Atlanta man arrested with six guns, body armor at Publix grocery store

first_imgBlakeDavidTaylor/iStockBy MARK OSBORNE, ABC News(ATLANTA) — Two days after 10 people were murdered at a grocery store in Colorado, a man was arrested at an Atlanta supermarket with a semiautomatic rifle, a shotgun and four handguns. The man also was wearing body armor and had a cache of ammunition, according to police.Atlanta police identified the suspect as Rico Marley, 22, and said he’d been charged with reckless conduct.The incident happened at about 1:30 p.m. Wednesday when a witness saw Marley allegedly enter the Publix grocery store’s bathroom with a cache of weaponry. The individual called police and the suspect was arrested when he left the bathroom, law enforcement said.No shots were fired and no one was injured in the incident.Authorities said Grady Memorial Hospital emergency services were conducting a mental health evaluation on Marley.“At Publix, the safety of our associates and customers is our priority,” the grocery store said in a statement about the incident. “We are cooperating with local law enforcement on an incident that occurred earlier today in our Atlantic Station store. We are thankful that there were no injuries, and all were able to exit the store safely. The store is currently closed. Additional questions should be directed to the Atlanta Police Department.”Charles Russell, who saw the man in the bathroom, told Atlanta ABC affiliate WSB-TV that he immediately notified workers at the store.“I saw an AR-15 and I was like … you know, this kind of startled me, again with the events that just recently happened in the grocery store up in Colorado,” Russell said. “I went to the clerk at the customer service desk working at the time and let them know. It wasn’t acted upon right away. It was actually taken a little more lightly than I thought it would be, especially with the recent events.”Not only were 10 people killed at a King Sooper grocery store in Boulder, Colorado, on Monday, but eight individuals were killed in the Atlanta area last week in shootings at three spas. Robert Aaron Long was arrested and charged with eight counts of murder in those shootings.Marley is being held at Fulton County Jail.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

For mental health, bad job worse than no job

first_imgWith unemployment still high, job seekers who have been discouraged by a lack of work might be inclined to take the first opportunity they’re offered. That will help pay the bills, but it could cause other problems: A new study suggests that some jobs are so demoralizing they’re actually worse for mental health than not working at all.The findings add a new wrinkle to the large body of research showing that being out of work is associated with a greater risk of mental health problems. In the study, which followed more than 7,000 Australians over a seven-year period, unemployed people generally reported feeling calmer, happier, less depressed, and less anxious after finding work, but only if their new jobs were rewarding and manageable.“Moving from unemployment to a poor-quality job offered no mental health benefit, and in fact was more detrimental to mental health than remaining unemployed,” says the lead author of the study, Peter Butterworth, Ph.D., a senior research fellow at the Centre for Mental Health Research at the Australian National University, in Canberra. The study was published in the journal Occupational and Environmental Medicine.Butterworth and his colleagues analyzed data from an annual survey in which participants described their mental state, their employment status, and — or those with a job — details of the working conditions that they enjoyed (or didn’t enjoy, as the case may be). The survey respondents were asked how strongly they agreed with statements such as “My job is complex and difficult” and “I worry about the future of my job.”The researchers focused on four job characteristics that are closely linked with mental health: the complexity and demands of the work, job security, compensation, and job control (i.e., the freedom to decide how best to do the job, rather than being ordered around).Unemployed people who found a job that rated well in these areas reported a substantial improvement in their mental health. By contrast, newly employed people who felt overwhelmed, insecure about their employment, underpaid, and micromanaged reported a sharp decline in their mental health, including increased symptoms of depression and anxiety. Even those who couldn’t find a job fared better. This last finding was “striking,” Butterworth says. “This runs counter to a common belief that any job offers psychological benefits for individuals over the demoralizing effects of unemployment.”Although certain types of jobs — such as working in a customer-service call center — are more likely to be downers, the working environment tends to have a greater impact on mental health than the job description itself, Butterworth adds. Managers are especially important to employee well-being, says Robert Hogan, Ph.D., an expert on personality in the workplace and a former chair of the department of psychology at the University of Tulsa. “Bad bosses will make anybody unhappy,” Hogan says. “Stress comes from bad managers.”Policy-makers should address the impact that the workplace has on mental — and not just physical — health, Butterworth says. “In the same way that we no longer accept workplaces that are physically unsafe or in which employees are exposed to dangerous or toxic substances, there could be a greater focus on ensuring a more positive psychosocial environment at work.”By Matt McMillen, CNN Health Tweet HealthLifestyle For mental health, bad job worse than no job by: – March 15, 2011 Sharing is caring! 58 Views   no discussionscenter_img Share Share Sharelast_img read more