Pictures reveal damage caused by wipes being flushed down Limerick’s loos

first_imgLimerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Advertisement Email WhatsApp Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener IRISH Water is reminding Limerick people to think about what they flush down the loo after pictures revealed severe blockages caused by wet wipes in treatment plants across the county.Unlike toilet paper, wipes do not break down when flushed down the toilet. Instead they can clump together to form blockages in sewer pipes and in wastewater treatment systems. This can cause sewer overflows in our towns and villages and pollution in our waterways and beaches.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up In recent weeks blockages cause by wipes and other materials have been cleared from treatment systems in Abbeyfeale, Newcastle West, Askeaton, Rathkeale, Croagh and Dromcollogher.However this is a problem that is experienced right across the city and county, with hundreds of such blockages having to be cleared every week from Ireland’s wastewater network.Anna Brosnan, Irish Water’s Wastewater Operations Lead for Limerick explains, “We know that people are using more wipes than ever to keep hands and surfaces clean and prevent the spread of Covid 19.“While it is important we all follow the HSE guidelines on handwashing and coughing etiquette we are reminding people to dispose of wipes correctly.“By making sure wipes are put in the bin and not in the toilet, everyone can do their bit to prevent sewer blockages and help keep our waters safe, clean and healthy.“It is really important that the public help us to manage the network at this time by simply binning all wipes, gloves and masks and to only ever flush the 3 Ps (pee, poo and paper).” she explained.The Think Before You Flush campaign is operated by Clean Coasts in partnership with Irish Water. Our message is simple, only the 3 Ps – pee, poo and paper – should be flushed down the toilet.All other waste, such as wipes and kitchen roll, should go in the bin to avoid it becoming marine litter, or blockages in our home and wastewater network.To find out more about the Think Before You Flush campaign please visit the campaign website http://thinkbeforeyouflush.org/ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LimerickNewsPictures reveal damage caused by wipes being flushed down Limerick’s loosBy Meghann Scully – July 7, 2020 836 Facebook Previous articleLimerick Post Show | Cat ReynoldsNext articleLimerick City and County Council to waive fees to businesses for on-street furniture as part of Covid-19 support initiatives Meghann Scully center_img Print Twitter Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Linkedin TAGSIrish WaterKeeping Limerick PostedlimerickLimerick Postwater last_img read more

Mayweather beats Japan’s Nasukawa by technical knockout

first_imgWith the Japanese fighter clearly struggling to stay on his feet, the trainer rushed in and stopped the fight with just one minute of the first round remaining.The 41-year-old Mayweather carried a more than 4kg (9lb) weight advantage into the ring.The rules were very strictly defined: three, three minute bouts and boxing only — kickboxer Nasukawa was reportedly facing a $5 million fine if he aimed a kick at Mayweather.There were no judges, with only a knockout or technical knockout considered a victory in the bout, promoted as a pure exhibition match.Crucially, the match did not feature on the record of either man, allowing them both to retain a cherished unbeaten record.Share on: WhatsApp Tokyo, Japan | AFP | Floyd Mayweather beat Japanese kickboxing phenomenon Tenshin Nasukawa by a technical knockout on Monday in the first round of a New Year’s Eve “exhibition” bout that brought the US boxing superstar out of retirement.Mayweather floored Nasukawa, a kickboxer less than half his age, three times in the first round of the three-round contest before the Japanese fighter’s trainer rushed in to stop the fight.The American boxer at first appeared not to be taking the fight seriously, grinning at his opponent and aiming only soft punches at him.But he then demonstrated his power, launching a series of jabs and hooks to the head of the 20-year-old Japanese fighter, sending him to the canvas after just one minute.Sensing his opponent was struggling, Mayweather stepped in for the kill, unleashing a flurry of punches that left Nasukawa reeling again within just two minutes of the bout and facing his second standing count.last_img read more

Why is NBA’s Violet Palmer a game changer?

first_imgViolet Palmer (Courtesy Photo)Sometimes longevity under difficult circumstances deserves praise. Violet Palmer became one of two women to infiltrate the all-male referee ranks of the NBA in 1997. Her fellow groundbreaking female referee left after five years, leaving Palmer to hold it down on her own for the last several years.“I didn’t just kick the door — I knocked it down,” Palmer told espnW.The climb upward hasn’t been easy.Palmer spent nine years refereeing high school and women’s college games, including two NCAA Final Fours and the championships. The NBA took notice and recruited Palmer.“The NBA was never my goal, because I thought it was unattainable. I was a college referee. I was the No. 3 referee in the world for women’s basketball.“I had everything. The Final Four. Big TV games – all the limelight I wanted. But my personality is if you give me a challenge, I’m going to take it.“In the back of my mind, I said, ‘It doesn’t cost me anything. I can just try it. If nothing happens, the training will be good.’”But things were difficult at first.“Generally it was a good ‘ole boys club, and I think that’s within any sport. There were a lot of referees that resented me joining the ranks,” Palmer told PBS.But looking back at her life, it wasn’t hard to predict that Palmer would be a trailblazer. If she wasn’t challenging her brother in basketball, she was busy being the only girl on her Little League team.At first, players didn’t know how to deal with her, said Palmer, and the fans and the critics were worse.“‘You’re not going to make it.’ ‘Why are you here? Go back to the WNBA.’ ‘Players and coaches are not going to accept you.’ ‘Your guys that you work with, they’re not going to accept you,’” Palmer said about her critics.And the rookies sometimes didn’t know how to act, Palmer told CNN.“Every now and then, I might have a little young fella come out, and I say, ‘Oh wait, young fella, I’ve got a lot more years of service than you. Check yourself,’” said Palmer.But then the players began to see that she was just like any of the other referees. Some of the players first looked at her as a mother figure and then just began to realize she was a cool person.“I think a woman should be able to do any job that she qualifies for,” Palmer told Scholastic. “If she can go out and be the best at it like any man, why shouldn’t she have the opportunity to do whatever sport or career (she wants)?”Now Palmer’s boldness has left that door she kicked open ajar for other women.“Two more women have already been working two or three NBA games a month this season for on-the-job training,” Palmer said. “And I’m not sure anyone even noticed much, which is great.”http://www.indianapolisrecorder.com/news/print_highlights/article_bb0045d2-9fc0-11e3-9c45-001a4bcf887a.htmllast_img read more