DONEGAL MUSICIANS RORY GALLAGHER AND JOHN CUTLIFFE LAUNCH SONG FOR GAZA

first_imgSPECIAL REPORT: Donegal musicians John Cutliffe and Rory Gallagher team up with a multitude of Irish and international talent to raise money for children in Gaza. The summer of 2014 war was devastating the Gaza strip. More than 2,000 people were killed, 600 of which were children.Donegal musician John Cutliffe was in East jerusalem when he heard that patients from Gaza were being brought to Palestinian hospitals in the area. He went for what he thought would be one visit to see if there was anything he could do. That was the start of five weeks of daily visits to three different hospitals in the area. The wounded were men, women and children. in many cases they had lost everything including most of their family members, their homes and all their belongings. John along with other volunteers would visit the patients, find out what they needed and then go shopping to find them the essentials to just get by in the new scary surroundings.The children especially moved John and he was often overcome with emotion he had to find a quiet place to break down a little. Most people needed a lot of items but all they really wanted was to have someone visit them and understand. In the weeks John and his friends were there they saw horrific injuries and many of the patients died while they were in the hospital.John wrote a song for a little girl he met there called Shyma, who symbolised the sheer horror of what was happening. She was just four and had seen most of her family killed in the explosion that injured her. She was innocent and scared and hurt. One day when John was chatting to her she finally smiled for the first time.The next morning while waiting for a lift John wrote the bare bones of the song. “The melody of the verse was there and Shyma’a smiled lyric but very little else, just a feel for what it should be,” he said.John sent the shell of the song to his friend Rory Gallagher from Kilcar, Co. Donegal in Lanzarote who finished it, making it a modern day lullaby for peace.Now John has gathered friends from the UK, Ireland and even Jerusalem to sing and play on this song. With a zero budget he and some very talented and helpful people recorded in studios all over the world to work on this song, sending tracks to John in his current home of Amman in Jordan. The final tracks are being mixed in Nashville by a top engineer.All profits from the downloads of the song will go to two charities helping children in Gaza as they face an uncertain future – The Palestinian Red Crescent and The Qattan Center for the Child.The song features talented & well known artists; Rory Gallagher. John Cutliffe, Muireann Nic Amhlaoibh, Liam O Maonlai, Donogh Hennessy, Honor Heffernan, Martin Tourish, Wee Glee Singers, Jerusalem Children’s Choir, Brian Mullan, Laurence Doherty, Clare Lindley, Claire McDaid, Kevin Cutliffe, Sophia Brock, Caroline Cutliffe. You can find more details & dates of when the song will be released on https://www.facebook.com/shymasmiledDONEGAL MUSICIANS RORY GALLAGHER AND JOHN CUTLIFFE LAUNCH SONG FOR GAZA was last modified: November 28th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:charityconflictGAZAJohn CutliffeRory Gallaghershymasmiledsonglast_img read more

White Blood Cells Walk to Infection on Tiny Legs

first_img51; How do white blood cells know where to go when infection strikes?  The cells have tiny little feet and crawl like millipedes, against the blood stream, if necessary, following signals from the infection site.  When they arrive, more signals tell them where to slip through the cells of the blood vessel to get to the job.  This amazing story was reported by Science Daily based on a press release from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel (see Wiezmann Wonder Wander).  Here’s how they described this phenomenon:How do white blood cells – immune system ‘soldiers’ – get to the site of infection or injury?  To do so, they must crawl swiftly along the lining of the blood vessel – gripping it tightly to avoid being swept away in the blood flow – all the while searching for temporary ‘road signs’ made of special adhesion molecules that let them know where to cross the blood vessel barrier so they can get to the damaged tissue.    In research recently published in the journal Immunity, Prof. Ronen Alon and his research student Ziv Shulman of the Weizmann Institute’s Immunology Department show how white blood cells advance along the length of the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels.  Current opinion maintains that immune cells advance like inchworms, but Alon’s new findings show that the rapid movement of the white blood cells is more like that of millipedes.  Rather than sticking front and back, folding and extending to push itself forward, the cell creates numerous tiny ‘legs’ no more than a micron in length – adhesion points, rich in adhesion molecules (named LFA-1) that bind to partner adhesion molecules present on the surface of the blood vessels.  Tens of these legs attach and detach in sequence within seconds – allowing them to move rapidly while keeping a good grip on the vessels’ sides.The press release went on to say that these legs don’t just walk.  They act as probes as they press into the epithelial tissue lining the vessels.  The force of blood actually forces them to embed their little legs into the tissue as a way to sense the location of the damaged tissue and make their way to it.  “The scientists believe that the tiny legs are trifunctional:,” the article said: “Used for gripping, moving and sensing distress signals from the damaged tissue.”A reader found an animation of this at Harvard BioVisions.  Click on the media file labeled “Extravasation” and it will show you some of the parts and processes involved.    It’s uncanny how the actions of these cells lacking a brain, muscles or central nervous system can act so precisely and effectively, they can be compared to multicellular organisms with all those systems.  You can almost visualize these cells like ambulance crew members or soldiers in specially designed vehicles able to cling to attachment points against the flow of traffic.  They seem so well trained and effective, it looks like they do what they do on purpose.  What a concept.(Visited 42 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Original Proteins Found in Fossil Sea Turtle

first_img(Visited 1,019 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The fossil of a sea turtle said to be 54 million years old still has original proteins of pigment and muscle.A press release from North Carolina State University drops another bomb on deep time. Even though the researchers, including co-author Mary Schweitzer, do not doubt the age of the fossil at 54 million Darwin Years, that is an awful lot of time for original biomolecules to be preserved.Researchers from North Carolina State University, Lund University in Sweden and the University of Hyogo in Japan have retrieved original pigment, beta-keratin and muscle proteins from a 54 million-year-old sea turtle hatchling. The work adds to the growing body of evidence supporting persistence of original molecules over millions of years and also provides direct evidence that a pigment-based survival trait common to modern sea turtles evolved at least 54 million years ago.That last clause compounds the problem by pushing back a trait earlier than expected. In this case, it is dark coloration, believed to provide camouflage from predators and heat regulation by absorbing sunlight as the hatchling scurried across the sand to the seashore. No evolution is documented, because the adaptive trait was already present!Fossil (left) and modern sea turtle hatchlings. Credit: Johan Lindgren, reproduced from NC State press release (click for link).The fossil was found in Denmark in 2008, but soft tissue remains were not recovered till 2013. Johan Lindgren of Lund University performed multiple tests to analyze the remains. He found organelles he suspected were melanosomes, the structures that provide coloration. He brought in other researchers for further analysis.Lindgren performed ToF-SIMS on the samples to confirm the presence of heme, eumelanin and proteinaceous molecules – the components of blood, pigment and protein.Co-author Mary Schweitzer, professor of biological sciences at NC State with a joint appointment at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, performed histochemical analyses of the sample, finding that it tested positive against antibodies for both alpha and beta-keratin, hemoglobin and tropomyosin, a muscle protein. TEM, performed by University of Hyogo evolutionary biologist Takeo Kuriyama, and Schweitzer’s immunogold testing further confirmed the findings.Schweitzer, in an apparent pre-emptive strike at skeptics, stated that confirmation of these particular proteins rules out contamination, because bacteria don’t make eukaryotic melanin or keratin.The open-access paper was published October 17 in Nature Scientific Reports, DOI:  10.1038/s41598-017-13187-5. It calls the specimen “arguably one of the best preserved juvenile fossil sea turtles on record.” Traces of soft tissue were preserved “with great fidelity“, the paper says. What was found was original, unmineralized material.Here we show that the extraordinary preservation of the type of T. danica goes beyond gross morphology to include ultrastructural details and labile molecular components of the once-living animal. Haemoglobin-derived compounds, eumelanic pigments and proteinaceous materials retaining the immunological characteristics of sauropsid-specific β-keratin and tropomyosin were detected in tissues containing remnant melanosomes and decayed keratin plates. The preserved organics represent condensed remains of the cornified epidermis and, likely also, deeper anatomical features, and provide direct chemical evidence that adaptive melanism – a biological means used by extant sea turtle hatchlings to elevate metabolic and growth rates – had evolved 54 million years ago.“…arguably one of the best preserved juvenile fossil sea turtles on record.”The evolutionary speculation and dates are not derived from the observations. It’s important to recall that until recently, no one expected original proteins to survive a hundred thousand years, let alone millions. So how do the researchers explain this “extraordinary preservation” of material in this fossil labeled MHM-K2, that should be long gone?We hypothesise that calcium ions (and other trace elements) adsorbed onto the surface of the carcass during the microbially mediated formation of the calcareous concretion in which MHM-K2 was found. Mild geothermal conditions might then have limited further breakdown of the stabilised organics.Haemoglobin also imparts tissue fixation by iron-catalysed free radical reactions and/or inhibition of bacterial growth (ref.44 and references therein), possibly contributing to preservation of anatomical features deeper than the cornified epidermis. Blood breakdown products released from erythrocytes during hemolysis can seep into surrounding tissues, causing a reddish-brown discolouration. Impregnation by haemoglobin-derived compounds has been recorded not only in bones, but also in scales and teeth. Consequently, it is possible that the outer integument was infiltrated by blood residues diffusing from underlying (and now almost completely degraded) dermal or deeper tissues sometime during the early stages of decomposition of MHM-K2. Detection of haemoglobin- and tropomyosin-derived compounds supports this possibility.The language is cautious, because they can only suggest “possibilities” that “might” explain the preservation. Proteins, however, are delicate molecules subject to thermal breakdown. Stabilizing processes, even if plausible, cannot last indefinitely. But for tens of millions of years? Mark Armitage, who has recovered and analyzed dinosaur soft tissue himself, strongly disputes the ability of blood-derived iron to stabilize soft tissues.Much of the paper sidesteps this important question by speculating about when “adaptive melanism” evolved. But really, does the fossil look any “less evolved” than the living turtle? Why do they give it a different scientific name when it is virtually identical? Did the hatchling really fossilize that long ago?Since dinosaur soft tissues and proteins have been found twice as old as those in this sea turtle (1/29/17), long-age evolutionists are panicking. They are scrambling to downplay the findings (6/09/15, 9/19/17) or pretending soft tissue is exciting because it can shed light on evolution. These are distractions from the danger their worldview is in.The Darwin hot-air balloon can only hold a finite number of fossils with soft tissue before it comes crashing to the ground. Keep piling them up in the gondola. And turn on those video cams, everyone! Let the public see the collapse.last_img read more

Zuma to discuss fees impasse with university students and management

first_img“Nobody disagrees with the message that students from poor households are facing financial difficulties and possible exclusion,” said South African President Jacob Zuma. (Image: The Presidency)South African President Jacob Zuma is set to meet university management and student leaders on Friday 23 October to discuss the countrywide stalemate over fee increases.The meeting will be held with university vice-chancellors, chairpersons of councils and student leaders at the Union Buildings in Pretoria, with a view to finding a solution to the impasse.This will be Zuma’s second meeting with university management this month. His consultation with vice-chancellors and council chairs on 6 October resolved to set up a task team to explore solutions to short-term student funding challenges.Zuma said the government fully understands the pressure and difficulties confronting students from poor and working class households.“It is important that we work together to find solutions,” he said. “Nobody disagrees with the message that students from poor households are facing financial difficulties and possible exclusion.“Even in the January 8 statement of the governing party this year, we stated that the escalating cost of university education had become another source of exclusion for the poor and vulnerable South African child. All parties should allow space for this matter to be discussed in a manner that will enable us to find a solution.”In a statement released today, the South African government reiterated its commitment to funding for both basic and higher education, and to overcoming funding shortfalls.“Since 1994 government has prioritised education,” the statement reads. “This has translated into substantial funding for both basic and higher education. But given the legacy of the past there is a funding shortfall in higher education.“The current student protests over higher fees which began at Wits University and have since migrated to other campuses are of serious concern to government. The issues raised by the students are legitimate and government is sympathetic to their cause and are in line with our own priorities of ensuring quality and affordable education.“Government is committed to working with student leadership, university management and unions to find a solution to the current impasse and is working towards a long term solution to student funding in South Africa.”last_img read more

Understanding Home Energy Performance Will Become a Key to Real Estate Success

first_imgBy DOUGLAS MILLERReal estate professionals play a pivotal role in the U.S. residential real estate market. Overseeing from start to finish the multiple steps and piles of paperwork involved with property transactions, they support both sellers moving forward with the next stage of their lives and buyers looking for a new place to call home. They provide trusted and influential guidance that affects the largest investment that most of us will ever make: our homes.Home energy performance is too often overlooked by buyers and sellers during property transactions, and buyers seldom have easy access to energy performance information. Even though U.S. homeowners spend on average about $2,200 per year on energy bills and increasingly indicate demand for energy-efficient homes, real estate professionals generally undersell (or are unaware of) the benefits of homes with strong energy performance.These benefits include improved comfort, health, privacy, programmability, and interconnectivity, as well as increased monthly affordability and — where relevant information is made available — resale value. Moreover, U.S. real estate listings generally lack details about a property’s energy performance, energy-efficient features, and estimated utility costs. This omission contributes to the unnecessary perpetuation of the invisibility of home energy upgrade investments, housing dissatisfaction, underinvestment in home energy upgrades, plateauing residential energy savings, and risks to U.S. real estate market stability. Changing consumer demandsReal estate professionals are under pressure to accommodate various evolving market trends. Consumer preferences are diverging based on generation, with baby boomers looking to age in place and millennials becoming the largest share of home buyers with their own demands. Numerous residential energy technologies — including rooftop solar, LED lighting, programmable thermostats and appliances, heat pumps, and battery storage — are becoming commonplace and sought-after in homes.State and local governments are also increasing standards for energy performance for new and existing homes. For example, California has a statewide goal for all new residential construction to achieve zero net energy status by 2020.Real estate professionals can embrace and profit from these market trends by making home energy performance a core component of the support they provide for buyers and sellers. Those who help clients identify where to start, which home energy upgrades can deliver the most value, and how to showcase these upgrades during property sales will be better situated to meet emerging consumer demands and ride the wave of market trends for profit. As such, real estate professionals who ignore insights about where the market is heading and fail to build their own energy performance capabilities should expect to fall behind. Giving Green Certification a Home in Real Estate Listings Q&A: I’m A New Real Estate Agent and I Would Like to Sell Energy-Efficient, Clean, Safe HomesGreen Home Appraisal WoesSeeing Red on a Green Property Appraisal — Part 1Seeing Red on a Green Property Appraisal — Part 2Seeing Red on a Green Property Appraisal — Part 3One Broker’s Take on the Selling Power of Green Opportunity is calling for all real estate professionals to tap the promising U.S home energy upgrades market by helping clients understand, prioritize, and invest in home energy performance during the property transaction process — when buyers and sellers already tend to make general home improvements. Real estate professionals who enhance their home energy performance capabilities can lead their competitors on market trends and improve the long-term prospects of their business. Gaining a green credentials advantageReal estate professionals with green credentials — namely, the National Association of Realtors Green Designation—maintain a higher standard of support for buyers and sellers. They understand why energy performance matters. They also know how to implement green data entry fields on multiple listing service (MLS) systems, promote the benefits of energy-efficient features, get enhanced property valuations from appraisers with sustainability credentials, and use energy performance to differentiate among properties.Until home energy performance capabilities become a general industry standard for real estate professionals, green credentials like the Realtors Green Designation offer a useful indicator for buyers and sellers seeking higher quality support and better outcomes during real estate transactions. Buyers and sellers who want homes delivering greater comfort, health, resale value, and affordability for their families should therefore seek out real estate professionals with such credentials.As more buyers and sellers seek the benefits that high-performance homes deliver and expect assistance finding them during the property transaction process, real estate professionals who embrace market trends and take the initiative today to make home energy performance central to their client support will be in an advantageous position to harness the markets of tomorrow.center_img Using home energy performance to get aheadIn the rapidly evolving U.S. residential market, real estate professionals can leverage home energy performance to achieve faster closing times and higher closing rates, larger commissions, and greater competitive advantage.To encourage and empower U.S. real estate professionals to understand and promote the multiple benefits of homes with strong energy performance, Rocky Mountain Institute’s Residential Energy+ team developed the “Home Heroes” infographic in partnership with the National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF) — a congressionally chartered organization with a vision to have 300 million Americans actively use environmental knowledge by 2022 (see Image #2, below).This shareable education tool describes how real estate professionals can support home buyers and sellers in the pursuit of homes that are better for their families, their pocketbooks, and the environment in order to gain competitive advantage in a real estate market that’s evolving to meet changing customer demands. More specifically, the tool links to leading research about the ways that real estate professionals can gain from making energy performance central to the support they provide buyers and sellers, along with specific actions they can take to better support their clients. RELATED ARTICLES © 2017 Rocky Mountain Institute. Published with permission. Originally posted on RMI Outlet.last_img read more

Colorado’s Low-Income Solar Model

first_imgMissing the solar revolutionThe NREL report, authored by Jeffrey Cook and Monisha Shah, points out that low-income households spend proportionately more of their money on energy than others. One study of 48 U.S. cities showed the median energy burden for low-income households was 7.2%, more than double the burden for the median household across all cities. In some cases it was much higher.One way of reducing energy costs is by installing on-site PV systems, but the NREL report says this boom has largely been reserved for middle- and upper-income families. In California, for example, only about 5% of all residential PV installations were on homes with annual incomes of less than $40,000.“If this trend holds true in many other states, PV may disproportionately benefit higher-income families nationally,” the authors said.Colorado addressed the problem with a 2010 law called the Community Solar Garden Act, which required developers of community solar projects to make sure that at least 5% of their subscribers were low-income households. Since then, the Colorado Energy Office has expanded efforts by supporting community solar projects that were completely earmarked for low-income households and by incorporating PV into state weatherization programs.Until 2005, photovoltaics were not eligible for funding under the federal Weatherization Assistance Program. Through the Energy Policy Act approved that year, weatherization funds could be used for up to $3,000 worth of solar on an individual residence, providing the state could show the Department of Energy that adding solar to its program would be cost-effective. (The limit has since been raised.) The state has also tapped into federal money distributed under the federal Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program to pay for weatherization programs.Xcel Energy, the state’s largest investor-owned utility, helps subsidize the cost of PV installations using money it collects under a renewable energy portfolio fee, the NREL report says. From 2017 to 2019, the number of households getting PV is limited to 300, with the capacity of each system capped at 3.5 kW.Roughly 11% of Colorado residents are what the NREL report calls “energy impoverished,” meaning they spend more than 10% of their annual household income on energy. Energy-efficiency improvements typically include the replacement of refrigerators and light bulbs, and adding insulation in the attic, around ducts, and in walls. In addition to savings from those improvements, households that also got PV installations could see annual energy savings of $400 or more, the NREL report said.Joseph Pereira, director of low-income services for the Colorado Energy Office, told Inside Climate News that making solar available to more low-income people also helps address a basic fairness question. Low-income electricity customers pay the same renewable energy fee to their utility as any other customer, he said, but they get a disproportionately smaller share of direct benefits.“From an equity standpoint, it was really time to get some of that money moving in the low-income direction,” he said. In all, eight community solar projects have been developed that help some 400 low-income subscribers reduce their electricity bills by between 15% and 50%.Colorado is one of a dozen states and the District of Columbia that have PV programs for low-income households. Colorado’s program is not the largest, but it is viewed as a model because officials developed a step-by-step process that could be adapted successfully by other states.“Ultimately, the Colorado Energy Office strategy is only one example of how states can develop a comprehensive approach to support PV deployment among low-income residents,” a recent report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) said. “Nevertheless, [Colorado’s] efforts offer a clear roadmap for other states …” Solving Energy PovertyEfficiency Advocates to Study Energy AuditsEnergy Efficiency Costs Less Than New Generation Weatherization Assistance Program: Getting the Facts StraightIs Weatherization Cost-Effective?Low-Income Housing: Problems and Solutions Colorado is expanding its energy assistance efforts to make solar electricity available to more low-income households. The state is using a systematic approach that experts say could be a “clear roadmap” for other states.A report posted at Inside Climate News says that photovoltaic (PV) arrays rated at 20 megawatts, all earmarked for low-income residents, should be installed by the end of next year. That includes rooftop solar systems at some homes as well as a number of community solar facilities that collectively serve hundreds of households.Rooftop PV arrays have been installed by county and regional weatherization offices that already were adding insulation and making other energy-efficiency improvements for low-income residents. One county weatherization official called the expansion into solar “the next logical step” in helping low-income people lower their energy bills.In addition to installing rooftop solar on individual homes, Colorado’s Energy Office also is backing a number of community solar projects. They include the 2-megawatt Coyote Ridge Solar Farm in Fort Collins, which is thought to be the largest low-income community solar facility in the U.S. It was installed by the nonprofit Grid Alternatives in conjunction with the local utility, Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association.center_img RELATED ARTICLES Getting the cost of PV downIn a telephone call, Pereira said that PV installations help solve an inherent weakness in conventional weatherization programs. Data gathered by his office show that low-income residents spend about 50% of their energy budgets on home heating and the other 50% on electricity unrelated to heating.“We have a long-standing weatherization program that does a great job and saves customers a lot of money, but it really doesn’t save on the electric side of that ledger,” he said. “We didn’t embark on solar for solar’s sake. The data really led us to the idea that we could use solar, be it rooftop or community solar, to achieve our goals, which was to put low-income customers’ expenditures in parity with the rest of the state.”The goal is not to “give away free electricity,” he added, but to make sure these customers have about the same energy burden as customers who have more money. That means a reduction in power bills of 30% to 50%.When the program began, the state was paying installers about $3.60 per watt for the installations. But since then, they’ve knocked about $1 off the cost, due largely to steep reductions in the soft costs that installers typically would have to cover. Pereira said the program’s internal target is $2 a watt.In deciding which homes get solar and which don’t, program officials are bound by federal guidelines that require at least a 1-to-1 payback. That is, for every $1 spent on solar the benefit to the customer must be at least $1.“We’re not putting solar on any homes where it’s not cost effective to do so,” he said. “That is, the customer receives benefits greater than the investment we make. We’re seeing positive numbers. We’re seeing a 1.8 to 2.4 return on investment.”The expansion of conventional weatherization improvements to include solar is just an acknowledgement that the utility landscape is more dynamic now than it has been in the past, Pereira said. “This isn’t any magic thing,” he said. “It’s just more responsive to the world we’re in now.”last_img read more

The Year in Review: Wintertime Reflections and What We Can Learn from Aesop

first_imgWritten by: Christopher Plein, Ph.D. West Virginia University and MFLN Caregiving Team MemberIt is the winter solstice, or nearly so.  While the days will soon be getting longer, the colder months are upon us and the year is coming to a close.  It’s a time for reflection. Recently, I have been mulling over Aesop’s fable of the “The Ants and the Grasshopper.” Most of you will know the story and how the grasshopper fiddled away the summer with music and dance, as the ants industriously prepared for the winter ahead by harvesting and storing grain. I offer the fable to my students to remind them of the importance of studying and preparing early for the projects and tests that will come at the end of the term.   With the weather closing in and semester’s end, it is little wonder that I am thinking about this fable.As I have been going over my past blogs for 2017, a couple of constant themes stand out – one deals with knowledge and the other with change.  Knowledge comes about through self-awareness and self-reliance.  We live in an information-rich age, but we do not always avail ourselves to reliable knowledge that is literally at our fingertips or to the wisdom of those around us.  Change is a constant — but unpredictable.  We need to anticipate and prepare for life’s vagaries – whether it’s a change in a policy or program that affects our job, or whether it’s a more jolting change that affects the wellbeing of a loved one who may need our care and support.  Like the ants in Aesop’s fable, it is important for us to gather a storehouse of reserves – in our case knowledge and awareness so that we can meet the uncertainties of the future with wisdom and confidence.The Military Caregiving Team and the Military Families Learning Network offers programming that is aimed at helping us acquire these resources.  We do this through webinars, virtual events, podcasts, and video series, but also through blogs.  To help gain knowledge of important policy developments regular updates and reviews are often the subject of a blog.  This past year, we did this even if it did involve a “Little Medicaid Summer Reading” .  We also tracked the rapid and uncertain developments in the politics of the Affordable Care Act . Taking a step back, we explored how the design of our government and the past shapes current policy development and outcomes  – Encountering Change Part 1 & Part 2. An appreciation of both policy and program detail and the context, helps us to assess the present and to anticipate what might be in store for the future.We also explored that when facing change, it is important that each of us be self-aware and self-reliant. But this does not mean going it alone.  Indeed, we may be not see the bigger picture or appreciate the views and needs of others if we do not work with others.  This is a concept we explored in a blog on fairness, inclusivity, and ethics entitled “Gaining Perspective to Understand Change”.  We also learned that we should be aware and cultivate our networks and links to many resources: whether it is to help us care for a loved one; to access the many resources that are available in communities; or connect to resources through the military family readiness and support system.We can learn a lot from the ants in Aesop’s fable, but life is not rewarding if we do not have a little bit of the grasshopper in each of us.  As we invest effort to build the storehouse of knowledge and self-awareness, also take time to celebrate and enjoy.  There’s no better time than now.  Season’s greetings and best wishes for the New Year.This MFLN-Military Caregiving concentration blog post was published on December 22, 2017.last_img read more

Wozniacki into second French Open quarterfinal

first_imgLacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ “Svetlana’s a great player, especially on clay so I knew it wouldn’t be easy,” said the 26-year-old after her eighth win in 14 meetings against the Russian.Sunday’s clash was their first on clay.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“I played a great first set but I still knew I had to stay cool and aggressive.” Denmark’s Caroline Wozniacki returns the ball to Russia’s Svetlana Kuznetsova during their tennis match at the Roland Garros 2017 French Open on June 4, 2017 in Paris. / AFP PHOTO / CHRISTOPHE SIMONCaroline Wozniacki reached the French Open quarterfinals for the first time in seven years on Sunday with a 6-1, 4-6, 6-2 win over 2009 champion Svetlana Kuznetsova.Danish 11th seed Wozniacki, who made her only other last-eight appearance in Paris in 2010, faces either Australia’s Samantha Stosur or Jelena Ostapenko of Latvia for a semifinal place.ADVERTISEMENT La Salle fights off gutsy UE for 4th win Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View comments Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR MOST READ Every 18 seconds someone is diagnosed with HIV Palace: Duterte to hear out security execs on alleged China control of NGCP BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games LATEST STORIES BSP survey: PH banks see bright horizon amid dark global recession clouds Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

Sports ministry to bring new law on doping in Monsoon Session

first_imgRattled by the doping scandal that has rocked Indian athletics, the Sports Ministry is planning to bring a new law to deal with the menace in the forthcoming Monsoon Session of Parliament.”We are going to the Cabinet in this regard and wish to bring a specific law on doping in the Monsoon Session of Parliament,” said Minister for Sports and Youth Affairs Ajay Maken, on the sidelines of a workshop on population held at Vigyan Bhawan in New Delhi on Monday.”We also want that the WADA norms be applicable to all sports. In case the norms or international sports bodies are different from those of WADA, or are in conflict, then the norms of international sports bodies would be applicable.”When asked about the Board of Control for Cricket in India, which does not adhere to WADA norms on doping, the minister said, “I am not talking about any one sport. This will be made applicable to all sports.””Mostly, the norms of various international sports bodies are in consonance with those of WADA. We expect that all such sports bodies adhere to WADA norms. But in case of a conflict, the norms of international bodies would apply.”On the action taken so far on doping within the country, the minister said, “Whatever it is, now we have asked NIS, SAI and NADA to be more vigilant. I have asked NADA to carry on more surprise checks, increase the frequency and change the dope officers and I am hopeful of positive results.”advertisement”We have already started conducting raids. Surprise checks were carried out on Saturday at NIS in Patiala and such raids are being conducted at Bangalore today. Such raids will be carried out more frequently and wherever dope material is found entering the premises, strict action will be taken.””Already, strict action has been taken against seven officials and Justice Mukul Mudgal has been appointed to carry out a thorough probe. Strict action would taken. We will spare no one.”- With PTI inputslast_img read more

New Perspective on Service Charge impact on Resorts Recommendations for Govt

first_img TCI Govt Year End Report: $67.8 Million surplus, MPs row over service charge Related Items:#magneticmedianews, #resortrecommendationstogovernment, #ServiceChargebill TCI: Landmark vote, House of Assembly members support workers getting full service charge Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp TCI: ‘Big mistake’ says Deputy Premier after Gansevoort staff ‘change’ letter leaked Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTurks and Caicos, March 30, 2017 – Providenciales – The national conversation being had about service charge has to be handled right or it could lead to a shut-down of expansions or closure of resort properties in the TCI.  Confusions over the reason for the tax to guests, the revenue itself and how it is dispersed and even the name of the tax are emerging everyday with more and more information coming and more and more people being engaged in the conversation.One thing appears clear though, both major political parties are determined to fulfill campaign promises to industry employees to see them receive 100% of this fee, currently they are getting 60% of the tax, and not 40% as we had previously reported.  Titles like gratuity, service charge, resort fee and facilities fee have all been linked to this money which is vital to the workers’ take home pay and vital, Magnetic Media is learning to the operation of the resorts.On Tuesday, the PDM Administration announced that a survey was launched to begin public engagement and last week, PNP Appointment Member, Royal Robinson seemed to pick up where his brother, Clarence Selver left off.  As the then PDM appointed Member, Selver also tried to champion that all of this money should go to hospitality workers.  Many resorts are exposing though that to lose the 40% or not to get at least that 40% would be catastrophic when it comes to the profitability of the properties; in some cases it would actually eliminate profits say some.One recommendation which Magnetic Media has been exposed to is that there needs to be clarity in the terminology.  The charge needs to be a guest paid tip or gratuity – newly created – which goes 100% to the hospitality worker and that there needs to be a name change of service charge to something more suitable like facilities or resort fee.  Once established, this facilities or resort fee could continue to be split, 60-40 as is the case currently.  It will mean guests voluntarily leave money in a newly created revenue stream and all of it goes to the staff;  and that the staffers continue to get their 60% share of a resort or facilities fee with the resorts holding onto the 40% to offset operational costs.Magnetic Media is told that this will have to be discussed with government as the major focus is obviously to appease the thousands of workers in the sector, who believe they have for years been shortchanged by not getting this collected money in full.#MagneticMediaNews#Servicechargebill#resortrecommendationstogovernment Recommended for youlast_img read more