feel entitled,” said Dr. Hill, a dentist. “That [entitlement] is incredibly prevalent in the United States.”Zoe Hill said she didn’t know what to expect in El Salvador. El Carmen was really rural, and “it gives you a shock,” she said. It’s beautiful, like the United States, but in a different way, she said.Getting off the plane, she worried that people wouldn’t accept her and would put her “in a box,” but that didn’t happen, she said. “Everyone has been welcoming.”Fifteen-year-old Will Sladich’s reflection on the poverty he’d witnessed in the Bajo Lempa was more existential.“It’s interesting that life goes on here whether we visit or not … all these people in these villages who we [Americans] would never know exist,” said Sladich, a member of Sacred Heart Church in La Conner, Washington.— Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. She currently is based in San Salvador, El Salvador.  Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

Anglicans tackle child trafficking in Zambia’s tourist capital

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC Advocacy Peace & Justice, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Communion, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Anglicans tackle child trafficking in Zambia’s tourist capital Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Tampa, FL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel By Bellah ZuluPosted Jul 3, 2013 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Young people in Zambia protest against human trafficking. Photo: Emmanuel Chikoya[Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Church in Zambia has welcomed the news that the country’s tourist capital Livingstone has partnered with the International Labour Organisation (ILO) to fight child trafficking and child labor there.“Being a border town, Livingstone is a fertile ground for human trafficking,” said the Rev. Emmanuel Chikoya, Livingstone West parish priest. “Just recently 32 children were almost trafficked into a neighboring country and members of the church were among those that exposed the incident.”The city of Livingstone is preparing to co-host the United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) General Assembly in August this year. Chikoya has urged his parishioners to be vigilant as some visitors may take advantage of the event as an avenue for human trafficking.“The fact that international delegates will be flocking to Livingstone…creates a perfect environment for people to be trafficked, especially for sexual services and any other forms of cheap labor,” he said. “When people notice unusual numbers of children in their neighborhood, they should question such occurrences. Let them take interest especially when they see somebody who is nervous and uneasy as this could be a case of human trafficking.”Through their social arm, the Livingstone Anglican Children’s Project (LACP), the Anglican Church has also been outspoken and active in trying to identify and prevent all forms of child labor.Chikoya, who is also the project’s director, said cases of human trafficking and forced labor were real and anyone can be trafficked either by force or coercion, or by being enticed by promises of better prospects.“So far we have withdrawn 300 children from child labor and about 400 children who are at risk of child labor,” revealed Chikoya. “Human trafficking and child labor are intertwined, hence the need to tackle them together.”Chikoya said that there are many forms of child labor, some of which may seem innocent and normal. “Some children are used to leading their handicapped parents, to prostitution, street vending, scavenging for empty water bottles for recycling and many others,” he revealed.“Withdrawing these kids from such activities also means that we need to deal with the issues of sustainability since for many, this is their source of income for them and their parents,” he said. “Therefore, we have also tried to empower their parents with basic income generating activities to help supplement their resources.”Chikoya concluded by emphasizing the need to involve children and women in any efforts of trying to curb child labor and human trafficking. “Since women and children are the worst hit in issues of human trafficking and child labor, there is need to actively involve them when carrying out sensitization programs”.He added, “Fighting human trafficking and forced labor requires the co-operation and support from everyone, including members of the community.” Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Africa, Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Human Trafficking Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York last_img read more

La inclusión y la diversidad distinguen el regreso de las…

first_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Miembros de la iglesia episcopal de San Pablo en Bakersfield, California, celebraron un oficio el 28 de julio para festejar el regreso a la propiedad de su iglesia. Foto de Autumn Parry para el Bakersfield Californian.[Episcopal News Service] El Rdo. Tim Vivian se propone participar en una marcha el fin de semana del Día del Trabajo.Vivian, sacerdote encargado de la iglesia de San Pablo [St. Paul’s Church] en Bakersfield, California, se unirá a otros en una peregrinación de 450 kilómetros desde la capital estatal de Sacramento hasta Bakersfield, para instar a los legisladores a aprobar una amplia reforma migratoria.Los que han de participar en la peregrinación, que reconstruye la histórica marcha de 1966 organizada por César Chávez en defensa de los derechos de los obreros agrícolas, se propone centrar su atención en el sufrimiento de las familias sin estatus de ciudadanía. Ello marca tanto un nuevo capítulo como una nueva misión para San Pablo, la cuarta propiedad de la Diócesis Episcopal de San Joaquín que es devuelta a la Iglesia Episcopal luego de las diferencias teológicas que dividieron la diócesis en 2006. Los ex miembros abandonaron la Iglesia Episcopal pero intentaron quedarse con sus propiedades.“Es importante participar porque, si vamos a hablar teológicamente de que todo el mundo ha sido creado a imagen y semejanza de Dios, no tiene sentido tener a personas que son de segunda clase y no ciudadanos”, dijo Vivian, profesor de estudios religiosos en la Universidad del Estado de California en Bakersfield, quien recorrerá el último tramo de la peregrinación, unos 50 kilómetros, de Delano a Bakersfield.“Si eres de segunda clase, eres de alguna manera un ser humano inferior, y queremos vivir realmente a la altura del mensaje del Evangelio que todos somos igualmente amados por Dios”.“He estado librando ese pelea aquí durante más de 15 años”, dijo Vivian, refiriéndose a la inclusión. “Es una afirmación de lo que realmente somos y de cómo tratamos en verdad de ser una iglesia del Evangelio… una iglesia de barrio, una iglesia céntrica”, agregó.A diferencia de otras congregaciones devueltas en San Joaquín, —en Turlock, Ridgecrest y Sonora— la mayoría de los miembros de San Pablo no estaban regresando a predios familiares. La mayor parte de la congregación —que asciende a unas 300 personas— comenzaron como dos casas iglesias nuevas —La Gracia [Grace] y Santa Brígida [St. Brigid’s] en Bakersfield— luego de la ruptura inicial.“Ninguna [de estas congregaciones] ya existe; el 1 de julio de 2013 ambas se convirtieron en San Pablo, dijo Vivian, que ayudó a organizar La Gracia como una casa iglesia con sólo un puñado de fieles hace seis años. Según fue creciendo, la congregación terminó por alquilar una pequeña capilla en otra iglesia local.Una celebración de ‘bienvenida’ para todos el 28 de julioNo fue una típica celebración de regreso, sino de bienvenida, el festival eucarístico del 28 de julio, cuando unos 200 episcopales de toda la Diócesis de San Joaquín y miembros de la comunidad se reunieron en San Pablo para celebrar la devolución de la propiedad.Luego de que el obispo de San Joaquín, Chet Talton, llamó tres veces a la puerta con su báculo, la congregación comenzó un cántico con un significado conmovedor: “Todos somos bienvenidos”.“Tuvimos 14 personas confirmadas o recibidas en la Iglesia Episcopal”, según dijo Vivian. “Me impactó la diversidad de los confirmandos. Había latinos, afroamericanos, homosexuales; había un grupo de cinco personas, de veintitantos años, provenientes de la Iglesia de las Asambleas de Dios”.Y añadió, riéndose por lo bajo: “alguien me dijo después del oficio, que durante las confirmaciones y recepciones yo parecía un papá orgulloso”.Muchos en la congregación “tuvieron lágrimas en los ojos” durante el sermón de Talton, un mensaje de inclusión, añadió la Rda. Deb DeBoer, pastora presbiteriana que sirve como ministra auxiliar en San Pablo y está desarrollando el ministerio latino de la congregación. “Él repitió varias veces que todos son bienvenidos”.“Los últimos cinco meses ha sido un período emocionante para todos nosotros, en el que hemos recuperado cuatro propiedades de la Iglesia, lo cual significa que cuatro congregaciones episcopales pueden ahora concentrarse en el ministerio y en el servicio, lo cual es nuestro propósito”, dijo Talton.DeBoer, al igual que los otros, dijo que ella se unió a la [congregación] de La Gracia en 2012 debido a su espíritu de inclusión. “Tuve la sensación inmediata de que  ‘me siento en casa y ¿por qué no vine aquí antes?’ aunque yo no soy episcopal”, dijo ella durante una entrevista telefónica reciente.“Mi marido y yo habíamos estado asistiendo al culto en una iglesia presbiteriana y eso era la mejor de las opciones no extraordinarias que había en el Valle”, agregó. “Venimos de la Costa Oriental y eso no era a lo que estábamos acostumbrados. Resultaba cada vez más difícil adorar allí, y hubo un conflicto en la iglesia. Dejé de ir por casi un año, y luego alguien me invitó a La Gracia”.La celebración “no fue una típica [fiesta] de regreso para mí, porque ése nunca había sido antes mi hogar”, dijo ella refiriéndose a la iglesia. “San Pablo es excepcional en eso.  Todos nosotros veníamos de iglesias diferentes y hay un montón de personas que no venían de ninguna iglesia”.Para Philip Holt, de 53 años y guardián del obispo, la celebración de bienvenida resultó abrumadora. “Nací en Bakersfield y soy gay y tenía una meta cuando era más joven que era irme del pueblo”, dijo durante una reciente entrevista telefónica desde su casa.“Descubrí a la Iglesia Episcopal cuando vivía en Los Ángeles. Luego me encontré de regreso en Bakersfield, donde nunca había pensado estar, y me resigné al hecho de que nunca me iba a vincular a una iglesia en esta comunidad”, afirmó.Él se incorporó a La Gracia, no sólo porque la congregación era acogedora, sino también porque estaba concentrada en la misión y el servicio comunitario. “El tiempo es apropiado para que sigamos creciendo”, dijo. “Es muy emocionante, es el momento para ello porque [la inclusión] se acaba de convertir en una fuerza muy pujante: casi como un movimiento en algunos aspectos.“Me resulta increíblemente gratificante formar parte de una comunidad que crece y no tener dudas de que el Espíritu de Dios es su centro y el fundamento por el cual se edifica tu comunidad”.Nathan Boles, de 28 años, que fue bautizado de niño en San Pablo, dijo que dejó la iglesia cuando Mark Lawrence era el rector (1997-2007). “Era terrible la manera en que las personas se volvían unas contra otras”, recordaba él. Lawrence terminó por convertirse en obispo de Carolina del Sur en 2008 y en octubre de 2012 buscó desafiliar la diócesis de la Iglesia Episcopal.Pero Boles, profesor de una universidad comunitaria, “quería estar allí para el primer sermón del 7 de julio, el primer domingo después que recuperamos el edificio”.Ese primer domingo: “no sabía qué esperar, excepto que estaba de vuelta en los viejos bancos”, dijo “Me sentí anonadado por lo que vi y sentí y por lo verdaderamente inclusivos que son. Era una iglesia sincera para con Dios en el intento de servir a Dios y a todo el mundo. Pensé, caramba, he oído decir eso tantas veces, pero nunca lo había visto realmente manifiesto. Nunca pensé que vería en Bakersfield que eso en verdad tiene lugar”.  Él escribió un artículo como columnista invitado para el Bakersfield Californian acerca de sus experiencias.Un ‘cambio dramático’: iglesias recobradas reconsideran el foco y la misiónPara muchas iglesias que se reunían en locales alternativos, el regreso les presentaba interesantes desafíos —tanto física como espiritualmente.Cuando la Rda. Kathie Galicia recibió las llaves de la iglesia de San Francisco [St. Francis Church] en Turlock, ella y un “pequeño ejército” de voluntarios disponían solamente de dos días para tenerla lista para una primera eucaristía el 2 de junio.Ella “estaba maravillada con todo, desde una gran pila bautismal de mármol hasta el hermoso cirio pascual que tenía al lado”, pero recordaba su preocupación respecto al regreso. Viniendo de un espacio abierto a la estructura de una iglesia formal, ¿seríamos capaces de seguir concentrándonos en el trabajo social de la comunidad?”Su preocupación se disipó rápidamente, cuando la congregación “cocinó y sirvió una comida en la Misión del Evangelio en Turlock” y cuando pasó “un 4 de julio muy caluroso distribuyendo agua fría gratuita a los espectadores y participantes del desfile, al tiempo que desplegaba orgullosamente nuestra bandera que simplemente dice: ‘Iglesia episcopal de San Francisco: ¡Todos son bienvenidos!’”.En la iglesia de San Miguel [St. Michael’s] en Ridgecrest, [cuya congregación leal] se reunió por primera vez el 2 de junio y celebró su regreso al hogar el 23 de ese mes, la Rda. Linda Huggard dijo que una tentación para las congregaciones que regresan podría ser el creer que el próximo paso tiene que ser “una gran cosa.“Pero me acuerdo de todo lo que hemos hecho aquí en San Miguel, limpiar, pintar, arreglar los jardines, mudar muebles, resolver el aire acondicionado, tratar con el banco, con la compañía que procesa los desechos y con la compañía de electricidad, la PG&E [Pacific Gas & Electric], y que esto es todo ministerio… y sencillamente el proporcionar un lugar cómodo”, afirmó.“Y ése bien podría ser nuestro legado, al igual que todas esas cosas importantes como la liturgia, la teología y la política, y bien puede ser que sea lo que la gente recuerde cuando ya no estemos, que fuimos un lugar acogedor, no poca cosa”.La iglesia, que se había congregado previamente como Los Fieles Difuntos [All Souls] en el edificio de la sociedad histórica local, celebró el 11 de julio la primera boda gay de la diócesis de San Joaquín, ya que, mediante dos fallos, el Tribunal Supremo de EE.UU. anuló el 26 de junio partes de la Ley en Defensa del Matrimonio (DOMA, por su sigla en inglés) y declaró inconstitucional la controversial Proposición 8 de California, allanando así el camino para el matrimonio de homosexuales.La DOMA le negaba beneficios federales a parejas del mismo sexo; la Proposición 8 prohibía el matrimonio de los homosexuales. Esas decisiones [del Supremo] allanaron el camino para que Kent Birch, el guardián del Obispo, y Steve Howe, su pareja de muchos años, se casaran legalmente.“La boda fue realmente alegre y divertida porque todo el mundo en la parroquia se reunió y les hizo una recepción. La comunidad les llevó una tarta de bodas y adornos y flores”, añadió Huggard.Pero las festividades fueron agridulces y duraron poco, ya que Birch, que había estado batallando con el cáncer, murió nueve días después, el 20 de julio. La congregación se reunió para un oficio en su memoria el día 23, explicó ella.No pudimos comunicarnos con Howe para que nos hiciera un comentario.“Fue realmente bueno que [el fallo sobre] la DOMA se aprobara justo a tiempo para que ellos se casaran”, dijo Huggard. “Habían estado juntos por más de 20 años. Pudieron casarse, y ordenar legalmente todos sus asuntos, de manera que su cónyuge pudiera heredar su casa”.Muchas más direcciones para el ministerio de la ‘iglesia roja’ en SonoraEn Sonora, un cambio de nombre y una mudanza el 1 de julio, de un estudio de yoga adaptado a la histórica ‘iglesia roja’ del pueblo, han sido tan llamativos como innovadores, según el Rdo. Eldon Anderson (“Andy”), sacerdote encargado de la congregación.El estudio de yoga estaba localizado en la vecina comunidad de Jamestown, (donde) “teníamos que cubrir muchísimos espejos” para hacer la iglesia, bromeó Anderson. “En ese tiempo éramos Santa María de la Montaña [St. Mary in the Mountains]”, localizada a unos 80 kilómetros al nordeste de la sede diocesana en Modesto.Ahora, una corta mudanza de unos cinco kilómetros y el cambio de nombre a Santiago Apóstol [St. James],  ha significado un aumento de la visibilidad y de las posibilidades de ministerio, pero no [un cambio] en “nuestra firme creencia de que nuestro Dios es un Dios de amor y compasión que acoge a todo el mundo, sin excepciones”, añadió.La congregación planea una celebración para festejar el regreso y una eucaristía a las 4:00 P.M. del domingo 8 de septiembre y toda la comunidad está invitada.“Tenemos a personas que residen en Sonora y la zona circundante que asisten a la iglesia episcopal como su iglesia de elección y están entusiasmados de ver que las puertas de la iglesia episcopal de Santiago Apóstol están abiertas para todos los que deseen entrar para adorar”, puntualizó. Y así lo hacen, los turistas con frecuencia se detienen a fotografiar el edificio o entran durante el culto para ver la iglesia, construida en 1860.“Este edificio se incluye en toda la propaganda que se dirige a los turistas”, explicó Anderson. “Tenemos cuatro organizaciones que alquilan nuestro salón parroquial y tenemos programada una serie sinfónica que tendrá dos funciones  en la iglesia el año próximo”.Está en marcha un proyecto para actualizar los folletos de la iglesia para recorridos turísticos. La nueva localización “aumenta nuestra visibilidad que, a su vez, aumenta nuestras oportunidades para un ministerio en muchas más direcciones”, señaló.Otras propiedades en disputas a través de la diócesis están en varias etapas de litigio, según el canciller de la diócesis Michael Glass. Otra propiedad de la diócesis, San Pablo [St. Paul’s], en Modesto, fue devuelta el 1 de julio de 2009, antes del litigio.“Partiendo de nuestros éxitos en los tribunales a principios de esta primavera, recobramos exitosamente cinco propiedades parroquiales durante el verano en condiciones relativamente buenas”, dijo Glass el 12 de agosto en un correo electrónico a ENS.Una quinta congregación, en Delano, fue devuelta a la diócesis; el actual ministerio sigue allí, dijeron unos funcionarios diocesanos.“Sin embargo, aún tenemos cinco casos más para contender y resolver, que incluyen aproximadamente otras 33 propiedades, entre ellas el Campamento y Centro de Conferencia, y la catedral, junto con las cuentas de inversiones diocesanas que le están relacionadas”, afirmó. “Es probable que la mayoría o la totalidad de los cinco casos pendientes vayan a juicio, el primero de los cuales está fijado para principios de enero”.–La Rda. Pat McCaughan es corresponsal de Episcopal News Service y está radicada en Los Ángeles. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Youth Minister Lorton, VA Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab center_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Por Pat McCaughanPosted Aug 16, 2013 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS La inclusión y la diversidad distinguen el regreso de las iglesias de San Joaquín Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs last_img read more

La Obispa Primada aborda el problema de la nacionalidad en…

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Por Lynette Wilson Posted Jan 28, 2015 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Albany, NY Latin America, Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 La Obispa Primada aborda el problema de la nacionalidad en la República Dominicana Un prejuicio histórico y la demanda de mano de obra migratoria ofrecen una perspectiva de la crisis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Submit a Press Release Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Tags Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA La obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori predicó a mediados de diciembre en la iglesia de la Santa Cruz en Santa Fe, región de San Pedro de Macorís, que una vez fue el centro de la región azucarera de la República Dominicana. Foto de Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service – Santo Domingo, República Dominicana] Una gran concurrencia acudió a saludar a la obispa primada Katharine Jefferts Schori a mediados de diciembre en la iglesia de la Santa Cruz, en Santa Fe, en lo que una vez fuera el centro de la región azucarera de la República Dominicana en San Pedro de Macorís.Jefferts Schori predicaría después, pero primero su programa incluía un conversatorio con la comunidad inmigrante acerca de su experiencia a raíz del veredicto del Tribunal Constitucional en 2013 que anuló la ciudadanía de unos 200.000 dominicanos de origen haitiano, muchos de ellos mujeres y niños.“La realidad actual es que hay generaciones de personas con antepasados haitianos en la República Dominicana; hijos, nietos e incluso bisnietos nacido en la RD a los que ahora les han dicho que no son ciudadanos, lo cual significa que ahora no pueden obtener pasaportes (o) teléfonos celulares, porque no tienen números de identificación”, dijo Jefferts Schori en una entrevista con Episcopal News Service. “En muchos casos han eliminado o invalidado sus registros de nacimiento. No pueden asistir a la escuela, no pueden ir a la universidad, no pueden obtener préstamos; simplemente no pueden funcionar en las áreas normales de la sociedad.“No sólo están indocumentados, sino que son ‘de-documentados’ “.El dictamen del tribunal en 2013 se produjo tres años después de que la República Dominicana cambiara su constitución y eliminara el ius soli, el derecho de cualquier persona nacida en el territorio de un Estado a su nacionalidad o ciudadanía —un derecho prácticamente universal en América. El veredicto, o dictamen de 2013, llevaba más lejos el cambio constitucional, haciéndolo retroactivo a 1929 y despojando de la ciudadanía a tres generaciones de personas nacidas en la República Dominicana.“La desnacionalización impuesta por el dictamen es un acto de injusticia e iniquidad; son dominicanos que han sido desposeídos por la sentencia”, dijo Julio Holguín, obispo [episcopal] de la República Dominicana, quien desde el comienzo ha sido parte de un comité de solidaridad compuesto por abogados, activistas y académicos que han condenado la decisión del tribunal y defienden los derechos de los afectados.“Como Iglesia nos sentimos muy comprometidos y obligados a ser la voz de los que no tienen voz”.Ocho meses después del dictamen, en mayo de 2014, luego de intensa presión política y de llamados internacionales a la justicia, el presidente [de la república] presentó y el Congreso dominicano aprobó una ley que permitía a los hijos de migrantes “irregulares”, o de presuntos no residentes “de tránsito” que tuvieran certificaciones de nacimiento, convertirse en ciudadanos, y los que carecieran [de esa certificación] solicitar residencia legal y posteriormente la ciudadanía.La ley de mayo de 2014 se aplicaría a unas 20.000 personas, lo cual, dicen los críticos, es una cifra muy exigua.Sin una certificación de nacimiento, una persona no puede obtener un carnet de identidad, que es requisito para estudiar, para solicitar un empleo digno, para casarse, para inscribir los hijos [en el registro civil], para tener derecho a seguros estatales de salud y a pensiones, así como para abrir una cuenta bancaria, solicitar un pasaporte, participar en las elecciones e incluso para ser bautizado.Sin embargo, obtener una certificación de nacimiento puede ser un proceso arbitrario y costoso en la República Dominicana, dada la actual inclinación derechista y el sentimiento antiinmigrante que se deja sentir con vistas a las elecciones presidenciales de 2016. Es ya una tarea ardua en un país en desarrollo con procedimientos de archivo irregulares, que se hacen más difíciles en pequeños pueblos y zonas rurales donde los obreros siguen viviendo en bateyes —las comunidades informales que crecieron en torno a las plantaciones de caña de azúcar, donde solían vivir los inmigrantes haitianos y donde personas pobres y marginadas siguen viviendo mucho después del colapso de la industria azucarera.En la iglesia de la Santa Cruz, una joven, Linda, de 24 años y madre de dos niños, compartió su historia de vivir sin una certificación de nacimiento y, por tanto, sin un documento de identidad, que necesita para continúe su educación y para inscribir los nacimientos de sus hijos, un niño de 1 año y una niña de 5, nacidos ambos en la República Dominicana, uno de ellos de padre dominicano, el otro de haitiano.Linda conserva un comunicado de la Secretaría de Educación en el que le dicen que ella no puede continuar sus estudios en una escuela nocturna sin una certificación de nacimiento, una fotocopia del carnet de identidad de su madre emitido por el gobierno dominicano en 2005 y un “hago constar” firmado y acuñado con el sello de la parroquia catolicorromana que confirme su nacimiento y en 1990 y la identidad de su madre.Sin un abogado que la ayude a abrirse camino en [el laberinto de] la burocracia y en lo que los activistas, abogados y miembros del Comité Pastoral sobre Inmigración de la Diócesis de la República Dominicana describen como un proceso arbitrario, la vida de Linda y la de sus dos hijos probablemente permanecerá en un limbo.Otros en situaciones semejantes o con miembros de su familia afectados se encontraban en el grupo de más de 250 personas temerosas de compartir públicamente sus historias. No obstante, luego de la reunión, afuera de la iglesia durante la eucaristía, ellas se aventuraron a hablar con la esperanza de encontrar alguna ayuda. Al igual que Linda, muchos buscaban legitimar su residencia a fin de estudiar, trabajar en la economía regular y proporcionarles una mejor vida a sus familias. Sin una certificación de nacimiento y una nacionalidad, son apátridas, “aquellos a los que ningún estado considera un ciudadano del país conforme al funcionamiento de sus leyes”.Se calcula que hay unos 10 millones de apátridas en todo el mundo, muchos de los cuales han sido empujados a ese estado por la guerra, y otros debido a la migración económica, según cifras del Alto Comisionado de las Naciones Unidas para los Refugiados, organismo éste que en 2014 inició una campaña de 10 años al objeto de erradicar este problema.Además de la labor del UNHCR, la carencia de nacionalidad ha captado la atención de la Red Internacional de la Familia Anglicana, que apoya la campaña a favor de la inscripción de nacimiento universal, lo cual significa que apoya los empeños que se llevan a cabo a nivel mundial para garantizar el cumplimiento de este requisito en países que reconocen la Convención de los Derechos del Niño, de 1989. La República Dominicana es signataria de la convención y por consiguiente conviene con el Artículo 7 en que los niños tienen el derecho a ser inscritos inmediatamente allí donde, de otro modo, podrían convertirse en apátridas.Dicho eso, Naciones Unidas ha resistido el emprender una acción formal contra la República Dominicana, que no es parte de la convención de 1954 ni de la de 1961 sobre la condición de los apátridas; y el país ha ignorado intentos legales internacionales previos de proteger los derechos de los dominicanos de ascendencia haitiana.En 2005, después de siete años de litigio, el Tribunal Interamericano de Derechos Humanos le ordenó a la República Dominicana que le otorgara certificaciones de nacimiento, y por tanto ciudadanía, a dos niñas dominicanas de nacimiento y ascendencia haitiana.El tribunal llegó a la conclusión de que la República Dominicana “había violado los derechos de las niñas de ascendencia haitiana y las había convertido en apátridas al rehusar emitirles sus certificación de nacimiento debido a su raza”. Además, el dictamen le exigía a la República Dominicana que reformara la política pública para abordar la discriminación histórica en sus procedimientos de inscripción de nacimientos: para emitir certificaciones de nacimiento a los niños independientemente de su estatus migratorio o de la raza de sus padres, así como para reformar el sistema educativo.En un comunicado de prensa publicado inmediatamente después del fallo del tribunal en octubre de 2005, uno de los demandantes predijo la importancia histórica del dictamen.“Este fallo fundamental cambiará a la República Dominicana tal como Brown v. Board cambió los Estados Unidos”, dijo Laurel Fletcher, directora del Consultorio Jurídico Internacional de Derechos Humanos de la Universidad de California, adscrito a la Escuela de Derecho de Berkeley. Pero eso no sucedió.El obispo de la República Dominicana Julio Holguín y miembros del comité de solidaridad celebraron una conferencia de prensa el 14 de enero para denunciar un dictamen reciente de la junta electoral de invalidar los documentos de identidad de 2 millones de personas.En 2007, la Junta Central Electoral, que además de organizar y regular las elecciones, supervisa el programa nacional de identificación del país, puso en vigor una resolución que limitaba el acceso a las certificaciones de nacimiento y carnets de identidad del gobierno a dominicanos de ascendencia haitiana. El 14 de enero, Holguín y otros miembros del comité de solidaridad sostuvieron una conferencia de prensa en la que denunciaron una reciente decisión de la junta electoral de invalidar los documentos de identidad de 2 millones de personas “prosiguiendo así con la obra iniciada por el dictamen de 2007”.Décadas de cambios legislativos y de políticas administrativas destinadas a limitar el acceso a la ciudadanía han complicado aún más un sistema que ya era complicado e injusto.“Los problemas de justicia son enormes. Los tribunales de derechos humanos en Latinoamérica han dictaminado que esto es ilegal y le han dicho a la RD que tiene que cambiar sus leyes. Pero hasta ahora el gobierno en la RD ha resistido todos esos esfuerzos por cambiar la interpretación de la ley, negando que hayan violado los pactos de derechos humanos en América Latina. No resulta claro que vaya a ver alguna solución real, rápidamente”, dijo Jefferts Schori, durante su visita de mediados de diciembre.“Es obvio que si la gente cuenta con los recursos económicos para litigar, con frecuencia pueden obtener alguna satisfacción. Pero eso suele ser muy costoso y toma mucho tiempo y claramente muchas personas de clase obrera simplemente no pueden hacerle frente”.Numéricamente, la Diócesis Episcopal de Haití es la más grande la Iglesia Episcopal; y la Diócesis de la República Dominicana es una de las diócesis de más rápido crecimiento en la IX Provincia, que abarca [parte de] América Latina. Luego del dictamen del Tribunal Constitucional en 2013, el Consejo Ejecutivo sugirió que la Obispa Primada viajara a la República Dominicana en una misión en busca de información precisa.Mediante su visita, que incluyó informes del comité pastoral de la diócesis, una visita a Centro Bonó, una organización no gubernamental auspiciada por jesuitas, y conversaciones informales con periodistas, académicos y abogados, que definieron la situación “como una amenaza a la democracia”, la Obispa Primada esperaba a hacer a toda la Iglesia consciente de la situación en la República Dominicana.“En verdad la educación ayuda a las personas a llevar una mejor labor de promoción social con sus propios legisladores. Creo que nuestro propio gobierno tiene alguna posibilidad de ejercer presión sobre el gobierno dominicano. Creo que el cambió advendrá a partir de la presión internacional”, dijo Jefferts Schori.“Las relaciones comerciales entre la RD, EE.UU. y otras naciones desarrolladas van en aumento y en algún momento la presión económica, la presión económica y política, tiene muchas posibilidades de tener un efecto”.A semejanza de los más de 11 millones de inmigrantes indocumentados que han cruzado la frontera de Estados Unidos para encontrar trabajo, se calcula que 1 millón de haitianos ha cruzado la frontera de 273 kilómetros que separa a Haití de la República Dominicana. Las similitudes no terminan aquí: recientemente, los menores han estado cruzando la frontera en cifras récord, y aumentaron las tensiones después de que varios pescadores haitianos fueran arrestados en aguas dominicanas cerca de Pedernales, un pueblo de la costa del Caribe y el punto fronterizo más al sur [entre las dos naciones].“Ocasionalmente surgen conflictos en la frontera. Particularmente cuando está abierta para facilitar a comerciantes de ambos lados que vendan sus productos”, dijo Holguín, añadiendo que en este caso hubo protestas frente al consulado dominicano en Haití. La protesta terminó luego de la liberación de los pescadores. Y muchos haitianos cruzan la frontera durante los días feriados, lo cual aumenta el tráfico y las posibilidades de conflicto.Adicionalmente, meses de constantes y violentas protestas en Haití —en que se pedía la celebración de elecciones aplazadas por mucho tiempo y la renuncia del presidente— y la reciente disolución del parlamento haitiano han generado mayores tensiones en ambos lados de la frontera.“La situación política en Haití se ha hecho difícil… lo cual preocupa a algunos sectores del lado dominicano”, opinó Holguín.Colonización e historia de La EspañolaLa República Dominicana, con una población de 10,4 millones de habitantes, y Haití, con una población de 10,3 millones, comparten la isla de La Española, en la cual la República Dominicana ocupa aproximadamente dos tercios de la región oriental y Haití el tercio occidental de la isla. La Española es la segunda isla en extensión territorial de las cuatro que constituyen las Antillas Mayores y la única que comparten dos naciones.En 1492, el explorador Cristóbal Colón desembarcó en La Española, en la parte que llegaría a convertirse en Haití; un año después estableció la primera colonia europea permanente en los que ahora es la República Dominicana. Los españoles colonizaron la isla y la gobernaron hasta que los franceses ocuparon la parte occidental, Haití, en 1660. Durante siglos de gobierno colonial, españoles y franceses explotaron los recursos naturales de la isla. Cuando la mano de obra se redujo, los franceses importaron millones de esclavos africanos para trabajar en las plantaciones de caña de azúcar y tabaco en lo que llegó a tenerse por la colonia más rica del Caribe. Cuando los esclavos se rebelaron, Haití se convirtió en una nación independiente en 1804, y la República Dominicana, entonces conocida como Santo Domingo, lo siguió al año siguiente.Un año después, el ejército haitiano invadió y los dos países fueron gobernados por Haití hasta 1844, una ocupación de 22 años definida como “brutal y opresiva” que sigue alimentando las tensiones y los sentimientos antihaitianos en la actualidad. Todos los años, el 27 de febrero, los dominicanos celebran su independencia, no de España, sino de Haití.Sin embargo, la independencia en Haití y la República Dominicana no produjo democracias estables. Más bien hubo periódicos regímenes de fuerza que, finalmente, dieron lugar a las muy semejantes dictaduras de François Duvalier (“Papa Doc”) y Rafael Trujillo (“El Jefe”). Este último ordenó la masacre de entre 9.000 y 20.000 haitianos que vivían a lo largo de la frontera en octubre de 1937.La masacre y el denigrante retrato que hacía Trujillo del pueblo haitiano dejó una mancha en las relaciones dominico-haitianas, dicen historiadores y políticos entre otros.El auge de la industria azucareraA partir de la década del 70 y 80 del siglo XIX, la producción azucarera comenzó a desarrollarse a escala industrial en la República Dominicana. Los haitianos finalmente se impusieron como fuerza laboral migrante; para 1952, los dos países llegaron a un acuerdo bilateral que garantizaba un continuo suministro de obreros haitianos para hacer frente a las demandas de la producción azucarera, durante la temporada anual de la zafra. En un momento llegó a haber ocho grandes plantaciones de caña de azúcar cerca de Santa Fe, donde estuvo de visita la Obispa Primada.“Muchos, muchos haitianos vinieron a trabajar a la RD en la industria azucarera bajo la dictadura de Rafael Trujillo”, dijo Jefferts Schori.Los acuerdos fueron semejantes al del programa de braceros en Estados Unidos, el cual garantizó un flujo permanente de obreros manuales provenientes de México de 1942 a 1964.“Cuando la industria azucarera se desplomó y la mano de obra ya no era necesaria, los haitianos se quedaron”, dijo ella.El Rdo. Álvaro Yepes, miembro de la comunidad pastoral de la diócesis, quien atiende el campamento del Monte de la Transfiguración en El Pedregal, dijo que al menos 19 miembros de su comunidad carecen de certificaciones de nacimiento. Además de ofrecerles oraciones y atención pastoral, él se siente frustrado por lo poco más que puede hacer por ellos, dijo.“Es fácil decir que todos somos hijos de Dios, pero difícil ponerlo en práctica” cuando no a todos los miembros de la sociedad se les trata de la misma manera, apuntó Yepes, quien agregó que, por razones prácticas, el gobierno todavía provoca resentimientos entre los dominicanos y los que se perciben como inmigrantes haitianos.En tiempos de crisis, la República Dominicana ha respondido generosamente a Haití. Dada su proximidad, fue el primer país en responder luego del catastrófico terremoto del 12 de enero de 2010 que mató entre 200.000 y 300.000 personas y destruyó totalmente partes de la capital haitiana de Puerto Príncipe y de la vecina [ciudad de] Léogâne. La República Dominicana proporcionó ayuda de emergencia, organizó voluntarios y, lo más significativo, abrió la frontera en Jimaní, a 64 kilómetros al este de Puerto Príncipe, para [dejar entrar] a haitianos que huían del desastre.Se calcula que 1 millón de haitianos huyó a la República Dominicana, duplicando así el tamaño de la población inmigrante. De los 2 millones de haitianos que viven en la República Dominicana, 70.000 se encuentran allí legalmente, según los datos de Human Rights Watch.Frontera y problemas compartidosHaití está clasificado como un país de bajos ingresos donde el 58,5 por ciento de la población vive en la pobreza; en comparación, la República Dominicana se clasifica como un país de altos a medianos ingresos, con un 40,9 por ciento de la población que vive en la pobreza, según datos del Banco Mundial.Tanto la economía haitiana como la dominicana dependen de remesas ganadas por inmigrantes que trabajan en el exterior y les envían ayuda a sus familias en el país. Las remesas constituyen el 7,3 por ciento de la economía dominicana y el 21,1 por ciento de la economía haitiana, según datos del Banco MundialSe calcula que en Estados Unidos residen un millón y medio de dominicanos y unos 600.000 haitianos.“Cuando nuestro sistema económico depende de la capacidad de transporte y de la posibilidad de moverse de las personas que quieren trabajar, así como de la necesidad de las personas de mudarse por falta de oportunidades o (debido a) la violencia, violencia estatal o no estatal, hemos de admitir que la manera que teníamos de hacer las cosas ya no funciona”, dijo Jefferts Schori. “Fíjense en la Filipinas: su economía depende de su mano de obra migrante (y) eso es cada vez más cierto de algunas naciones de América Latina”.La República Dominicana ha sido clasificada recientemente entre las economías de más rápido crecimiento del mundo, con un promedio de 5,5 de aumento anual del producto interno bruto a lo largo de 20 años. Sin embargo, según algunos estudios, el mercado laboral ha permanecido estancado, con obreros empleados en gran medida en trabajos de bajos salarios o en la economía informal.En ese mismo período de dos décadas, las remesas —jornales transferidos al país por trabajadores migrantes— aumentaron constantemente alcanzando el pico del 11,4 de PIB en 2004, y descendiendo al 6,5 por ciento en 2011; la desigualdad en el ingreso ha aumentado en la última década.Que la economía crezca, pero la demanda de trabajo y los salarios permanezcan estancados atiza los fuegos del resentimiento, el cual ha aumentado notablemente desde 2013, dijo Franklin Paula, que enseña inglés en una escuela episcopal en Santa Cruz.Ha habido manifestaciones en respuesta a incidentes que se perciben motivados por prejuicios raciales, por ejemplo la quema de una bandera en mayo de 2014, dijo Paula, que nació en la República Dominicana, pero cuya familia es de Antigua.Y a los haitianos, señalaba él, que vienen a la República Dominicana hablando dos o tres idiomas, con frecuencia prefieren contratarlos en los balnearios que sirven a turistas europeos y norteamericanos, lo cual da lugar a mayores resentimientos entre los obreros dominicanos que devengan bajos jornales.— Lynette Wilson es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Belleville, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listinglast_img read more

Presiding Bishop moderates WCC panel on peace, security in the…

first_img Press Release Service Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Submit a Job Listing During a July 2011 visit to the Democratic Republic of Congo, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, the Rev. Margaret Rose and the Rev. Petero Sabune stop to say a prayer with widows in a community near the Anglican University of Congo in Bunia. Widows are considered outcasts in many Congolese communities. Photo: Matthew Davies[Episcopal News Service] The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is ranked among the world’s poorest countries, and since the former Belgian colony fell into the hands of corrupt and power-hungry leaders following its independence in 1960, the Congolese have rarely experienced life without conflict.A May 27-29 World Council of Churches’ conference in Geneva, Switzerland, includes religious leaders, victims of war, former child soldiers, United Nations representatives, members of relief agencies, and post-conflict practitioners, all seeking solutions for peace and security in the war-weary nation. Participants at the event are addressing violent conflict, electoral integrity, environmental protection and human rights.Quoting from Isaiah 58, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said: “The peacemaking work that we are all about is repairing [the] breach, that gap in abundant life that Jesus believes is the birthright of all human beings. Repairing that breach is what we are about and why we are here.”Jefferts Schori was moderating a panel at the conference that focused on international cooperation for peace building and reconstruction. She visited the DRC for six days in July 2011 to spend time with the victims of war, orphaned children and women who’ve been raped by rebel soldiers leading to stigmatization and abandonment by their families and communities. Jefferts Schori witnessed how the Province L’Eglise Anglicane du Congo (Anglican Church of Congo) and its partners are committed to serving the vulnerable, needy and traumatized in the Central African nation of some 72 million people.“It’s incredibly powerful to see that work going on and to hear the women’s stories and to hear about how the churches are supporting the healing of communities,” Jefferts Schori said in opening the WCC panel.She described how The Episcopal Church has been involved in the DRC for many years through advocacy and partnerships. “One of the ways that we try to improve our constructive support is by gathering people who work on issues relating to the Congo,” she said. “It is a way to keep everyone aware of the latest developments. We have at times called for a week of prayer … to raise awareness among our own members” and to encourage advocacy.Episcopal Relief & Development partners with the Anglican Church of the Congo on programs that support post-conflict healing. Through Ensemble Nous Pouvons, or Together We Can, church partners have mobilized community-based groups to identify their existing resources, along with actions they can take to foster development.The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society and Episcopal Relief & Development also have supported the work of Union des Femmes pour la Paix et la Promotion Social, or United Women for Peace and Social Promotion, in medical and psychological healing and social reintegration.Following independence in 1960, the Democratic Republic of Congo – about the same size as the continent of Europe – faced more than three decades of gross corruption under the presidency of Joseph Mobutu, who was supported by the United States as a “friendly tyrant” for his resistance to the Soviet Union. Rebels led by Laurent Kabila overthrew Mobutu in 1997.Initially raising hopes, Kabila was installed as the new president and changed the country’s name from Zaire to the Democratic Republic of Congo. But his allies became enemies, and the DRC entered five years of brutal war in which an estimated 5.4 million people died. When he was assassinated in 2001, Kabila was succeeded by his son, Joseph Kabila, who remains the DRC’s president in a power-sharing government that includes former rebels.The war was fueled largely by a scramble for the country’s vast mineral resources. Rebels in the east, supported by Tutsi militias and neighboring countries Uganda and Rwanda, battled the Kinshasa-based government, backed by Hutu militias and Angola, Namibia and Zimbabwe. In October 2004, the human rights group Amnesty International announced that 40,000 cases of rape had been reported over the previous six years.As the DRC – which hosts the United Nations’ largest peacekeeping team – attempts to recover from what has been dubbed the bloodiest conflict since World War II, rebel activity still roils the east of the country and is synonymous with gender-based violence, particularly in rural villages. Some reports reveal stories of rebel soldiers raping women while their husbands are forced to watch, then killing family members and carrying out acts of cannibalism.A major consequence of the Congo’s war and the associated atrocities is the plight of some 3 million internally displaced people and refugees who have fled to camps in neighboring countries.In early March, eight Episcopalians traveled to Kenya and Rwanda to learn about refugee resettlement today through the lens of Congolese refugees on a #ShareTheJourney pilgrimage organized by Episcopal Migration Ministries, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s refugee resettlement service.In 2014, Episcopal Migration Ministries and its partners helped to resettle 5,155 of the tens of thousands of refugees who came to the United States through the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees’ screening process. The agency will work to serve as many people this year, as the United States plans to resettle 70,000 refugees. Many of those refugees will come from the Democratic Republic of Congo.In Geneva, Jefferts Schori said she was struck by the reflections and the vision that Christians hold together of a world without violence. She urged those attending the WCC conference to consider how they might better partner in peacemaking and for positive action.The conference follows on from a 2009 visit to the Congo by a WCC delegation, identification by the 2013 WCC Assembly of the Congo as a “priority country” in its international work, and an April 2014 visit by WCC general secretary, the Rev. Olav Fykse Tveit, to an ecumenical forum in the nation’s capital, Kinshasa.Tveit, in his opening remarks at the Geneva conference, said the time is ripe “to bring our discussions into action.” Although for many years the Congo has been “a context of suffering,” he said, “this gathering is a sign of hope for another story, another reality, another future” for the nation as churches decide how to use their resources together for peace, security and sustainable development there.The conference concludes on May 29 with a look towards the 2016 DRC presidential elections and the future work of an ecumenical forum on issues relating to the DRC.— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter of the Episcopal News Service. Submit an Event Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Anglican Communion, Ecumenical & Interreligious, Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Africa, Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Pittsburgh, PA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books By Matthew DaviesPosted May 28, 2015 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Presiding Bishop moderates WCC panel on peace, security in the Congo Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FLlast_img read more

Western Louisiana: Bishop says Christians must ‘denounce this hate and…

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Posted Aug 14, 2017 Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Racial Justice & Reconciliation Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY [Huffington Post] The nation and the world watched in heartsick disbelief this weekend as white supremacists gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia. Waving Nazi flags and raising the Nazi salute, the mob could not have made its racist ideology clearer.Chillingly, the mob chanted “blood and soil,” a notorious catchphrase of the Third Reich. “Blood” refers to racial distinctions and asserts the superiority of whites over all others. Suppression of non-whites in a struggle for racial dominance is part of this distorted worldview.Read the full essay here.The Rt. Rev. Jake Owensby An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VA Western Louisiana: Bishop says Christians must ‘denounce this hate and violence’ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Charlottesville, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Press Release Service Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VAlast_img read more

Apopka Then and Now needs your help

first_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Please enter your comment! TAGSApopka Then and Now Previous articleWilcox withdraws from US Senate RaceNext articleSport Clips Haircuts: It’s Good to be a Guy in Apopka Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook groups serve a lot of purposes for communities. They can be a sounding board for issues. They can effect change. They can even win or lose elections. And in some cases, these groups can organize community action.However it is rare when a Facebook Group leaves its keyboards, PC’s and laptops and helps out its community in a more tangible, physical way and helps out in the community.  That’s what Apopka Then and Now is doing tomorrow.Gene Knight wrote this on Then and Now’s Facebook Group page today:“I have citizen of Apopka needing a back yard clean up… mainly grass mowed, small trees cut down etc. It’s just too much for one person to get back in shape. I’m looking to see if we can do it. It won’t be to bad if we get enough people to help. If you are able to help, please let me know. We will be serving lunch too. It’s just one way we would like to help citizens of Apopka in need. I know it’s short notice but it is what it is. It will be tomorrow starting at 8am.”Knight started the group in December of 2015, but since mid-April it has increased its membership from about 500 to over 2,000.  This small group, dedicated to the history of Apopka, has transformed into an all-encompassing group covering a diversity of issues.And now it is going into the community.“We are doing it because we want to help citizens in Apopka that are in need of help and to get the community involved to help make Apopka a great place to live,” said Knight. “If we can get everyone to help one person that just can’t get out and do yard work because of medical reasons or whatever the case may be, it will make a difference . I love getting out and doing what I can do in the community and just seeing people smile and know someone cares. I love helping people.”Misha Corbett agrees.“People helping each other is what builds a strong community, said Corbett, one of the administrators at Apopka Then and Now. ”And we want to build a strong community in Apopka.” The Anatomy of Fear LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

There is a solution for male pelvic pain

first_img Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. TAGSFlorida Hospital – Apopka Previous articleTalk to State Rep. Jennifer Sullivan this monthNext articleCookies and milk with a cop coming Saturday Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name herecenter_img Focus on your healthFrom Florida Hospital ApopkaIt took Michael Contreras 18 years to find relief for a problem that most men don’t dare talk about: chronic pelvic pain. Michael, 57, was unsure what was causing the pain but thought it stemmed from complications of a past vasectomy. Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Anatomy of Fear “It felt like someone was gripping and squeezing my groin 24/7,” says Michael. “It felt like a golf ball was stuck down there.”A small percentage of men who’ve undergone a vasectomy, hernia surgery or kidney removal or experienced scrotal or pelvic trauma or recurrent testicular infections may suffer from chronic testicular pain. The pain can range from mild irritation to severe, debilitating discomfort. Michael was placed on several medications to deal with the pain. Over time, the side effects negatively affected the self-employed, then-single father of three.“The medication made me sluggish, and it was difficult to have a normal day,” remembers Michael. “My quality of life was horrible.”TURNING THE CORNERAfter visiting numerous physicians, urologists and pain specialists, Michael was referred to Zamip Patel, MD, urologist, at Florida Hospital.“Chronic pelvic pain is more common than many people think,” says Dr. Patel. He suspected Michael’s discomfort was caused by nerve entrapment in his spermatic cord, a bundle of fibers and tissues running through the abdominal region to the testicles.To determine whether that was the case, Dr. Patel performed a nerve block last May. The procedure delivers local anesthetics and anti-inflammatory agents to a predefined location along the spermatic cord. The nerve block interrupts the pathway of the nerve, temporarily stopping the cycle of pain.“We do this spermatic cord block so that we can be sure that if we do an operation, it will work,” says Dr. Patel.Michael’s nerve block was successful, so Dr. Patel proceeded to perform a microsurgical denervation, or neurolysis, of the spermatic cord. The technique involves an operating microscope and a small, 1- to 2-centimeter incision in the groin to remove causes of pain. Dr. Patel says patients should feel complete relief a month after surgery.ENJOYING SIMPLE THINGS AGAIN“Dr. Patel was a true blessing,” says Michael, who’s now medication- and pain-free. “This type of stuff needs to be out in the open so men know there’s a solution.”Michael attributes his strength to his spirituality and his wife of seven years, Lorie.“Now I can enjoy simple things, like going to the movies or going to dinner and not having to sit on a pillow for comfort,” explains Michael.last_img read more