Preds spoils Sharks clinching party at the Tank

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceSAN JOSE — The party will need to wait for at least two more days.The Nashville Predators spoiled the Sharks opportunity to clinch a spot in the Stanley Cup playoffs for the 14th time in 15 years on Saturday, earning a 4-2 win at SAP Center. In doing so, the Predators handed the Sharks their first back-to-back regulation losses at home this season.The loss also cost the Sharks an opportunity to regain first place in …last_img read more

White Blood Cells Walk to Infection on Tiny Legs

first_img51; How do white blood cells know where to go when infection strikes?  The cells have tiny little feet and crawl like millipedes, against the blood stream, if necessary, following signals from the infection site.  When they arrive, more signals tell them where to slip through the cells of the blood vessel to get to the job.  This amazing story was reported by Science Daily based on a press release from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel (see Wiezmann Wonder Wander).  Here’s how they described this phenomenon:How do white blood cells – immune system ‘soldiers’ – get to the site of infection or injury?  To do so, they must crawl swiftly along the lining of the blood vessel – gripping it tightly to avoid being swept away in the blood flow – all the while searching for temporary ‘road signs’ made of special adhesion molecules that let them know where to cross the blood vessel barrier so they can get to the damaged tissue.    In research recently published in the journal Immunity, Prof. Ronen Alon and his research student Ziv Shulman of the Weizmann Institute’s Immunology Department show how white blood cells advance along the length of the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels.  Current opinion maintains that immune cells advance like inchworms, but Alon’s new findings show that the rapid movement of the white blood cells is more like that of millipedes.  Rather than sticking front and back, folding and extending to push itself forward, the cell creates numerous tiny ‘legs’ no more than a micron in length – adhesion points, rich in adhesion molecules (named LFA-1) that bind to partner adhesion molecules present on the surface of the blood vessels.  Tens of these legs attach and detach in sequence within seconds – allowing them to move rapidly while keeping a good grip on the vessels’ sides.The press release went on to say that these legs don’t just walk.  They act as probes as they press into the epithelial tissue lining the vessels.  The force of blood actually forces them to embed their little legs into the tissue as a way to sense the location of the damaged tissue and make their way to it.  “The scientists believe that the tiny legs are trifunctional:,” the article said: “Used for gripping, moving and sensing distress signals from the damaged tissue.”A reader found an animation of this at Harvard BioVisions.  Click on the media file labeled “Extravasation” and it will show you some of the parts and processes involved.    It’s uncanny how the actions of these cells lacking a brain, muscles or central nervous system can act so precisely and effectively, they can be compared to multicellular organisms with all those systems.  You can almost visualize these cells like ambulance crew members or soldiers in specially designed vehicles able to cling to attachment points against the flow of traffic.  They seem so well trained and effective, it looks like they do what they do on purpose.  What a concept.(Visited 42 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South Africa’s rhino fight takes to the air

first_img29 November 2013 South African National Parks (SANParks) is to beef up its arsenal in the fight against rhino poaching with the deployment of a Gazelle military helicopter. The Gazelle was donated by the Ichikowitz Family Foundation and African aerospace and defence group Paramount, and forms part of an on-going capacity building partnership announced a year ago. A Seeker MKII Surveillance aeroplane, also donated by the foundation, has been operating in the Kruger National Park since December 2012. Speaking at the helicopter’s unveiling at Letaba in Limpopo province on Thursday, SANParks CEO David Mabunda thanked the Ichikowitz Family Foundation for their involvement, which has included the provision of fuel, pilots, specialised training and operational capacity. Ivor Ichikowitz, the chairman of the foundation and founder of the Paramount Group, said the Gazelle would give SANParks superior airpower in its fight against rhino poachers. The light attack helicopter has a maximum airspeed of 310 kilometres per hour and a range of 670 kilometres. “A critical part of this helicopter’s capabilities is its speed and the fact that the Gazelle has a night vision capable cockpit,” Ichikowitz said, adding “Part of our contribution is to the training of the pilots to be able to fly at night, thereby fundamentally taking the war directly to the poachers.”Kruger rhino census Mabunda, outlining the results of a census conducted a few months ago, said it was estimated that the Kruger National Park was home to between 8 400 and 9 600 white rhino. SANParks scientists conducted the census using a 40% block count survey method. The census took three weeks to complete in September, making use of three helicopters with a total of 220 flight hours. The bottom line, Mabunda said, was that despite escalating poaching, increased anti-poaching operations had ensured that there were relatively stable rhino numbers in the park since 2008. “We are certain that without intense anti-poaching operations, Kruger’s rhino population would have begun significantly declining by now.” Ichikowitz said that, with the Gazelle now part of SANParks’ anti-poaching operations, “we hope that the fight for the rhino will reach a tipping point in 2014”. He added that his foundation was assisting SANParks with further training of its game rangers in advanced bush tracking techniques, and together with Paramount would be providing SANParks with tracker dogs and related training in 2014. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

The 2018 Ohio Crop Tour – I-71 Leg – Day 2

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Clinton CountyCorn: This April 27th corn was all around good. Color was nice, ear fill was solid and very little disease and insect pressure to speak of. The ears were a good size but only 14 around. Even with that into consideration, our yield check is at 175.Soybeans: These non-GMO beans were planted on May 18th. They were very clean with only minor insect feeding here. Canopy height was 28 inches and distance between nodes was 2 inches. We rate this field as Poor to Fair.Overall County Observations – Just as consistent as we have seen the last 3 stops. Stress is hard to come by here and they got a good bit of rain today that will help been finish off.Click on the pictures for a closer lookClinton CountyClinton CountyClinton CountyClinton CountyClinton CountyClinton CountyHighland CountyCorn: This farmer told us that a big July storm knocked some of this corn down and we noticed that as we headed in for a sample. Bird damage has been an issue here for a few years now. Development still has a way to go here but the crop looks strong. Our yield guess is 190.Soybeans: When we first took a broad look at this field we knew something wasn’t right. Some yellowing was taking place in numerous parts of these beans. The farmer told us he has been doing some sampling and the plant is having trouble taking up potash. Something he will work on next year. Canopy height was 36 inches and there were 2 inches between nodes. Noticed green stink bugs and Japanese Beetles. We rate this field as Good.Overall County Observations – More good looking crops here. Even beans all over. Some fields, even though we are in Southern Ohio, we planted a little later than some of our previous fields north of here.Click on the photos for a better viewHighland CountyHighland CountyHighland CountyHighland CountyHighland CountyHighland CountyHighland CountyHighland CountyFayette CountyCorn: These ears looked bigger than any we have seen, but many of them were only 14 around, hurting our final yield count. These have fired up to the ear leaf. Some Grey and Northern, but not above the ear. We passed a few wet spots are we walked to our scout spot. Pretty healthy looking otherwise and this area is getting some rain that the soil looks like it needed. Our yield estimate is 155.Soybeans: Some SDS taking hold in this field and we also came across some Cercospora Leaf Blight here. Canopy height was 36 inches and distance between nodes was 2 inches. Low pressure from disease and insects and we rate this field as Good.Overall County Observations – They are getting a lot of rain here today and by the looks of things, there was water here early too. Fairly uniform through this area for both corn and beans.Click on the pictures for a closer lookFayette CountyFayette CountyFayette CountyFayette CountyFayette CountyFayette CountyFayette CountyFayette CountyRoss CountyCorn: This field was planted on May 12th and this is a low laying area. Because of that, some of this plot that was planted never came up. The majority of this field is a full dent and starting to mature. This population was higher and moisture was still just fine. Ear fill was great and the ears were heavy. Low insect and disease pressure here. Our yield guess is 201.Soybeans: These beans are a high-oleic and was planted on May 3rd. Canopy height was 48 inches with 2.5 inches between nodes. It was tough getting through the field due to some lodging issues. Once we found our spot, we saw heavy Frogeye and some SDS showing up. These beans were well podded but the insect and disease pressures may present some challenges to this crop. There was even some pod feeding here which we haven’t seen until now. We rate this field as Fair.Overall County Observation – Things continue to look good here overall. Moisture has been adequate here compared to the early part of Day 2. That moisture, along with humidity, has disease hitting the soybeans more than we’ve noticed in other counties.For a better view, click on the picturesRoss CountyRoss CountyRoss CountyRoss CountyRoss CountyRoss CountyRoss CountyRoss CountyFairfield CountyCorn: This was the most disease pressure we have seen in corn so far this week, at least above the ear (which all of the leaves pictures were). GLS, Northern and Holcus Leaf Spot. This was one of the highest populations we have seen at 34,000 in one of the spots we were in and kernels were deep. Even with the issues listed about, this is the highest yielding field, by our estimate, so far on tour at 222.Soybeans: Found some issues with this field, including Downey Mildew, Frogeye and insects. Got one shot of Japanese Beetles and a Stinkbug in the pictures. The canopy for 40 inches and distance between nodes was 2 inches. Pod set was average, roots were strong and overall a nice field of beans. We rate it as Good.Overall County Observations – Summer has been very easy on this part of the state. Crops look healthy and firing is at a minimum. Farmers in this county should be excited about what’s to come.Click on the photos for a closer lookFairfield CountyFairfield CountyFairfield CountyFairfield CountyFairfield CountyFairfield CountyFairfield CountyFairfield CountyPickaway CountyCorn: The corn was planted on May 1st and is finishing dent stage. Stand was above average and ears were just about as perfect as we have seen this week. Our yield calc here is 192.Soybeans: This May 16th planted field looked like carpet. These 3.2 beans had a canopy height of 36 inches and there were 2 to 3 inches between nodes. Saw a little Frogeye and minimal insect feeding. We rate this field as Good.Overall County Observations – This county also got a lot of rain early on, but Mother Nature shaped up for a good part of the growing season. Corn looks healthy and even and is a great shade of green.Click on the pictures for a closer lookPickaway CountyPickaway CountyPickaway CountyPickaway CountyPickaway CountyPickaway CountyPickaway CountyPickaway CountyMadison CountyCorn: This was a Farm Science Review 99-day corn already drying down and it was a nice stand. They have had a dry spell here over the growing season and the rains they are getting now are coming a little too late. We noticed some tip-back with some starting to abort kernels. Some GLS but mostly below the ear. Our yield guess here is 171.Soybeans: A low population here, but an excellent stand. We are getting a good amount of rain here now and that will be a great way to finish these beans off. Canopy height was 35 inches and distance between nodes was 2 inches. Very low disease and insect pressure and this field is rated Good to Excellent by our crew.Overall County Observations – Things here look much more uniform that what we have seen so far today. Many fields here were planted earlier in the season.Madison CountyMadison CountyMadison CountyMadison CountyMadison CountyMadison CountyMadison CountyMadison CountyClark CountyCorn: As you can see by the picture, most of the disease pressure here was below the ear. This was a pretty good field of corn with light insect pressure and excellent ear fill. There was some weeds that got away from this farmer by it won’t too bad at this point. Our yield calc is 175.Soybeans: This was our first spotting of white mold in soybeans along with some SDS setting in, but they have podded nicely and they were tall. Canopy height was 46 inches and nodes were 2 1/2 inches apart. We rate this field as Good to Excellent.Overall County Observations – This area surely had a lot of early potential and that potential hung on with some nicer weather than just east of here to help this crop along.For a better view, click the photosClark CountyClark CountyClark CountyClark CountyClark CountyClark CountyClark CountyClark CountyChampaign CountyCorn: We found twin-row corn here and found out it was planted on April 30th. They got more rain here then they wanted and it hurt early on. Firing was happening about and below the ear in one of the spots we sampled. Our yield guess here is 155.Soybeans: These beans thin out quite a bit in some areas and we found grasshoppers, stink bugs and Japanese Beetles. Canopy height was 32 inches high and nodes were 2.5 inches apart. 15 inch rows here and we rate this field as Poor to Fair.Overall County Observations – Things have changed dramatically here compared to what we saw yesterday. Some of the best dirt has some of the worst looking crops and heavy rains and then no moisture at all are to blame. We are seeing many different shades of green this morning.For a closer look, click the picturesChampaign CountyChampaign CountyChampaign CountyChampaign CountyChampaign CountyChampaign CountyChampaign CountyChampaign CountyUnion CountyCorn: This field is very fall along in full dent. Planted on May 7th, this was a good stand, but some firing has begun here. Shouldn’t make a difference this time of year for this field. Population at one of our check points was a little low due to some gaps. Ear fill was excellent. Our yield number here is 187.Soybeans: This was the field variable bean field we have seen on tour so far. Also the heaviest Frogeye we have come across. Canopy height was 36 inches with 2 inches in between nodes. Planting date was May 14th. Our rating for this field is Good.Overall County Observations – This area received some much needed rain this morning, but it is easy to see they had plenty of moisture early with some water spots. Variability was noticeable throughout the county.Click on the pictures for a better lookUnion CountyUnion CountyUnion CountyUnion CountyUnion CountyUnion CountyUnion CountyUnion Countylast_img read more

Use of Spray Foam Insulation Drops

first_imgBuilders may be backing away from spray foam insulation.Between 2008 and 2012, spray foam’s market share grew from 3% in new home construction to 11%, a nearly four-fold increase. But last year, according to a survey from the Home Innovation Research Labs, its market share fell to about 8% as more builders returned to an old favorite: fiberglass.Fiberglass batts and blown-in fiberglass continue to dominate the insulation market with 55% and 19% shares respectively, the Home Innovation Annual Builder Practices Survey found. Other choices include rock wool, rigid foam board, and cellulose.“While we all recognize that a one-year data shift does not constitute a trend in building product usage, this may be signaling a change in the home insulation landscape,” the report said.Researchers found a variety of reasons for the spike in interest for spray-foam insulation, which is a more expensive option than cellulose or fiberglass but is valued for its high R-values (roughly R-6 per inch for closed-cell spray polyurethane) and its air-sealing qualities in floors, walls, and roofs.Using closed-cell foam on the underside of the roof deck turns the attic into a conditioned space and allows builders to put heating and air conditioning ducts as well as HVAC equipment in the attic without paying an energy penalty. Builders have an easier time of explaining the benefits of spray foam to home buyers, the report said, and using the insulation makes it easier to comply with tougher energy codes.Some builders are still willing to pay the higher cost for spray foam insulation, and it’s found a niche in luxury homes and with builders who do ten or fewer homes per year, the report said. But overall, fiberglass is king, with a market share that actually grew slightly between 2012 and 2013. It’s used in about 75% of new homes. A variety of factors may explain the declineThe report said that it’s not entirely clear why fewer builders seem to be using spray foam, but the Annual Builder Practices Survey of 2013 points to a number of possible reasons. For one, the survey found that builders were trying to economize by using fewer and less expensive materials in the houses they build, the report said.In addition, there are now other options for building well-insulated homes with lower air leakage rates, including Huber Zip roof and wall sheathing, spray-on air sealants, denser fiberglass batts with higher R-values per inch, raised-heel trusses (also called energy trusses) that allow more insulation to be installed at the perimeter of the building, and foam-board wall sheathing.Another possible explanation comes in the mix of homes that are being built. Spray foam insulation is more common in high-end homes, the report said, but the market seems to be shifting toward multifamily rentals.“And there is another very simple reason that may be at play — some home builders tried spray foam insulation but have returned to the materials they were using before,” the report says. “A survey conducted by Home Innovation Labs in 2013 showed that 30 percent of builders who have used spray foam in the past are not using it now.“In our research, we often hear builders state that fiberglass, by far the most popular home insulation material, is simply the most cost-effective, easy-to-install material for most applications.”last_img read more