QPR round-up: R’s unable to land winger, Barnsley want Kpekawa, Lumley set for loan move

first_imgQPR have missed out on the signing of Swansea City winger Modou Barrow.The 23-year-old Gambian was among Rangers’ top summer targets and the club were initially optimistic they would be able to take him on loan.However, Swansea stalled over a potential deal when he impressed during pre-season, forcing his way into their first team for the start of the new campaign.And with Barrow having also impressed in the Welsh club’s opening couple of Premier League matches, Rangers now accept he will not be joining them.Meanwhile, Barnsley have made an offer for QPR defender Cole Kpekawa.And Rangers have signed goalkeeper Seny Dieng after development squad keeper Conor Hudnott was ruled out for around six months with a shoulder injury.The Swiss 21-year-old was a free agent, having left German club MSV Duisburg at the end of last season.The signing means QPR can send goalkeeper Joe Lumley out on loan in the coming days.Lumley, 21, had been lined up for a loan move to Gillingham but that deal now appears unlikely to go through.Rangers are now looking at other options as they are keen for Lumley to pick up more first-team experience.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Why you can’t second guess the A’s starting Sean Manaea over Mike Fiers

first_imgClick here if you’re unable to view the photo gallery on your mobile device.It didn’t take long for A’s fans to start writing revisionist history on Wednesday.That’s what happens when your team’s starting pitcher in a winner-take-all playoff game goes two innings and allows four runs, effectively torpedoing any chance of victory and ending the team’s season.After something like that it’s easy to second-guess manager Bob Melvin — or more accurately, the A’s front-office, as one has to think …last_img read more

SA banks’ governance ‘sound’

first_img13 May 2003The Reserve Bank is happy about the “positive” report from an independent review on corporate governance of the five largest banking groups in the country – Absa, FirstRand Bank Holdings, Investec, Nedcor and Standard Bank.Reserve Bank Deputy Governor Gill Marcus said the review, released in Pretoria on Tuesday, found that the corporate governance of the banking groups was “sound and that no serious breaches existed”.“It’s a very positive report. It points out that our banking groups’ boards are healthy and have a level of independence required to fulfill their roles,” Marcus said.The review was conducted by JK Myburgh and commissioned by the Registrar of Banks, Christo Wiese, last year. The review’s terms of reference were to broadly evaluate the standard of corporate governance applied by the banks, with the premise that corporate governance is an essential element of a healthy risk-management process crucial to the banking business.In this regard, the review found the banks to be committed to adhering to and applying high standards of corporate governance.“Acting on the advice of specialists on corporate governance, the banks on their own initiative from time to time review their corporate governance to ensure compliance with accepted governance principles,” the report said.However, vigilance was still required to ensure continued compliance with standards of governance, which were constantly evolving in South Africa and internationally, Myburgh said.Wiese said it was encouraging to note that risk-management processes in the relevant banks had become more quantitative, which reflected not only enhanced ability to process data, but also the application of improved techniques for the measurement and management of risk.Myburgh’s report recommended, however, that banks should reduce the number of board members, as “smaller boards are more cohesive and work more effectively than large boards”.He recommended that boards should consist of no more than 16 members instead of the current norm of 24 or 25 members.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Ford secures Africa export contract

first_img8 May 2008Pretoria-based Ford Motor Company of Southern Africa (FMCSA) has secured an export contract to supply right- and left-hand-drive models of the popular Ford Ranger pickup truck to African markets.In a statement this week FMCSA said that it began exporting the right-hand-drive variants from April and will follow with exports of left-hand-drive vehicles from July onwards.The company expects to manufacture approximately 10 000 Rangers for export at its plant in Silverton, outside Pretoria, during the remainder of the year.This number will increase to 24 000 Rangers for export in 2009, and to approximately 40 000 Rangers by 2010, raising the company’s total export volume to 60 000 vehicles per year.“This is another important contract for Ford of Southern Africa, and clearly shows the confidence Ford Motor Company has in our world-class workforce and their ability to produce vehicles of international standards and quality,” said FMCSA chief executive Hal Feder.“It also further highlights our ongoing commitment to expanding our operations and export component in South Africa.”The contract would assist the company in preparing for the export programme of Ford’s next generation global compact pickup in 2011, by enhancing the plant’s manufacturing capabilities.FMCSA recently announced it would invest more than R 1.5-billion to expand operations for the production of the next-generation pickup truck and Puma diesel engine.Apart from the Silverton plant that assembles Ford, Mazda, Volvo and Land Rover vehicles, from passenger vehicles to commercial truck ranges, Ford also has an engine plant in Port Elizabeth, which is the company’s global producer of the 1.3-litre RoCam engine which it exports together with the 1.6-litre RoCam engine to Ford plants in India and Europe.The company also uses its Port Elizabeth plant to manufacture catalytic converters for export, with Ford pointing out that South Africa had become a centre of excellence in the field, with the city acting as a hub for the catalytic coverter industry.“This announcement further highlights South Africa’s capabilities in an increasingly competitive global market,” said Feder. “The automotive sector plays an important role in the South African economy and we will continue to develop our significance both locally and as a strategic export base for vehicles, engines and components for Ford Motor Company.”SAinfo reporter Would you like to use this article in your publicationor on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Local presence at global film event

first_imgBesides the screenings of documentaries, the IDFA also holds debate forums for industry experts. The festival is widely marketed throughout Amsterdam before and during its run. Workshops for aspiring filmmakers are presented by those who have been in the industry for a while. (Images: IDFA) MEDIA CONTACTS • Naomi Mokhele   National Film and Video Foundation   +27 11 483 0880 RELATED ARTICLES • SA film wins international award • Local flair for Sydney film fest • Cannes triumph for South African films • Big grant for African filmmakers • The best of African cinema onlineValencia TalaneAs many as 34 local filmmakers have made their way to the International Documentary Festival Amsterdam (IDFA) – with 22 documentaries in tow – to showcase locally made productions at the prestigious event.It is the largest South African industry delegation yet to take works to an international festival or market. Working with the support of the National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF), the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and the Documentary Filmmakers’ Association (DFA), the filmmakers will be able to network with producers and filmmakers from the Netherlands and around the world.The Devil’s Lair and The Dream of Sharahrazad, directed by Riaan Hendricks and Francois Verster respectively, are just two of the productions that will be screened. A post-production dinner will also be hosted by the South Africans, which will include performances by a DJ and pantsula dancers from African Cypher, a documentary that won accolades at the 2012 Durban International Film Festival.A 36-year-old ex-convict and gang leader from the Cape Flats is the subject of The Devil’s Lair. It follows him along his path of self-discovery, during which he confronts his violent past while at the same time tries to take care of his young family. His environment, the often violent Cape Flats, presents challenges for the man in his attempts to achieve a balance between the demands of his two roles.Worlds away, The Dream of Sharahrazad takes the viewer through the Arab Spring, as revolutions in several Arabic countries in 2011 have come to be known. It explores the changes in Egypt, Turkey and Lebanon, using the famous story collection, One Thousand and One Nights, or Arabian Nights.“We are very grateful to once again be part of this amazing platform,” said the NFVF’s chief executive, Zama Mkosi. “The IDFA provides us with yet another opportunity to take local projects to the world, which is one of our key objectives.”The IDFA is the biggest documentary film festival in the world, and every year it accepts documentaries from around the world for screening. To be chosen, the films need to meet certain criteria such as relevance of the topic, execution of the project and appeal to the audience.The DTI’s Export Marketing and Investment Assistance (EMIA) scheme works with filmmakers to help expose local productions to a wider market, as well as to assist their efforts to break into the international market. A member of the DFA board, Mayenzeke Baza, said initiatives like the EMIA were important for the growth, development and transformation of the industry in South Africa.They helped to expose emerging and previously disadvantaged filmmakers to different markets, he said, and opportunities to sell their products to international broadcasters and funders.“The documentary film genre is unique,” said Baza. “It stimulates public discourse, reflects on social, political, cultural and current events, explores history, commemorates heritage and unearths the mysteries of the universe and the planet.”The IDFA opens on 13 November and runs until 24 November. Slideshow image is of a scene from The Devil’s Lair, and is courtesy of Vimeolast_img read more

Strengthening the Family CORE

first_imgStrengthening the Family COREDate: September 1st, 8th, 15th and 22ndTime: 11:00 am-12:30 pm EasternLocation: Family Development Virtual Learning Event 2016Family Development is excited to announce the 2016 Virtual Learning Event (VLE) focusing on Strengthening the Family CORE.These sessions have been designed to equip military service providers with tools to join with families to continue their path of resilience. It is our hope that these sessions will enhance your knowledge, strengthen your skills as a service provider, and guide your work with these amazing families.Join us on September 1st at 11:00 am Eastern!We offer 1.5 National Association of Social Worker CE credits and CE credits for licensed Marriage and Family Therapists in the state of Georgia for each webinar, click here to learn more.MFLN FD Early Intervention will be providing Early Intervention Training Program (EITP) CE credits, click here to learn more.last_img read more

Gutter Editing and the Uninflected Shot

first_imgHere’s how to use the juxtaposition of uninflected shots and the gutter between them to make a compelling edit that keeps your viewers actively engaged in the storytelling process.Top Image: L’argent via France 3 CinémaWhat is ‘The Uninflected Shot’?In his famous 1988 book, On Directing Film, David Mamet points to the uninflected shot as the crucial building block of cinematic storytelling. An uninflected shot is the opposite of a tableau shot, and contains a minimum of visual information. A shot of a hand, a spoon, a key, and a face can all be classified as uninflected.The Usual Suspects via MGMWhen an uninflected image is paired with another uninflected image, the association elicits meaning in the mind of the viewer. Mamet considers this type of editing to be more effective than turning to a Steadicam shot or single take that merely follows characters and waits for something interesting to happen. Using the juxtaposition of uninflected shots is editing 101, but is so inextricably linked to the medium of film and video that it often gets taken for granted, and remembered only for its flashiest moments.2001: A Space Odyssey via MGMThis famous graphic match in Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey is a juxtaposition of uninflected shots. But the bone isn’t simply a bone. It’s just become an important tool, something we wouldn’t know without the shots and ideas that preceded it.Intellectual MontageModern Times via United ArtistsAny shot of a single thing can qualify as uninflected. However, the problem with uninflected shots is that they easily slip into inflection, which is to say that they carry more meaning than the most simplified and stripped down classification.Battleship Potemkin via MosfilmThis leads us to Sergei Eisenstein’s concept of intellectual montage, which works when the latent meaning in a shot is awakened through the collision with another shot. This shot collision is a conversation between images that gives rise to new meaning in the mind of the viewer.Intellectual montage can get pretty intense, especially when text gets thrown into the mix, as evidenced in the overwhelming assassin training video in the Parallax View (1974):Parallax View via ParamountThe Kuleshov EffectLev Kuleshov, Eisenstein’s teacher for a short period of time, was another early Russian filmmaker, theorist, and a crucial experimenter with the idea of uninflected shots. He conducted a well-known experiment known as the Kuleshov effect wherein he paired three sets of static, uninflected images. Each set included the face of a man, Ivan Mosjoukine, with a separate uninflected shot.Kuleshov Effect via Paul Van BuurenThe first pairing suggests hunger. The second suggests sadness. The third suggests lust. The decoding process and resulting association of the images is left to the viewer, who actively fills in “the gutter,” or space between the images, with meaning.Comic BooksScott McCloud explores this idea of “the gutter” in his book, Understanding Comics. While the book is primarily about comic and graphic art, there are many filmmaking correlations. McCloud discusses the use of “the gutter” as a way to actively involve the reader, and in the case of movies, the viewer.from Understanding Comics via Scott McCloudWhile the image of one man swinging an axe at another man is not the most uninflected image, it does function through an important omission. The juxtaposition with a second image containing a skyline and shriek compels an association on the part of the reader, who completes the act of killing merely suggested by the two images. The famous shower sequence from Psycho (1960) works by way of a similar principle.Psycho via ParamountUsing the gutter is about leaving out information and entrusting your audience to fill in the gap. It’s about visual restraint and building narratives through simplicity. After all, the narrative power of any material is only as good as its ability to elicit involvement on the part of your viewer.L’argent via France 3 CinémaConclusionBrevity and precision in shot selection and juxtaposition is like iceberg storytelling. Hemingway’s six-word story (even if it may be an urban legend) is an example of the literary power of the uninflected shot: “For Sale. Baby Shoes. Never Worn.” It’s deceptively simple and yet suggests something quite powerful by forcing the reader to fill in the gutter.As you plan out your next film or video, consider your own use of the uninflected shot. As you write your shot list and make your storyboards, consider if your shots can be simplified to elicit greater audience involvement through the power of intellectual montage.Can you be making better use of “the gutter” between shots to actively involve your audience? With single takes and “oners” on the rise, it’s easy to forget the effectiveness, and affectiveness, of a good old-fashioned cut. It doesn’t take a lot of time. It does take some planning, imagination, and a little bit of trust in your viewers.Psycho via ParamountWhat are your favorite examples of uninflected shots in film? Please share them in the comments below!last_img read more