Marriott shines at Hancock County’s Night of 1,000 Stars

first_imgHunter Marriott was the $3,500 IMCA Modified feature winner at Hancock County Speedway’s 24th annual Night of 1,000 Stars special. (Photo by Chad Meyer)BRITT, Iowa (Aug. 9) – Hunter Marriott starred on a different night Thursday at Hancock County Speedway.Marriott battled Cayden Carter and Kyle Strickler before taking charge late in Thursday’s 24th annual Night of 1,000 Stars main event at Britt, earning $3,500 for the 50-lap IMCA Modified victory.“I was patient and when I had opportunities I took advantage of them,” Marriott said following his latest Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot-qualifying win. “I got to second right away after the break and passed for the lead with about eight laps to go.”Last year’s event runner-up as well as the two-time defending Night of 10,000 Stars winner, Marriott had worked his way toward the front from the 12th starting spot as early leader Strickler gave way to Carter following a restart.Carter was dominant to the mandatory pit stop on lap 25, pocketing $1,000 for leading at halfway.Marriott was up to third at that point and soon in pursuit of Strickler after the race went back to green.The last 25 laps ran caution-free and Strickler, Marriott and Carter battled back and forth the last 10 times around the oval.Strickler and Marriott touched twice racing for the lead before Marriott was able to work his way through lapped traffic and pull ahead by a couple car lengths.Carter, Strickler, Mike Mashl and Jeff Aikey completed the top five. Kelly Shryock started 19th and finished sixth.George Nordman won the  Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMod feature and $750. The $600 IMCA Sunoco Stock Car win went to Jake Masters and Cody Nielsen topped the IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks for a $500 check.Feature ResultsModifieds – 1. Hunter Marriott; 2. Cayden Carter; 3. Kyle Strickler; 4. Mike Mashl; 5. Jeff Aikey; 6. Kelly Shryock; 7. Benji LaCrosse; 8. Ethan Dotson; 9. Tim Ward; 10. Todd Van Eaton; 11. Joel Rust; 12. Jeremy Mills; 13. Clay Money; 14. Mike Mullen; 15. Corey Dripps; 16. Josh Long; 17. Tom Berry Jr.; 18. Aaron Benson; 19. Randy Foote; 20. Jason Wolla; 21. Kody Scholpp; 22. Kollin Hibdon; 23. Nick Meyer; 24. Stacey Mills; 25. Troy Swearingen; 26. Jay Noteboom; 27. Mark Noble; 28. Richie Gustin; 29. Jesse Hoeft; 30. Jimmy Gustin; 31. Ryan Ruter.Stock Cars – 1. Jake Masters; 2. Craig Berhow; 3. Heath Tulp; 4. Randy Brands; 5. Cody Frerichs; 6. Pete Alexander; 7. Kody Scholpp; 8. Scott Yale; 9. Derek Moede; 10. Jeff Dolphin; 11. Parker Slagle; 12. Andrew Borchardt; 13. Buck Schafroth.Hobby Stocks – 1. Cody Nielsen; 2. Chanse Hollatz; 3. Drew Barglof; 4. Scott Dobel; 5. Tony Smidt; 6. Blaine Hanson; 7. Ben Peterson; 8. Tommy Beekman; 9. Kenzie Ritter.Northern SportMods – 1. George Nordman; 2. Cody Thompson; 3. Mathew Hanson; 4. Johnathon Logue; 5. Colby Fett; 6. Andrew Inman; 7. Ryan Hiscocks; 8. Ethan Braaksma; 9. Nate Whitehurst; 10. Brady Joynt; 11. Brett Meyer; 12. Autumn Anderson; 13. Tyler Bragg; 14. Gerald Curry; 15. Nate VanSchepen; 16. Thomas Nelson; 17. Jeremiah LaDue; 18. Greg Magsam.last_img read more

Another $150,000 for Passivhaus

first_imgCabinets are expected to cost an additional $22,000, to go along with $10,000 to make it universally accessible, and almost $16,000 to change the site to behind the current fire hall. Senior management also made the decision to build it to certify with German Passivhaus Standards, which brings a $44,000 price tag, plus the additional cost of specific “certified” building material. “We could have built it without the certification, but built it Passivhaus-like, but really because it’s a demonstration project, we really lose a lot of status that comes with it if you don’t go for the full certification to prove that you can do it in Fort St. John,” argues Hunter. In addition to all that, some of the costs like excavation and crane fees that were already approved were higher than expected, to the tune of over $22,000. All together, based on the original scope of the project, it is approximately $40,000 over budget, and the completed project cost with the extra work is expected to be $490,000. Despite that, it’s believed the house will still achieve council’s goal of having it cost no more per square foot than a standard house in Fort St. John. Advertisement “When you build this house this far north, there’s lessons that you learn,” admits Ackerman. “We believe that we have built a good example of how it will work.” Once finished, the Passivhaus would be the most northern in Canada, matched worldwide only by one in Finland. $300,000 was originally included in the 2013 Capital Budget, and the additional $150,000 will come from the Fair Share Reserve. Council only decided in late April that the house will be used as a temporary living area and recruitment incentive for new employees for the first year, and be turned into a single family home. “In order for us to encourage others who are building homes and developers to take this route, to get the real return on the investment, to see what that’s going to be, you need to have a family living in there,” maintains Mayor Lori Ackerman. – Advertisement -However, City Manager Dianne Hunter explains that meant the addition of work like cabinets, appliances, and furniture to the original plan. “Once council made the decision that we would like to put a family in there, and monitor its energy consumption,” she says, “then of course we realized we needed to put a kitchen in there, and then finish it and bring it up to occupancy permit stage.” Advertisementlast_img read more