Governor Wolf, Secretary Redding Celebrate Perdue Soybean Plant Opening; Tout ‘Jobs that Pay,’ Expanded Market Opportunities for PA Farmers

first_imgGovernor Wolf, Secretary Redding Celebrate Perdue Soybean Plant Opening; Tout ‘Jobs that Pay,’ Expanded Market Opportunities for PA Farmers September 25, 2017 Economy,  Innovation,  Jobs That Pay,  Press Release Bainbridge, PA – Governor Tom Wolf and Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding today joined Perdue Farms Chairman Jim Perdue and other company and local officials to celebrate the opening of Pennsylvania’s first large-scale, commercial soybean processing plant.The Lancaster County plant will create 35 family-sustaining local jobs and hundreds more in the state’s supply and distribution chain for agricultural products. The plant also promises to more than double the state’s soybean processing capacity, providing better prices and increased demand for area soybean farmers’ crops.“This plant is a game changer for farmers in Pennsylvania, opening new lanes of supply, new markets, and new opportunities in the commonwealth’s agriculture economy,” Governor Wolf said. “My administration is committed to making sure that the agriculture economy is strong, and working for our commonwealth’s farm families and businesses.”Purdue Agribusiness received an $8.75 million Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program grant from the commonwealth, which spurred an investment in Pennsylvania’s economy of more than six times that amount. It will continue to pay off in the form of new jobs and expanded market opportunities for area soybean growers and livestock farmers.“This plant builds on Perdue’s investment in Pennsylvania and our commitment to Pennsylvania farmers,” said Perdue Farms Chairman Jim Perdue. “It also sets a new standard in terms of community investment, economic potential and environmental gains. We truly appreciate all of the support we received from the governor and his entire administration to get this project up and running. This plant demonstrates our shared commitment to ensure agriculture remains strong and farmers have every advantage they need to remain competitive.”The $60 million facility has the capacity to process 17.5 million bushels of soybeans per year, producing soybean meal and oil that is then sold as animal feed ingredients and as inputs for food processors, among other uses.“When the state committed to this project, it did so because we recognized the opportunities it held for Pennsylvania’s farmers,” said Agriculture Secretary Russell Redding. “This plant is going to create new demand for soybeans grown here, and it’s going to help existing growers get a better price because they won’t have to ship their beans out of state, and it’s going to offer another close-to-home option for processed soybean meal they can use to feed their animals.”The new plant is strategically located in the heart of Pennsylvania’s richest agricultural region, within 50 miles of seven of the top 10 soybean-producing counties in the state. Pennsylvania farmers produced 29.6 million bushels of soybeans in 2014, and consumed 44 million bushels of soybean meal.Most soybean producers previously had to transport their crops out of state for processing, then back to the state for sale. The new plant more than doubles the capacity for Pennsylvania-produced crops to be processed locally.For more information on the new Perdue soybean processing plant, visit www.perdueagribusinesspa.com.To learn more about the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture and the Wolf administration’s work to grow the industry, visit agriculture.pa.gov or on Facebook or Twitter.center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Murray gets big birthday present in Rome

first_imgROME (AP):Andy Murray celebrated his 29th birthday by beating Novak Djokovic on clay for the first time to win the Italian Open title yesterday in a match that Djokovic argued should have been stopped due to rain.Gaining a measure of revenge for his loss to Djokovic in the Madrid Open final a week ago, the third-ranked Murray defeated the top-ranked Serb 6-3, 6-3.”The finals of a Masters series on clay is something that’s a new experience for me,” Murray said. “It’s nice to still be sort of achieving new things and reaching new goals at this stage of my career.”During the trophy ceremony, Murray was presented with a birthday cake. He dedicated the title to his three-month-old daughter, Sophia Olivia.”I feel like that’s what I’m playing for now, so that in a few years, hopefully, she can be proud of what I have achieved,” Murray said.NINE-MONTH TITLE DROUGHTEarlier, Serena Williams ended a nine-month title drought with a 7-6 (5), 6-3 win over Madison Keys in an all-American women’s final.Williams’ previous title came in Cincinnati in August a month before her attempt at a calendar-year Grand Slam ended with a semi-final loss to Roberta Vinci at the U.S. Open.”It feels great,” Williams said, pointing out that she’s only played four tournaments since Cincinnati. “So it’s not like I was playing every week. That’s kind of how I look at it, but it feels great to win a title, especially on clay.”It’s Murray’s first title in Rome and it comes exactly a week before the French Open begins.”The last couple of years, clay has probably been my most successful surface, which I never expected,” Murray said.The only other British man to win the Italian Open was Pat Hughes in 1931.”It’s mostly great players who have won this event, so I’m very proud to have my name on the trophy,” Murray said.Djokovic had won all four of their previous matches on clay, but had to fight fatigue following draining wins over Rafael Nadal and Kei Nishikori.Djokovic also played with a bandage on his left ankle after bruising himself with his racket a day earlier.”It was a week with a lot of emotions, a lot of hours on the court,” Djokovic said. “It wasn’t easy to be fresh today and have the strength to play with Andy. He was just too good today, and he deserved it.”For much of the men’s final, steady rain fell and fans covered themselves with ponchos and held up umbrellas to keep themselves dry.Djokovic argued several times with chair umpire Damian Steiner over the court conditions, saying it was too slippery.”I don’t want to play anymore,” Djokovic told the umpire late in the second set.”I didn’t ask to postpone the match,” Djokovic explained later. “I asked to have a little break, where we would give a little more time, maybe five more minutes, to people to arrange the court.”For Williams, it was her fourth title in Rome, which puts her in position to defend her title at Roland Garros.”I’m feeling pretty fit, so I’m looking forward to it,” said Williams, who won’t have to answer any questions about a potential calendar-year Grand Slam in Paris this year. “I’m going to definitely go in there and feel more calm and (not) feel stress to have to win.”Williams addressed the crowd in Italian during the post-match ceremony then took a selfie as she posed with the trophy.It was the first time two American women would have met in a final on clay since Serena beat older sister, Venus, in the 2002 French Open.When they met at the net after the match, Serena told the 24th-ranked Keys that she could be No. 1 one day.”Too bad what she says doesn’t just happen,” the 21-year-old Keys said. “But it’s always great to hear that from her. … Hearing that is definitely something that makes me just work harder.”last_img read more