Man handed over to Donegal Gardai to face child sex charges

first_imgA man wanted in connection with child sexual offences in Inishowen was handed over to Gardaí at the border last Thursday after losing his battle against a European Arrest Warrant.The man, who cannot be named due to reporting restrictions applied by the court, was brought to Buncrana District Court after the PSNI brought him to Bridgend. Detective Garda Siobhan Tighe told the court that she charged the man with three counts of sexual assault against a child, alleged to have occurred in North Inishowen in 1991.After the first charge, Det. Gda.Tighe said the man, who is aged 60, replied ‘no, not yet’ and after the second and third charges, he replied ‘no’.She told the court that the man had been wanted in relation to the alleged charges since 2015, but had been challenging a European Arrest Warrant before the High Court and the Supreme Court in the North since 2017.However the court heard that the man’s attempts to fight against the arrest warrant had failed after the Supreme Court refused his application. He was subsequently brought to court in Northern Ireland where bail was revoked and the PSNI transported him to Bridgend where he was handed over to Gardaí.Garda Inspector Siobhan Mollohan said the Director of Public Prosecutions had directed trial on indictment before the Circuit Court but they were awaiting the Book of Evidence to be produced.Det. Gda.Tighe said she was objecting to bail on three points – the seriousness of the charges, the nature and strength of the evidence against him and his likelihood to abscond given the fact that he ‘evaded’ the EU arrest warrant for a number of years.“This man has not co-operated with Gardaí at all,” said Det. Gda.Tighe.“I had to put in a request via Interpol in 2015. In 2016 I was informed by Interpol that the man was aware of the charges against him after being informed by the PSNI. The European Arrest Warrant was executed in November 2017 and he has fought it since.“This man was informed to contact me at Buncrana Garda Station but at no point did he do this and today is the first day I have met him.”Defence barrister Gareth McGrory BL from Madden and Finucane Solicitors said his client had been on bail in Northern Ireland since the EU arrest warrant was executed and there had been no issue with his client complying with strict bail conditions, which included signing one three days a week, since then.“These are also just allegations and my client denies the allegations and will continue to maintain that throughout the trial,” Mr. McGrory BL stated.“It could be a considerable about of time before this case comes before the Circuit Court – he is anxious to have the matter resolved.“He is not a flight risk, he is married with children and settled in Northern Ireland and is happy to surrender his passport and sign on in this jurisdiction. We are also in a position to offer a cash surety from his daughter to the amount of €5,000,” the defence barrister added.He also stressed the importance of a publication order to restrict any press reporting that could reveal the man’s identity. He said the man had fought for an injunction to have his name kept out of the media in Northern Ireland but was automatically entitled to the right to anonymity at this stage in Donegal.Judge Paul Kelly said he would grant bail under certain circumstances, including the €5,000 independent surety. He must also sign on weekly at Buncrana Garda Station and have no contact with any witnesses involved the case whatsoever.The 60-year-old must surrender his passport and be contactable by mobile phone 24 hours a day. He remanded the case back to Buncrana in February for production of the book of evidence.Judge Kelly also granted the man legal aid, in the name Michael Halleron of Madden and Finucane Solicitors, and applied a publication order in order to protect the identity of the alleged victim involved.Man handed over to Donegal Gardai to face child sex charges was last modified: December 20th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:chargescourtdonegalGardaisex abuselast_img read more

Driving a new vision for Africa

first_imgThe 2011 Brand Africa Forum, sponsored by Brand South Africa and Brand Leadership Academy, saw an impressive range of pan-African, diasporan and global thought leaders, influencers and decision-makers coming together to debate how Africa can drive its growth, reputation and competitiveness.Youngsters from organisations likeBrightest Young Minds, One YoungWorld and the African LeadershipAcademy took part in a paneldiscussion on their vision for Africa.(Image: Ray Maota)The event was held on 29 September at the Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg and attracted more than 300 government, business and civil society representatives.Special focus areas included the role of the nation brand in economic development, governance and sustainability on the continent, economic lessons for Africa and the role of business in driving progress.The significance of South Africa joining Brazil, Russia, India and China in the BRICS bloc was explored, along with lessons to be learnt from emerging markets.The forum shone the spotlight on youth and their vision for the continent by including a panel of young leaders from Kenya, South Africa, Uganda and Senegal.The inaugural Brand 100 Awards for Africa also took place at the forum.In the opening address, Brand South Africa chairperson Anitha Soni challenged African nations to cooperate in developing strong country brands to improve the continent’s global competitiveness, adding that this would require better cooperation and information-sharing among countries on the continent.“For us, Brand South Africa’s involvement in the Brand Africa Forum is a natural fit because the health of Africa’s brand is important for the strength and health of our own nation brand,” said Brand SA CEO Miller Matola.“If countries on the continent improve in terms of their image and reputation, the same holds for South Africa. Our prosperity is inextricably linked to that of the other countries on the continent,” he said.Nation branding: we must walk the talk“National branding is not about slogans, it is about what you do and what they think, that matters. If one does not change the negative perceptions they will become realities. In Africa we are good at talking and planning, but weak in implementing. We must walk the talk,” said Zimbabwe’s Deputy Prime Minister Dr Arthur Mutambara.“A brand must transcend political affiliations and should not be the sole property of a set political party … It must be taken it personally because we will never be respected as Africans unless Africa has done well as a continent. This goes the same for individual countries,” he added.Telling it like it isGlobal economist Dr Dambisa Moyo spoke frankly about the current economic crisis, the sovereign debt crisis extending beyond Europe, and Africa’s place in the global picture.“We could be in for a 10-year bear market and recessionary environment. Where does Africa fit into this?” she asked. “We’re facing a very serious problem … there are simply not enough resources to go around.”Moyo said in the coming years the world will increasingly struggle due to a shortage of arable land, energy constraints and a lack of food security, compounded by a lack of water.“This is particularly in the context of the famine that’s going on in the Horn of Africa,” she added.“There are about 1-billion people in the world who go hungry every day – and the majority of them are on this continent. And yet, Africa has the largest amount of untilled land left on the planet.”As an economist, Moyo sees this in terms of supply and demand: “We’ve got hungry people, and we’ve got land.”When there’s a food crisis in Africa, the first response of NGOs is often to “provide a so-called band aid solution, sending bags of maize to Somalia or Ethiopia immediately”.Moyo said she doesn’t find this objectionable, but as an economist, she believes it presents a structural problem.“We’ve got to get to the root cause: why is it that Africa, in the last 30 years, has been the only continent that has failed to feed itself – especially in light of the fact that we have the most untilled land?”But there is some good news, she added: “In a future world of 9-billion people, in a world where we know there are going to be supply constraints in commodities and resources, Africa has an important role to play.“But before we can actually get to a point where we are producing food and coming up with innovative ways to develop, we need to deal with Brand Africa.”Moyo said Africans had to proactively discuss and respond to its important role in the future of the world.“Without us getting our heads around this, it’s all just wonderful conversation – but it’s not going to help us in the long term.”Addressing forum delegates, Moyo concluded: “I urge you in your discussions today – and when you return to your respective businesses – to really focus on where the world is going, and to also focus on Africa and its very important role in the future.“The winners in the decades to come will be the people who look to Africa as a place of business opportunity and a place for partnerships – not as a place that is a drag on the world economy.” What Africa should do to be a powerful continent?Malik Fal, MD of Endeavour spoke about the Africa 2.0: Kenya Report. Endeavour is a New-York based NGO dedicated to the promotion of entrepreneurship in emerging markets.The report is a manifesto of the envisioned economic and political transition Africa should take if it is to rightfully claim its spot as a powerful continent.Fal said: “The manifesto is the collective effort of young African’s views about what Africa should do to be a powerful continent.”Fal added that Africa was in danger of developing presidential monarchies, with leaders favouring their children to become future presidents. He said this was the same as a dictatorship.The report, which comes out in October 2011, will have four main themes: uplifting African’s; creating and sharing African wealth; upgrading Africa’s infrastructure and creating a stable environment for growth.Seeing Africa through the eyes of a youngstersCedric Ntumba, an executive at Capitalworks Investment Partners, led a panel of youngsters in discussing their vision of Africa in the future and how their goals could be achieved.The panel included Gertrude Kitongo of Kenya and Ralph Baumgarten of South Africa – both from Brightest Young Minds organisation; Zamatungwa Khumalo and Erik de Ridder – both of South Africa from the One Young World organisation; and Francis Ekii of Uganda and Linda Rebeiz of Senegal, from the African Leadership Academy.Ntumba asked the panel what should be done to inspire African youngsters.“Youngsters should be forward thinking and their thoughts should sketch a positive future,” Baumgarten said.De Ridder added that for the youngsters of Africa to be inspired, countries should have a human-centred approach to development and that young people should take ownership of the fact that they are the future.Ekii said: “Youngsters should be proactive and not reactive to their situations.”He cited an example of how, when he was just 13 years old, he and a few friends from his hometown in Uganda took it upon themselves to talk openly about HIV in the community.When Khumalo was asked how youngsters from other continents welcomed African youth, she said: “Youngsters from other parts of the world have a warped sense of Africa and African youngsters are more receptive to the outside world than their counterparts.”BRICS and the role of AfricaA panel discussion on South Africa’s role in the BRICS grouping of nations was chaired by Abdullah Verachia, Director of Frontier Advisory.The panel included Ajai Chowdry, chair of HCL in India; Dr Vijay Mahajan, author of Africa Rising; Dr MG Vaidyan, CEO of the State Bank of India in South Africa; James Mwangi, global managing partner at Dalberg and Christine Jiang, from Huawei Technologies.Chowdry said that for Africa was to protect itself from the effects of the looming economic crisis, Africa had to play an indirect role in helping Europe by keeping its domestic consumption growing.He said South Africa would play a direct role with its involvement in BRICS as the bloc would probably contribute money as a group to the International Monetary Fund.Dr Vaidyan said: “India understood early on like China that population size is not a burden but an asset, and an asset should be maintained.”Vaidyan said that although India had a large population; it had 18 000 colleges, 350 universities and 1-million schools to provide education to its citizens.“The country also recognised that for urban India to progress, rural India has to be developed, that is why at least 40% of the loans we give are to small-scale farmers. South Africa needs to follow that route if it is to be a major player in the BRICS grouping,” said Dr Vaidyan.Mahajan said Africa’s greatest challenge was its migrants overseas who talked negatively about their native countries, creating a warped view of the continent. Africa should make sure its “ambassadors” in foreign countries celebrated Africa, he added.Speaking about competition between companies in the BRICS grouping, Mahajan said: “Africa should not just roll out the red carpet for companies from the BRIC grouping to invest in the respective countries on the continent, but should advocate for African companies to also invest in those markets.”Brand Africa 100 awardsThe inaugural Brand Africa 100 awards also took place during forum, giving credit to the continent’s most valued brands as voted for by pan-African consumers.Research methodology for the awards was developed by the Brand Leadership Academy in partnership with TNS, a globally respected consumer knowledge and information company, and Brand Finance – the world’s leading independent valuation consultancy.“One of the primary drivers of Africa’s growth lies in stimulating and growing thriving African and global businesses and brands in Africa,” said Thebe Ikalafeng, founder and chairperson of Brand Africa.Ikalafeng added that consumers were the ultimate arbiters of a brand’s success and that the awards would show which brands are getting it right on the continent.The award sector categories included food, beverages, electronics, telecoms, automotive, apparel, banks, oil and gas, retail and personal care.Credit was also given to the most valued non-African brand, the most valued brand in Africa and the Grand Prix award for the most valued African brand overall.The winning brands were:Food – McDonaldsBeverages – Coca-ColaElectronics – SamsungTelecoms – MTNAutomotive – ToyotaApparel – NikeBanks – AbsaOil and gas – ShellRetail – Blue BandPersonal Care – NiveaThe most valued non-African brand went to Shell, while MTN was voted the most valued brand in Africa and took the Grand Prix award.last_img read more

Brand South Africa’s South African Competitiveness Forum and the Pan-African University Dialogue overview with Dr Kobby Mensah

first_imgBrand South Africa and the University of South Africa (UNISA) successfully partnered to host the South African Competitiveness Forum (SACF) and the Pan-African University Dialogue in a two-day programme on the 11th -12th September 2018 and wrapping up the South African visit with a day-tour in and around Johannesburg and Soweto on the 13th September 2018.The conference brought together academics, and industry representatives from South Africa, Ghana, Kenya, Uganda, and Nigeria to provide expert input on key issues that impact the competitiveness and reputation of the Pan-African brand. Additionally, to collaborate on finding a way forward in the Pan-African Marketing and Nation Brand research in the era of the Continental Free Trade Area.Further to this, it was important to determine inclusive solutions to the future of education in Pan-African brand marketing for students and educators across the continent.Dr Kobby Mensah from the University of Ghana Business School, a lecturer in the fields of tourism and marketing and one of the panellist at the dialogue, unpacks the two-day programme and his contribution to the dialogue.In a one-on-one conversation, Dr Mensah shared his key highlights on the dialogue, “There is a need for us to collaborate on a number of things, especially as academics, sharing of ideas in areas of study and collaborative research on the identity of Africa, Pan-Africa brand identity. To have a homogenous approach to building and maintaining Pan-African brand identity.”Dr Mensah’s presentation took on the topic of Pan-African identity and some of the ideas he reflected in the presentation was that “As Africa, we are suffering from the problem of autonomous sources of information – news, documentaries and textbooks which do not reflect the truth of who we are. We need to take charge, especially in technology to promote positivity about our countries and the Pan-African identity”As a lecturer he makes sure to challenge his students to advance in digital tourism were they share pictures of their communities, where they blog about their beautiful hidden gems, to influence the African narrative and change perception.When asked about the possibility of a future for a Pan-African brand. Yes, he said; “I definitely see the future and there must be clarity as to what it is we want in terms of a Pan-African Brand. How do we develop a brand that can be accessed within the African space and be able to push into the world?”Dr Mensah was amazed by the information shared by other colleagues and presentations it was “refreshing to see and hear”. This reaffirmed the imperative need for collaborative efforts and changing the principal learnings of what Nation brand is for a country and Pan-Africa.Rounding off the intensive yet informative dialogues, delegates were treated to a tour in and around Johannesburg and lunch served in the popular Lebo’s Backpackers.Dr Mensah encourages Africans to travel their continent and with Ghana, “travellers will be enthralled by the cultural diversity, and the colourfulness of the Ghanaian people and their kente garments”.last_img read more

New publication helps recognize pesticide drift

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A new Purdue Extension publication examines the causes and effects of pesticide drift.Pesticide drift occurs when chemicals used to manage weeds or insects are blown or carried off target by wind during application, posing a potential risk to people, animals and plants on neighboring properties.Pesticide drift can happen in both residential and agricultural settings and under all types of weather conditions, even if wind speeds are low, said Fred Whitford, director of the Purdue Pesticide Programs and one of the authors of Options for Dealing with a Pesticide Drift Incident.“Whether it’s a next-door neighbor or a farmer who owns the field adjacent to your property, they have the legal right to apply pesticides to their property,” Whitford said. “However, pesticide applicators also have the legal obligation to keep those products on their side of the property line.”According to the publication, some crop damage attributed to drift might be the result of other factors, such as insect infestations, plant diseases or weather conditions. The authors say it is important to find out what actually caused the damage before reporting a possible drift incident.“Purdue Extension educators can help you determine the cause of injury symptoms,” the publication says. “The educators will look for any possible explanations for the damage, including nutrient deficiencies, insect, weed and disease problems, improper planting and cultivation practices and environmental conditions.”Readers will also learn about the steps for reporting a possible drift incident and what actions could be taken if a drift incident is confirmed.Whitford’s co-authors are Michael O’Donnell, an Extension educator in Delaware County; Roy Ballard, an Extension educator in Hancock County; and Joe Becovitz, an agent with the Purdue-based Office of the Indiana State Chemist.The publication can be downloaded as a free PDF from Purdue’s The Education Storeat https://edustore.purdue.edu/item.asp?Item_Number=PPP-110#. Single printed copies are also available at no cost.last_img read more

Glenn Harsh, Oct. 29

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Harvest is progressing well. We are within a day of being done with soybeans. Unfortunately that is in about five or six little fields.We started on corn, but we have a ways to go. So far yields are very good. I had a couple of poorer fields that got planted later and they were right around 50 bushels. The rest of my fields have been in the 60s with some fields going 68 or 69 bushels so the yields were very good for the vast majority of the soybeans. We have only done a couple of corn fields. One was the north side of 200 and the other one we really pushed this year and it was over 250. I am interested to see what our more average fields are doing, but we haven’t made it that far yet.We got .9-inch of rain at the home farm over the weekend. I’m not sure other farms got quite that much. With being on tracks, we are going to a farm with a gravel entrance we can park the trucks on that we are going to try later this afternoon.The first field of beans I took off had some stink bug damage. We got out of that until some of the later fields where we found some more stink bug damage. These fields were scouted and they must have come in really late in the season. It was a little disheartening when you try to scout through the season and then you see something still come in and do damage to your crop. For us it was not a major issue, though. We may have had a couple of loads that could have had some issues if we were hauling them in, but we are not in too bad of shape. I have heard about some loads getting rejected and we haven’t had anything to that magnitude.We had to haul some landlord crop in last week and we were limited on which elevators we went to. They got us through fairly quickly. We did have to wait maybe an hour or an hour and a half on some loads. We have enough bins that we can hold almost everything and we don’t have to mess with it a whole lot.We are getting the cover crops seeded with a hi-boy in the corn. I can see each of the species growing out there in the six-way mix and that is looking good. Behind the soybeans we use a Turbo-Seeder behind soybeans and the first cover crop that we put in is coming up there also.last_img read more

2019 Sale of Champions results

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest It is another fantastic Sale of Champions at the 2019 Ohio State Fair. Watch it live here.Here are the results!The Grand Champion Swiss Cheese exhibited by Pearl Valley Cheese represents the seven dairy champions including Grand Champion Ayrshire: Marissa Topp, Auglaize County; Grand Champion Brown Swiss: Madelyn Topp, Auglaize County; Grand Champion Guernsey: Aubree Topp, Shelby County; Grand Champion Holstein: Kayla Cring, Huron County; Grand Champion Jersey: Blake Greiwe, Shelby County; Grand Champion Red and White: Wyatt Schlauch, Holmes County; Grand Champion Milking Shorthorn: Aubree Topp, Shelby County; Supreme Showman
Week 1 – Exhibited by: Ashley Hawvermale, Wayne County; and Week 2 – Exhibited by: Molly Moffet, Ashland County. The Grand Champion Swiss Cheese sold to AG Boogher and Sons, S&S Volvo, Ohio Dairy Association Mideast, COBA/Select Sires Hills Supply, Brewster Cheese, Biery Cheese, Great Lakes Cheese, Cox Concessions, Burkhart Farm Center, Velvet Ice Cream, Prengers, Pearl Valley Cheese, Dairy Farmers of America, and Scioto Cooperative Milk Producers for $28,000.The Grand Champion Market Turkey set a new record. It was shown by Johnathan Woodward of Coshocton County
 and sold to Cooper Farms, Farmer Boy Ag, Sarka Electric, Dangler Excavating, and Kale Marketing for $16,500.The Grand Champion Market Goat exhibited by Jada Shroyer of Logan County sold to Mark Kvamme for $17,000.The Grand Champion Meat Chickens exhibited by Ava Hester of Clinton County sold to Gerber Poultry and Kroger for $15,000.The Reserve Grand Champion Meat Chickens exhibited by Jozie Jones of Clinton County sold to Tim Huffman for $14,000.The Grand Champion Market Lamb exhibited by Paige Pence of Clark County sold to AG Boogher and Sons and S&S Volvo for $36,000.The Reserve Grand Champion Market Lamb exhibited by Grant Johnson of Wayne County sold to Meijer for a record-setting bid of $27,500.The Grand Champion Market Barrow exhibited by Elijah Keplinger of Clark County sold to Bob Evans, Ohio Farm Bureau, Tim Huffman, Ohio Harness Horseman’s Association, and Event Marketing Strategies for $33,000.    The Reserve Grand Champion Market Barrow exhibited by Riley Wendt of Union County sold to Kroger for a record-setting bid of $35,000.The Grand Champion Market Beef exhibited by Elizabeth Heintz Hardin County sold to Steve Rauch Excavation and Demolition for $50,000.The Reserve Grand Champion Market Beef exhibited by Delaney Jones of Allen County sold to Steve Rauch Excavation and Demolition, Mark Kvamme, and Meijer for a record-setting $56,000.last_img read more

What renters who want a smart home should consider

first_img“We are seeing so many of those features very quickly being adopted into apartments,” he said. “Technologies like Nest thermostats and ecosystems which are being developed by Google. Where you have a Nest thermostat and some of the additional features that can be controlled with your smartphone device within the unit. Whether it is the locks, camera or security feature, we are seeing a lot of interest in those.” Duggan says that in some cases, for instance for removable insulation jackets, utility providers such as National Grid will offer incentives for landlords to install the more efficient removable jackets to cut down on heat loss on building components. James is a marketing, communications, and PR professional specializing in B2B and B2C software in healthcare, software, and technology.He is an innovative and proactive builder focused on bridging C-level business demands with the creative side of marketing with product and content marketing. Follow the Puck “We have a massive amount of data about what people are really valuing and what people really want, and again three years ago we didn’t do that,” he said. “So I ask myself, companies that aren’t doing that how do you really know what your residents really want.” James Calder “Tenants especially under 30, have a very positive reaction to smart locks and key fobs versus traditional metal keys,” he said. “The added security and convenience is definitely appreciated.” Steve Duggan is a Licensed real estate Salesperson at CitiHabitats in New York City. Duggan is noticing a heavy investment in smart technology. The team at GreyStar is actively gathering data from its enormous network of residents. The companies email surveys receive a 28 percent response rate, which translates on a monthly basis to about 70,000 responses. “We are an apartment company, that is our niche our expertise and what we exclusively do,” Livingstone said. “At GreyStar we do three things, we manage apartments, mostly for third party owners, but we also manage apartments that we own ourselves. We also are a developer and construction company of apartments. We have about 6 billion dollars of development going on right now so domestically we are the largest developer of apartments. We are also an investment management company. We call that the three legs of the stool and that is what we do and how we do it.” “I think we are usually looking at number one, is the technology in demand, do people think it will have an impact on their experience,” he said. “And if we think it is a technology that is going to be in demand we then focus on how can we make that technology work well, because a lot of technologies have promised that they will work, but just really don’t work well in multi family.” I reached out to a couple of people in this industry to gain a better understanding of how the real estate apartment landscape is quickly shifting. See also: Smart homes are more hackable with IoT devicesAndrew Livingstone, is Executive Managing Director at GreyStar, one of the largest property management company in the U.S. and possibly the world. The company manages about 425,000 apartments across 45 U.S., with operations in the UK, the Netherlands, Mexico, and soon to be expanding into Asia Pacific. Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… “I am not so sure that is at all in the life plan of so many in the younger generation today,” he said. “So that means multifamily is an asset class of choice and not just one that is a temporary place but in fact, they are looking to have that as a key part of their life. They want flexibility and amenities without having all of the responsibilities and risk of homeownership. I don’t see that changing over the next few decades.” Related Posts “I am seeing investors who do renovation work or value add projects as well as current landlords looking to be more efficient, increasingly looking at technology to boost their operating income,” he said. “The use of an Energy Star certified thermostat like Nest, smart locks, and customized removable insulation jackets to prevent heat loss, are being increasingly employed to reduce costs.” Tags:#featured#Google#Internet of Things#IoT#Nest#Smart homes#top Livingstone said GreyStar doesn’t necessarily think about tech as an amenity first, but it is absolutely on their radar. According to the National Multifamily Housing Council, 35 percent of the U.S. population — or 112 million residents — rent vs own. Historically speaking these people tend to live in urban areas and the demographics trend younger in age. That demographic is also more likely to want technology as an amenity.“More and more multifamily is going to play a bigger more dominant role in all cities,” Livingstone said. “So to really advance what smart cities are all about, multifamily is going to play a huge role.” According to Livingstone many of the technologies that apartments are implementing feel like they are starting from the single family market. Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to… Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Single family homes used to have the monopoly on smart home products. Technology not only changes how things are built but it makes them function better. As a marketing director of an IoT company serving multi family and campus communities, I keep a close eye on the big property management companies and developers. But does everyone want to buy?He explained that there was a time when most people viewed apartments as a pit stop on their final destination towards home ownership.last_img read more

Tips for Making High-Quality Small-Budget Video Tutorials

first_imgWorking on a small budget with minimal workspace? Boost the quality of your video tutorials with these helpful tips and tricks for your home studio.I’ve been creating video tutorials for several years now. I’ve produced them on the road, in tiny apartments, and almost always as a lone wolf. As a result, I’ve picked up a lot of knowledge along the way. Today, I want to share some of my favorite advice with you. These tips are aimed at you folks getting started making tutorials — the ones working from home, on a limited budget. These tricks will help keep your production quality high, while working on a small budget with minimal space.  LightingFor a while, I was using a few big soft boxes to keep my lighting consistent, but now I’m a stay-at-home dad with an eight month-old baby who’s just learning how to crawl. So, it’s quite dangerous to have light stands around. Also, constantly setting these up and breaking them down every day is not practical. So, what are some other options for lighting? As I’m sure you’ve heard in plenty of other tutorials, using natural light is always great. In fact, my setups almost always involve using 90 percent natural light. The downside to working with window light is that it will constantly change, and you can only shoot at particular times of day. Also, you might not have a window — or live in Alaska. As an alternative, I suggest purchasing a few small LED lights from Aputure. These wonderful little lights are bicolor, dimmable, and they don’t get too hot. These are perfect for my situation because I don’t have to put them on a light stand and plug them in — they’re very small and run on batteries. I often place one on my desk and use it as a fill light, bouncing it off the wall. Both the F7 and MX are budget-friendly, and you can use both in any situation — as a key, fill, or backlight. I can even throw one in the background as an accent light.BackgroundIf you’re working in a small or shared living space, you might not have the option to set up a custom background for your shot. This can lead to revealing personal areas of your living space, including personal items. When I’m watching someone on camera, I always feel weird looking at their bed in the background. Or if everything is in sharp focus, my eyes will wander around curiously to their bookshelves and nightstands.I like to make sure that I don’t have anything too distracting in the background. To help keep the viewer’s attention on me, I simply blur it out. To achieve the blur, I open up the aperture to give the shot a shallow depth of field. If you can’t get a good blur, you can always use medium or close-up shots to help crop out any distracting items. It’s also helpful to keep the camera around eye level, so the viewer isn’t gazing awkwardly down or up at you. Last, but not least, windows can also help provide a more dynamic background.Framing and CompositionWhen you’re working by yourself, it can be a huge pain just trying to finesse the framing of your shot. For this reason, it’s great to get a camera with a flip-around screen. Alternatively, you can monitor your shot with your TV. My tutorial camera setup unfortunately doesn’t have a flip screen, so I simply plug the camera directly into my television via an HDMI cable, and turn it around so I can see the shot.Another trick is to vary the composition of your shot, which will give you options in the edit room. If you shoot everything with the same framing, it might prove difficult to avoid jump cuts. For this, you can simply shoot several takes at various compositions, or shoot in 4K. Shooting in 4K will allow you to scale and reframe your shot when editing in a 1920×1080 sequence. AudioI would prefer to use a nice shotgun mic with a mic stand and a shock-mount. But once again, this takes up quite a bit of room, and it can be pricey. You can pick up USB plug-and-play mics such as the Yeti Nano that are relatively cheap and very high quality. However, another issue I’ve run into is that these table mics will pick up the hum of external hard drives and vibrations from keyboards. To avoid this, you can get a boom arm to attach to your desk. I currently use the Yeticaster from Blue Microphones, which comes with the popular Blue Yeti mic attached to a shock mount on a boom arm. I have limited desk space, so it’s perfect, as I just push it out of the way when I’m not recording. When I’m traveling, I take the Yeti Nano.That’s it! Now, it’s time to put these tips into action and create some high-quality video tutorials.Interested in the tracks we used to make this video?“Heartbeartz” by Cali“Glowlight” by Ethan RankLooking for more video production tutorials? Check these out.Learn to Create Your Own 8-Bit Art in Adobe After EffectsHow to Properly Film Windows for Daytime Interior ScenesSimple Tips on How You Can Capture Better Slow-Motion VideoHow to Alter the Color of Your Video Using Lumetri CurvesVideo Tutorial: How to Use Premiere’s New Freeform Viewlast_img read more