Las Virgenes school parcel tax renewed, Antelope Valley school bond measure fails

first_imgWhile voters in the Las Virgenes School District were leaning toward renewing a $98 parcel tax known as Measure E, the Antelope Valley Joint Union High School District’s Measure W construction bond was losing, according to early results late Tuesday. First approved in 2004, Measure E is expected to generate more than $2 million a year and fund a variety of district programs including elementary science, counseling and library services, as well as extra curricular activities. The measure requires a 2/3 voter approval and amends the previous version by, among other things, exempting people receiving state disability benefits from the tax. If passed, the new measure would be in effect for eight years and allows more flexibility in how the money is spent by the district. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! In the Antelope Valley Joint Union High School District, Measure W was falling short of the 55 percent of votes needed for its passage. If passed, the $240 million bond would relieve school overcrowding by building two new high schools and completing construction on a third, as well as other improvements. The bond measure would assess property owners $30 a year per $100,000 of assessed valuation. It comes on the heals of Measure E, which received 52 percent of voter support in June 2006, failing to pass by just three percentage points. That measure also would have taxed property owners about $30 per $100,000 of assessed valuation annually. last_img read more

‘WE DON’T WANT TO SEGREGATE GAA FANS’ – CHAIR

first_imgTHE chairman of the county board PJ McGowan has said he will do everything to prevent segregating fans at GAA matches in the county.His comments come after a number of incidents at matches this year both in Donegal and at in other Ulster counties.Mr McGowan said the GAA did not want to introduce segregation for fans – or play games behind closed doors. He revealed that both gardai in the south and the PSNI in the north are looking at what arrangements can be made to prevent crowd trouble in the future.Meanwhile the five new members of the Executive are Sean McGinley (Kilcar) assistant secretary, Frankie Doherty (St. Eunan’s) assistant treasurer, Con O’Donnell (Moville) Oifigeach na Gaeililge agus Cultuir, Anthony Harkin (Ardara) Coaching Officer and Pat Conaghan (Killybegs) Ulster Council delegate. ‘WE DON’T WANT TO SEGREGATE GAA FANS’ – CHAIR was last modified: December 15th, 2011 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegalGAAlast_img read more

Preds spoils Sharks clinching party at the Tank

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile deviceSAN JOSE — The party will need to wait for at least two more days.The Nashville Predators spoiled the Sharks opportunity to clinch a spot in the Stanley Cup playoffs for the 14th time in 15 years on Saturday, earning a 4-2 win at SAP Center. In doing so, the Predators handed the Sharks their first back-to-back regulation losses at home this season.The loss also cost the Sharks an opportunity to regain first place in …last_img read more

Human Adaptation Can Be Rapid

first_imgHow long does it take for humans to adapt to environmental changes?  Some recent papers investigated this question.Paleface:  If it is assumed that humans started out medium or dark-skinned, how long did it take for Europeans to lose much of that original pigment?  An article in Science April 20 says maybe just 6,000 to 12,000 years.  “This contradicts a long-standing hypothesis that modern humans in Europe grew paler about 40,000 years ago, as soon as they migrated into northern latitudes,” the article states, reporting on a March meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.  Pale skin is said to have an adaptive value at high latitudes: “Under darker skies, pale skin absorbs more sunlight than dark skin, allowing ultraviolet rays to produce more vitamin D for bone growth and calcium absorption.”  The new date was based on genetic studies that suggested a “selective sweep occurred 5300 to 6000 years ago” or up to 12,000 years ago, “given the imprecision of method”.High life:  Ann Gibbons in Science reported on another discussion item from the American Association of Physical Anthropologists: how Tibetan children can tolerate the high altitude.  “Researchers seldom see Darwinian natural selection happening in living people,” she began.  “So physical anthropologist Cynthia Beall was delighted in 2004 when she discovered a trait that boosts the survival of some Tibetan children, apparently by raising the level of oxygen in their mothers’ tissues–a crucial advantage during pregnancy 4 kilometers above sea level.”  Updated research has revealed a genetic change that allows women to boost their blood volume and deliver more oxygen to the tissues.  Beall measured the selective pressure at 1:0.44, stronger than the fitness ratio measured for the sickle-cell gene.  They said, “the adaptation represents some of the strongest natural selection yet measured in humans.”    Surprisingly, this appears to be a different adaptation mechanism than that found in populations living in the Andes.  There, mothers are able to boost the amount of hemoglobin.  These correlations are uncertain, however; “it’s quite possible that the Tibetans have evolved more than one way to boost blood oxygen,” Beall cautioned.  Mark Gladwin threw in a Darwinian proverb: “Study the pregnant women, because that’s where you’ll see evolution in action.”Got milk?  Another strong selection effect in humans is for lactose tolerance.  Current Biology (April 17) had an article on this phenomenon, which “might have meant the difference between life and death” to early dairy farmers, Greg Gibson (North Carolina State U) said.  The admittedly imperfect ability to tolerate lactose represents another selective sweep some 5,000 to 10,000 years ago, about the time humans began to domesticate cattle.  He remarked, “It is hard to refute that this is a lovely example of the coevolution of genes and culture.”    Nevertheless, Gibson spent most of the article debunking the “thrifty genes” hypothesis of evolutionary selection.  This is a 45-year-old idea that the “high incidence of diabetes in modern humans is a result of positive selection for alleles that confer the ability to rapidly sequester rare caches of carbohydrates as fat that would tide us over during famine.”  This adaptation now works against us in our urbanized society, it is claimed: it tends us toward obesity.  So why does Gibson think this is a poor hypothesis?  “Unfortunately, these three preconditions for natural selection are all too often mistaken by adaptationists as both necessary and sufficient for evolution to occur,” he cautioned.  But we need to be more quantitative if sufficiency is to be proven.”  At the end, he was even more emphatic: “Those inclined toward Darwinian medicine like to explain disease as the price we pay for the beneficial effects of alleles that have accompanied human adaptation.  These cases of not-so-thrifty genes suggest though that we should not be so quick to jump on the bandwagon: the coevolution of genes and culture is tremendously more complex.”Funny he should mention Darwinian medicine.  A paper on that very subject appeared in Public Library of Science: Biology this month.  Catriona J. MacCallum tried again to make the case that medical doctors need to study evolution to understand disease (cf. 01/13/2003.  Distressed that medical schools are not considering evolution essential to the curriculum (see 06/25/2003), MacCallum wrote,It is curious that Charles Darwin, perhaps medicine’s most famous dropout, provided the impetus for a subject that figures so rarely in medical education.  Indeed, even the iconic textbook example of evolution—antibiotic resistance—is rarely described as “evolution” in relevant papers published in medical journals.  Despite potentially valid reasons for this oversight (e.g., that authors of papers in medical journals would regard the term as too general), it propagates into the popular press when those papers are reported on, feeding the wider perception of evolution’s irrelevance in general, and to medicine in particular.  Yet an understanding of how natural selection shapes vulnerability to disease can provide fundamental insights into medicine and health and is no less relevant than an understanding of physiology or biochemistry.MacCallum agreed that the “thrifty gene” concept has fallen into disfavor.  Some other evolutionary ideas are also simplistic: “The relationship between changing environment, diet, and susceptibility to disease, however, is also far from clear.”  Attempts to recreate a Stone-Age Diet “can be misleading,” she said.  Still, she promoted the idea that evolutionary concepts can help medical practice.  Granted, a mechanic may not need to understand the history of technology to fix a car, but an understanding of the evolutionary principles can help prepare for outbreaks of infectious disease, like bird flu, she argued.    Why the resistance to evolutionary teaching in medical schools?  In some cases, it’s the students who rebel:Although Paul O’Higgins thought a comparison of the brachial plexus to the pentadactyl limb was helpful, not all his students agreed—complaints were lodged that he was forcing evolution on them.  That lack of support was also reflected in the participation of only three medical students at the York meeting (albeit enthusiastic ones), despite being widely publicized.  It is not clear whether this is because medical students are more overburdened than most or because of a more deep-rooted resistance to the subject, reflecting wider political and religious prejudice against evolution.So what’s the solution?  “But evolutionary medicine isn’t and shouldn’t be controversial, and the best way to challenge prejudice is through education.”  She took refuge in the famous Dobzhansky quote, “Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution.”  As an experiment, let’s consider the three cases listed above.  It isn’t very controversial that survivors of lactose, decreased sunlight and oxygen will predominate in those environments, but aren’t they all still human?  Is this really the kind of evolution that Darwin meant?    MacCallum was undaunted by such questions.  “The time has clearly come for medicine to explicitly integrate evolutionary biology into its theoretical and practical underpinnings,” she ended with rhetorical flair.  “The medical students of Charles Darwin’s day did not have the advantage of such a powerful framework to inform their thinking; we shouldn’t deprive today’s budding medical talent of the potential insights to be gained at the intersection of these two great disciplines.”  Convincing the medical students of this may be the hard part.You do NOT want an evolutionary biologist in the room when you need TLC at the hospital.  Lying in bed with pain and weakness, you are not going to look like a fit individual who deserves to survive.    MacCallum again exhibited the shallowness and uselessness of evolutionary thinking.  Notice also the elitist snobbery: anyone who doesn’t agree with the Darwin Party Framework is prejudiced by definition, and must be sent to the re-education camp (cf. 12/21/2005).    Despite the pleas to pul-lease teach Darwin in medical school, medicine is doing fine without the help of Dropout Darwin.  Medicine has a multi-thousand year history that was advanced largely by Christians.  The examples she cited, including the “iconic textbook example” of evolution – antibiotic resistance (dealt a blow by Jonathan Wells in his book Icons of Evolution; see also the Darwinist confession from 09/12/2004) – are all just microevolutionary changes.  The three examples reported above are all microevolutionary changes.  Natural selection at the micro level is not the issue.  Even young-earth creationists accept that.    Such evidence has nothing to do with Darwin’s colossal simplistic generality, the Mystical Tree of Life (02/01/2007).  It has nothing to do with proving that humans have bacteria ancestors, and most medical students and professors know it.  You can almost hear the snickers of students in the classroom when the Prof tells his little fable about how the brachial plexus resembles the pentadactyl limb.  “Right, Teach.  Will that be on the test?  Can I take a pill and call you in the morning?”  Maybe the only way to get a higher turnout than three students at the next well-publicized “Medicine and Evolution” meeting is to award extra credit, provided the students are allowed to bring cots and pillows.    Despite the Dobzhansky rallying cry, things make perfect sense without evolution.  In none of the three cases listed above is Darwin vindicated or needed.  All the humans in those societies are still one species with the rest of humanity, capable of intermarrying and raising children.  What’s more, the adaptive changes observed did not take hundreds of thousands of years.  To the consternation of earlier Darwinists whose ideas are now discredited, the changes fit easily within a Biblical framework of human history.  What is Darwin’s score?  Even MacCallum admits that previous evolutionary ideas like “thrifty genes” have been discarded.  Is anything left that is not controversial and subject to overthrow?  We don’t need Darwin.  We don’t want Darwin.  We want to make sense in the light of the evidence, and help the weak in the process.(Visited 15 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

That’s a Geocache?!? The Unending Evolution of Geocaches

first_imgTraditional geocacheFor most, the evolution of the geocache container begins with a sturdy great-great-great-grandfather geocache.  It’s the iconic metal ammo can. But in one decade of geocaching, the geocache family tree branched off into dozens of directions.Each branch embodies the spirit of evolution.  Geocaches now blend more and more into their natural environment.  Say you place a cache on the outskirts of an estuary?  There’s a bird geocache for that.  You’re considering an urban cache on a park bench?  We’ve heard of magnetic microcaches that resemble gum for that.Take a quick look at the picture below on the left.  Guess how many geocaches are in that picture?  Ok, I know there are a few caveats. There can only be one geocache every tenth of a mile and none of these are activated, but how many possible geocaches do you see? The answer is… six. The bird, those pinecones, that rock, even two of the sticks are actually geocaches.How many geocaches are hidden in this pictureJust enough room for a logGeocaches are not the only part of the geocaching equation to evolve.  Geocachers developed a keener “geo-sense” over the past decade.  Say that you placed a corn cob shaped cache in field of corn… the cache will be found.A cache like this one pictured at the bottom of the page is all in a days work for an average cacher.I’d love to hear your most difficult find.  How many DNF’s did you log before uncovering the cache?  Let us know, just post a comment to this blog.Thermometer reveals a geocacheShare with your Friends:More SharePrint RelatedThe evolution of geocachesNovember 19, 2019In “Learn”Rubik’s Cache (GC5YGFM) – Geocache of the WeekJuly 30, 2015In “Geocache of the Week”350 miles, all for a smiley. — Munich – Venice (GC1FPN1) — Geocache of the WeekJune 12, 2013In “Community”last_img read more

Pumaren wants better decision-making from UE after 2nd loss

first_imgUE went just 1-of-4 in uncontested field goals while FEU was far better going 11-of-15.Passing was also a thorn on the Red Warriors’ game tallying just 19 assists as compared to FEU’s 26. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Phoenix trial begins for NBA players accused of assault NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ View comments Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Pumaren rued his team’s reliance on isolation plays instead of finding open shots and executing extra passes.“I was telling them to move the ball, don’t force shots, and I told them even after our game against NU [National University],” said Pumaren, whose team lost 86-69 against the Bulldogs in the opener.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games opening“It’s fine with me if you dribble and try to attack your man, go ahead, but if you’re just going to dribble the basketball and you know there are no stats in basketball that says ‘most number of dribbles.’”In their game against the Bulldogs, the Red Warriors went 4-of-8 on uncontested shots and that mark was worse against the Tamaraws. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAfter starting the season with two straight losses, University of the East head coach Derrick Pumaren wants a stronger mental game from his players.The Red Warriors dropped to 0-2 after losing to Far Eastern University, 90-83, in the UAAP Season 80 seniors’ basketball tournament at Smart Araneta Coliseum Wednesday.ADVERTISEMENT Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claimlast_img read more

Sachin Tendulkar’s elder brother Ajit undergoes bypass surgery

first_imgAjit TendulkarSachin Tendulkar’s elder brother Ajit, who was the single biggest influence on his cricket in his early days, had to undergo a bypass surgery last week at the Jaslok hospital.According to information available to IndiaToday.in, Ajit went through the knife last week and the operation was successfully performed by Dr. Sudhanshu Bhattacharya, one of the best known cardiac doctors in the country.Sachin’s wife Anjali, who is also a qualified doctor herself, along with another family member went to Dr. Bhattacharya for initial consultation after which he suggested bypass surgery over angioplasty. “There was a blockage in one of the main arteries that supplies 50 per cent of the blood to the heart. The best way to deal with such cases is to go for surgery as it means relief of lifetime. The patient can live for 35-40 years without any reintervention. I am glad he responded well to treatment,” Dr. Bhattacharya told IndiaToday.in.Sachin Tendulkar, who would make daily visits to the hospital, thanked well wishers through this tweet today. “A big thank you to all my friends for their prayers n good wishes. My brother Ajit is recovering well after undergoing a bypass surgery.”Ajit is 9 years elder to Sachin and was the man who spotted a special spark in Sachin’s free flowing stroke play and took him to coach Ramakant Achrekar when he was aged 11. Guru Achrekar went on to shape the diamond.last_img read more