Cynthia Sturgis Landrum to Speak at UE Andiron Lecture in March

first_imgCynthia Sturgis Landrum, CEO and director of the Evansville Vanderburgh Public Library, will be the speaker for the University of Evansville Andiron Lecture on March 1. The lecture will begin at 4:00 p.m., in Eykamp Hall, Room 252, in Ridgway University Center on UE’s campus. All of the Andiron lectures are free and open to the public.Landrum’s topic will be “Toward a New Nostalgia for Public Libraries: Engaging, Inquiring, and Empowering.” During her talk, she will discuss the roots of library nostalgia. When and how was our nostalgia for libraries lost? Most importantly, how can we rediscover it for the greater good of our communities?Landrum earned her bachelor’s degree in linguistics at Northwestern University, her master’s degree in library and information science at the University of Southern Mississippi, and is a doctoral candidate in managerial leadership for the information professions at Simmons College.She is councilor-at-large on the Council of the American Library Association, past president of the Arizona Library Association and former board member of the Institute for Science Education and Technology. Her professional mission is to empower individuals to reach their highest potential so they can transform communities. As one example of this commitment, she tutors K-12 students from Chicago public schools, providing homework assistance with a primary focus on reading.The Andiron Lecture series is sponsored by the William L. Ridgway College of Arts and Sciences and supported by a generous gift from Donald B. Korb. For more information, call 812-488-1070 or 812-488-2589.Cynthia Sturgis Landrum, CEO and director of the Evansville Vanderburgh Public Library, will be the speaker for the University of Evansville Andiron Lecture on March 1. The lecture will begin at 4:00 p.m., in Eykamp Hall, Room 252, in Ridgway University Center on UE’s campus. All of the Andiron lectures are free and open to the public.Landrum’s topic will be “Toward a New Nostalgia for Public Libraries: Engaging, Inquiring, and Empowering.” During her talk, she will discuss the roots of library nostalgia. When and how was our nostalgia for libraries lost? Most importantly, how can we rediscover it for the greater good of our communities?Landrum earned her bachelor’s degree in linguistics at Northwestern University, her master’s degree in library and information science at the University of Southern Mississippi, and is a doctoral candidate in managerial leadership for the information professions at Simmons College.She is councilor-at-large on the Council of the American Library Association, past president of the Arizona Library Association and former board member of the Institute for Science Education and Technology. Her professional mission is to empower individuals to reach their highest potential so they can transform communities. As one example of this commitment, she tutors K-12 students from Chicago public schools, providing homework assistance with a primary focus on reading.The Andiron Lecture series is sponsored by the William L. Ridgway College of Arts and Sciences and supported by a generous gift from Donald B. Korb. For more information, call 812-488-1070 or 812-488-2589.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Taking inclusion to the HILT

first_imgClint Smith, a Harvard Ph.D. and staff writer at The Atlantic, pointed out the subliminal messages that minority students receive at Harvard and beforehand.“They are still coming into College in the context of a world that has told them, over and over again, that they are exceptions to the rule, that they have escaped a culture or community that is laden with laziness, or saturated with violence. … Our students are told they are exceptional in ways that are meant as a compliment, but are ultimately legitimizing a larger set of oppressive conditions and social forces.”Charleston invited the panelists to come up with practical changes to help them engage with their students. Parra said that she strives to bring more critical thinking into her classroom, and to include course materials that are relevant to her students’ cultural backgrounds. “It’s not just the access to resources, but the content of those resources has to be part of the discussion,” she said.“So many young people are consumed with the idea that they have to escape the community that they came from — that place was bad and holding them back, this place is good where they can achieve mobility. We have to problematize and complicate that idea,” Smith said.Instead, students might discuss the decades of economic and policy decisions that make a place like Harvard look the way it does, he said.“Students shouldn’t have to feel that they need to leave places behind in order to be successful moving forward.” If all you’ve got is lemons, make lemonade. If what you’ve got is a pandemic that has forced all teaching and learning online for the past eight months and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future, make it an opportunity, said Harvard President Larry Bacow.“Eyes and ears forward — that imperative takes me back to elementary school. Today we are not so unlike what we were back then — eager to learn, but perhaps distracted,” Bacow told an online audience at the Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching (HILT) seminar on Oct. 16. The conditions, he said, can be ideal for creating more inclusive classrooms and more equitable instruction.“There’s not much to recommend a pandemic but it has made more dimensions of our lives visible to one another, and created opportunities for the kind of sympathy and empathy that lead one to understand and appreciate others. I imagine that many of you know more about the circumstances of your students’ lives, and the challenges they face, than you have in years past. And I imagine that they know more about the circumstances in your life — whether they be revealed in glimpses of home decor, or Zoom bombs by children and pets.”Bacow said that the work of diversity, equity, and inclusion is about making connections with and gaining understanding of one another as individuals, especially those from different backgrounds. This, he said, can ultimately lead to discussions of power and privilege.The morning panel, “A Conversation on Inclusive Excellence,” was moderated by Harvard’s chief diversity and inclusion officer Sherri Ann Charleston. In her opening remarks Charleston quoted from W.E.B. DuBois’ “The Souls of Black Folks” the unasked question that he faced as a Black intellectual: “How does it feel to be a problem?”Charleston urged teachers to treat inequality, rather than students, as the problem to be solved, and invited the panelists to examine the broader structures that might shape their students’ experience.,Anthony Jack, assistant professor of education at the Graduate School of Education, talked about the “hidden curriculum” encountered by lower-income Harvard students who are the first in their family to go to college: “That system of unwritten rules and unset expectations.” He said the divide might show up in a simple concept like “office hours”: To students whose parents didn’t attend college and who didn’t go to prep school, the very idea might seem foreign.“We expect students to know the lingo, the shorthand, the nomenclature of our campus before they arrive, and so a lot of students get tripped up on the social side of academic life,” Jack said. Campus officials, he said, need to realize that not everyone adapts quickly to a predominately wealthy and elite space. “We can create a floor for our students to stand on, rather than a ceiling to bump into.”María Luisa Parra, senior preceptor in Romance languages and literatures in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, noted that the Latinx community brings a particular set of strengths to campus by virtue of the discrimination it has experienced. “By the time they arrive at an institution like Harvard, they have made really significant efforts to succeed in a system that, through different mechanisms, pushed them out systematically. But they have managed to succeed.” As a linguist, she noted that Spanish is taught at Harvard as a second language, but not often spoken in classrooms as a primary one. She said changing this would affect the level of value and recognition that these students encounter. “We can create a floor for our students to stand on, rather than a ceiling to bump into.” — Anthony Jacklast_img read more

Day lily dread

first_imgBy Mark CzarnotaUniversity of GeorgiaDay lilies, with their beautiful repeating flowers, are among themost popular perennials throughout the United States.Unfortunately, weeds can be hard to control in day lilies.Established perennial broadleaf weeds can be extremely tough.The good news is that annual broadleaf and grassy weeds can beeasily controlled with mulches and the judicious use ofherbicides.As with any garden plants, planting day lilies in a proper placeis vital to growing healthy plants.Mulches are extremely helpful in preventing weeds fromgerminating. Always have a 2- to 4-inch layer of pine bark, pinestraw or shredded hardwood bark in place.Many herbicides are labeled for use on day lilies.Postemergent herbicidesSeveral postemergent grass herbicides are labeled for use in daylilies: Acclaim Extra (fenoxaprop); Envoy (clethodim); Vantage(sethoxydim); and Fusilade II, Ornamec and Grass-B-Gon(fluazifop).These grass herbicides are concentrates you mix with water andspray over the top of day lilies to control actively growinggrasses. They won’t keep seeds from germinating.Pre-emergent herbicidesPre-emergent herbicides keep many broadleaf and grass weed seedsfrom sprouting: Barricade and Factor (active ingredientprodiamine); Dimension (dithiopyr); Gallery (isoxaben); Pendulum(pendimethalin); Pennant (metolachlor); granular Snapshot(isoxaben and trifluralin); Surflan (oryzalin); Treflan(trifluralin); and XL (benefin and oryzalin).You can get most of these products in both granular and sprayableform. Granular herbicides are more popular because they requireno mixing and are more forgiving when you apply it wrong.Note that these herbicides don’t control all weeds. There are nosilver bullets when it comes to weeds. Most of these chemicals orcombinations will provide 80-percent to 95-percent control of theweeds from seed.Some weeds aren’t controlled with pre-emergent herbicides, butmost of these weeds can be easily hand-removed.LimitationsThe pre-emergent herbicides listed are designed to work only ifyou apply them before the weeds germinate, and all will need tobe applied at least twice (spring and fall).Pre-emergent herbicides tend to be more useful to large growers.In the home garden, you might find hand-removing weeds adequateand even invigorating.All of these herbicides were available when this article waswritten. But herbicide labels can change, so make sure that youread and understand the label before using any pesticide.As herbicides go off patent, many third-party manufacturers maymarket under different trade names. Glyphosate, the activeingredient in Roundup, is now available from many suppliers.The tough partNow, the tough part: Broadleaf and other perennial weeds can behard to control in day lilies.Nut sedge (Cyperus species) and Florida betony (Stachysfloridana) are two problem weeds with no selective over-the-topherbicides available to control them in day lilies.You can carefully use products that contain the glyphosate tocontrol the problem perennial weeds you can’t keep out by hand orwith mulches.To do this, carefully separate the weed foliage from the day lilyleaves. Remove as little of the weed foliage as possible, and trynot to break any leaves or stems. If you can lay the plant onbare ground or a piece of plastic, do so.Paint or spongePaint on or sponge-apply a 5-percent solution of glyphosate (6ounces of herbicide to 128 ounces of water). Make sure theproduct you use to make the solution contains 41 percent or moreglyphosate.Be careful not to get the herbicide on the day lilies. If you do,wash it off immediately. Cover the plant with paper or plasticuntil the herbicide has dried.In 10 to 14 days, the treated weeds will begin to die. If anybegin to resprout, repeat the procedure.A fairly new herbicide, Manage (halosulfuron), provides excellentcontrol of sedges (yellow and purple). It can be used as a sprayaround day lilies.(Mark Czarnota is an Extension Service horticulturist with theUniversity of Georgia College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences.)last_img read more

Switzerland dubbed best place for talented workers

first_img– Advertisement – The U.S. came in 15th, ranked behind Germany (11th), Australia (13th), and Hong Kong (14th). It was just ahead of Ireland (18th), Taiwan (20th) and the U.K (23rd).Among the bottom 10 countries were: Russia, Bulgaria, Mexico, Romania, Colombia, Brazil, Venezuela, Slovak Republic, with India and Mongolia coming out last in the ranking.Now in its seventh year, the IMD annual ranking seeks to provide a picture of leading economies’ talent pools, and therefore their global competitiveness. It does so by drawing on a mixture of hard data and surveys to measure markets.- Advertisement – Switzerland was praised for its high-quality education system and focus on apprenticeships, as well as its ability to attract overseas professionals with high living standards and strong pay packets. Denmark, meanwhile, performed well for its emphasis of equal opportunity across society, and Luxembourg ticked up followed sustained investment in its workforce over recent years.Here are the top 10 countries on the list of 63 countries, which was heavily led by Western Europe.1. Switzerland 2. Denmark 3. Luxembourg 4. Iceland 5. Sweden6. Austria 7. Norway 8. Canada 9. Singapore10. the Netherlands- Advertisement – Countries are assessed across three key criteria: ‘Investment and development’ looks at how a country fosters domestic talent; ‘Appeal’ assesses the extent to which an economy retains homegrown talent and draws international talent; and ‘Readiness’ measures the quality of skills and competences available.As with previous years, the latest study was conducted between January and April, and as such, does not fully account for the impact of the pandemic. However, Jose Caballeros, senior economist at the IMD World Competitiveness Center, told CNBC Make It the findings provide some indication of which job markets may feel the greatest social and economic fallout.“The performance of the top talent-competitive countries remains relatively strong,” said Caballeros. “It is among the other economies where we see more fluctuation.”Indonesia, which came in at position 45, and Malaysia, which was 23rd on the list, both fell in the rankings this year. That was due to “brain drain” — the emigration of educated workers away from their home country — and a reduced ability to attract foreign highly skilled workers and international managers, Caballeros said. He added that the pandemic will likely make that problem worse.Meanwhile, other countries that are largely reliant on overseas talent, such as Singapore, Australia, the U.S. and the U.K., could also see a negative impact from recent border restrictions, the report noted.But Caballeros said the pandemic has also provided a spot of opportunity for economies to invest in their people and adapt to new ways of working.“Enabling employees to acquire new or redeploy existing skills — to transition to remote working for example — will also be essential to sustaining the effectiveness of the talent pool in the near future,” he said.“This effectiveness will be necessary to tackle the new challenges that may arise following the current crisis. Facilitating the adoption of flexible new technologies will also be helpful for such economies since they will be able to be redeployed to address the needs of a continuously changing context,” Caballeros added.Don’t miss: Happiness expert: One technique for staying upbeat during the pandemicLike this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube! Switzerland has been named the best place in the world for attracting and nurturing skilled workers, even as the coronavirus pandemic weighs on many countries’ ability to win over top talent.Retaining pole position for the fourth year running, the central European nation beat out other continental neighbors including Denmark, Luxembourg, Iceland and Sweden to secure the top spot in IMD’s World Talent Ranking 2020 released Thursday.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Everything changes

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Marriott shines at Hancock County’s Night of 1,000 Stars

first_imgHunter Marriott was the $3,500 IMCA Modified feature winner at Hancock County Speedway’s 24th annual Night of 1,000 Stars special. (Photo by Chad Meyer)BRITT, Iowa (Aug. 9) – Hunter Marriott starred on a different night Thursday at Hancock County Speedway.Marriott battled Cayden Carter and Kyle Strickler before taking charge late in Thursday’s 24th annual Night of 1,000 Stars main event at Britt, earning $3,500 for the 50-lap IMCA Modified victory.“I was patient and when I had opportunities I took advantage of them,” Marriott said following his latest Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot-qualifying win. “I got to second right away after the break and passed for the lead with about eight laps to go.”Last year’s event runner-up as well as the two-time defending Night of 10,000 Stars winner, Marriott had worked his way toward the front from the 12th starting spot as early leader Strickler gave way to Carter following a restart.Carter was dominant to the mandatory pit stop on lap 25, pocketing $1,000 for leading at halfway.Marriott was up to third at that point and soon in pursuit of Strickler after the race went back to green.The last 25 laps ran caution-free and Strickler, Marriott and Carter battled back and forth the last 10 times around the oval.Strickler and Marriott touched twice racing for the lead before Marriott was able to work his way through lapped traffic and pull ahead by a couple car lengths.Carter, Strickler, Mike Mashl and Jeff Aikey completed the top five. Kelly Shryock started 19th and finished sixth.George Nordman won the  Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMod feature and $750. The $600 IMCA Sunoco Stock Car win went to Jake Masters and Cody Nielsen topped the IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks for a $500 check.Feature ResultsModifieds – 1. Hunter Marriott; 2. Cayden Carter; 3. Kyle Strickler; 4. Mike Mashl; 5. Jeff Aikey; 6. Kelly Shryock; 7. Benji LaCrosse; 8. Ethan Dotson; 9. Tim Ward; 10. Todd Van Eaton; 11. Joel Rust; 12. Jeremy Mills; 13. Clay Money; 14. Mike Mullen; 15. Corey Dripps; 16. Josh Long; 17. Tom Berry Jr.; 18. Aaron Benson; 19. Randy Foote; 20. Jason Wolla; 21. Kody Scholpp; 22. Kollin Hibdon; 23. Nick Meyer; 24. Stacey Mills; 25. Troy Swearingen; 26. Jay Noteboom; 27. Mark Noble; 28. Richie Gustin; 29. Jesse Hoeft; 30. Jimmy Gustin; 31. Ryan Ruter.Stock Cars – 1. Jake Masters; 2. Craig Berhow; 3. Heath Tulp; 4. Randy Brands; 5. Cody Frerichs; 6. Pete Alexander; 7. Kody Scholpp; 8. Scott Yale; 9. Derek Moede; 10. Jeff Dolphin; 11. Parker Slagle; 12. Andrew Borchardt; 13. Buck Schafroth.Hobby Stocks – 1. Cody Nielsen; 2. Chanse Hollatz; 3. Drew Barglof; 4. Scott Dobel; 5. Tony Smidt; 6. Blaine Hanson; 7. Ben Peterson; 8. Tommy Beekman; 9. Kenzie Ritter.Northern SportMods – 1. George Nordman; 2. Cody Thompson; 3. Mathew Hanson; 4. Johnathon Logue; 5. Colby Fett; 6. Andrew Inman; 7. Ryan Hiscocks; 8. Ethan Braaksma; 9. Nate Whitehurst; 10. Brady Joynt; 11. Brett Meyer; 12. Autumn Anderson; 13. Tyler Bragg; 14. Gerald Curry; 15. Nate VanSchepen; 16. Thomas Nelson; 17. Jeremiah LaDue; 18. Greg Magsam.last_img read more

Aston Villa 2-1 Leicester City: Villa come from behind to topple sorry Foxes

first_img1 Aston Villa came from behind to beat Leicester City 2-1 at Villa Park, as Alan Hutton’s first league goal for the club condemned the Foxes to their tenth game without a win.The Foxes took the lead with Leonardo Ulloa’s instinctive close-range finish, but were pegged back before half time when Ciaran Clark responded for the hosts.Alan Hutton’s strike fifteen minutes from time proved to be enough for Villa to secure all three points, moving Paul Lambert’s side up to 11th position in the table.Meanwhile, problems continue to mount for Nigel Pearson’s side – who had Paul Konchesky sent off late on – as the Foxes end a turbulent week at the foot of the Premier League table, four points adrift of safety.The Villains dictated the tempo of the opening stages with Christian Benteke’s dipping volley coming close to breaking the deadlock, but the visitors responded immediately with their first attack of the game, aided by an inexplicable error from Brad Guzan.The American goalkeeper fumbled an innocuous shot from Riyad Mahrez, allowing Ulloa a simple chance from close-range and the striker made no mistake, poking in his sixth league goal of the season – his first for ten matches.However Villa’s positive start was soon rewarded with an equaliser, when Clark stooped low to head past Kasper Schmeichel on 17 minutes – the defender evaded his marker with a piercing run before converting Ashley Westwood’s perfectly-weighted free-kick.The Foxes were soon appealing for a spot-kick when Guzan’s untidy challenge on Jamie Vardy inside the area sent the former Fleetwood striker tumbling to the ground, after Esteban Cambiasso’s clipped pass dissected the Villa defence.Another direct run from Mahrez down the right caused confusion among the Villa defence, but his tame strike failed to trouble Guzan.Both sides traded chances after the break with Tom Cleverley first firing well over for the hosts, before Jeffrey Schlupp failed to capitalise on an inventive one-two between David Nugent and Vardy.Benteke almost prospered from some hazardous Leicester defending, but Schmeichel stayed on his feet to deny the Belgium international with a fine stop.And the Danish keeper then kept out Gabriel Agbonlahor’s low drive with a smart save, after the Villa captain’s penetrating drive into the area.A moment of brilliance from Nugent reignited the match after a scrappy period, as the former Preston man produced a stunning volley from range forcing a back-peddling Guzan to tip the ball over in dramatic style.But Villa were soon ahead with a sweeping attack from left to right as Benteke’s floated pass found Hutton in an advanced position down the right, and the full-back showed similar composure to that of his Belgian team-mate, calmly guiding the ball past Schmeichel.Benteke should have added Villa’s third moments later but was twice denied by stunning reaction saves from Schmeichel.The visitors’ task of clinching a late equaliser was dealt a damaging blow when Konchesky was sent off after an altercation with Alan Hutton.And Villa were almost out of site after a goalmouth scramble but Schmeichel came to the rescue again – cancelling out Jack Grealish’s instinctive effort with a superb diving save.Chris Wood’s first-time strike flashed agonisingly wide as Leicester’s final chance went begging, as the Foxes remain winless since their 5-3 win against Manchester United in September. Aston Villa full-back Alan Hutton last_img read more