More sports in brief

first_img Maxwell’s 96 guides Australia to series win MELBOURNE, Australia (AP): Glenn Maxwell scored 96 runs from 83 balls to guide Australia to a series-clinching three-wicket win over India yesterday in the third of five limited-overs internationals. Maxwell hit a six and a boundary at the start of the 49th over to tie the scores, but was out trying to hit a six to raise triple figures, leaving James Faulkner (20 not out) to hit the winning single with seven balls to spare. The win gave Australia a winning 3-0 lead in the five-match series following an opening five-wicket win in Perth and a seven-wicket in Brisbane. India, batting first for the third game in a row, posted 295-6, with Virat Kohli scoring 117 – his 24th ODI century – and sharing partnerships of 119 for the second wicket with Shikhar Dhawan (68) and 109 with Ajinkya Rahane (50). John Hastings led the Australian attack with 4-58 from 10 overs. Australia chased down 300-plus targets in Perth and Brisbane and were in a comfortable position chasing 296, with opener Shaun Marsh scoring 62 in partnerships of 48 with Aaron Finch (21) and 64 with Steve Smith (41) for the first two wickets. Sinclair fifth in Bermuda 10K HAMILTON, Bermuda (CMC): Jamaican Kenia Sinclair followed up her runner’s-up spot in Friday night’s elite women’s mile race with a creditable fifth-place finish in the women’s division of Saturday’s Bermuda Marathon Weekend 10-kilometre event held in wet and windy conditions. Sinclair, 35, was 14th overall in a time of 37 minutes and 42 seconds – around two minutes behind the British female winner, Faye Fullerton. The 31-year-old Fullerton was clocked in 35:48, ahead of compatriot Charlotte Arter in 35:48. Finishing third in 36:22 was Heather Kampf of the United States, who beat Sinclair into second place in the mile race. The overall 10K winner was Zambia’s Jordan Chipangama, who stormed to an emphatic victory over the undulating course – his fourth in Bermuda. Chipangama won the 10K event in 2014 and back-to-back half-marathon titles in 2013 and 2014. He also holds the half-marathon race record, which stands at one hour, 4:21 minutes, which he achieved in 2014. Coe: IAAF will probe bribery claims against Qatar LONDON (AP): IAAF President Sebastian Coe says claims of bribery by Qatar in the bidding process for the 2017 World Athletics Championship are being investigated. Ed Warner, chairman of UK Athletics, said yesterday his bid team was told “brown envelopes” were being handed to members of the IAAF Council the night before the vote in 2011 between London and Qatari capital Doha, which London won. Warner also said his team agreed to spend $7.2 million to cover prize money, having been warned they were unlikely to succeed if they did not. Speaking on BBC Radio alongside Warner, Coe said he was unaware of the claims and promised to look into them. Qatar has denied any wrongdoing in its bids for either the 2017 championship or the 2019 championship, which it will host.center_img NZ beat Pakistan by 10 wickets HAMILTON, New Zealand (AP): Martin Guptill made 87 and Kane Williamson 72 in an unbroken record partnership of 171 that steered New Zealand to a 10-wicket win over Pakistan in the second Twenty20 cricket international yesterday, levelling the three match series at 1-1. New Zealand took four leg byes from the fourth ball of the 18th over to win the match with eight balls to spare. In doing so, Guptill and Williamson passed the Twenty20 record partnership for all wickets against all nations that had been held for South Africa by Graeme Smith and Loots Bosman at 170. Pakistan seemed to have posted a sufficient total when they came in after batting on winning the toss with 168-7, just short of their winning tally in the opening match.last_img read more

Ghana’s world first in legal timber

first_img(Image: Wikipedia)New laws should be in place in Europe by the end of 2010 obliging timber importers to ensure the wood they buy has been legally produced – and Ghana will become the first exporting country to be able to offer such a guarantee.The timber trade is a huge business. In Cameroon, where timber exports rank second only to oil in value, it is worth more than US$700-million a year. Indonesia earns nearly $3-billion a year from wood and wood products, but Greenpeace says that as much of 80% of the logging in Indonesia is illegal.It is more than seven years since the European Union adopted a Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (Flegt, PDF, 1 MB) action plan. Negotiations have been grinding on ever since, both in Brussels, and between the EU and supplier countries. But last week an update meeting in London heard that a compromise text of the new legislation had been drafted and would probably be adopted by the end of the year.The key element is an obligation for importers to show “due diligence” – to prove that they have taken all reasonable care to ensure they are not buying illegal timber. What is or is not legal will be left to the producing countries; if the timber is produced according to local laws and regulations, the EU will accept it.And since the importers can hardly be expected to go and poke about in tropical forests themselves to see where their wood is coming from, the EU is negotiating VPAs – voluntary partnership agreements – with its traditional suppliers.Ghana was the first country to sign and ratify a VPA. By the beginning of next year it should be selling licensed timber under Flegt. Any importer who buys it will automatically be considered to have fulfilled the due diligence obligation.Pilots for the new Flegt assurance scheme have already started in Ghana, with inspectors out in the forest armed with tags and handheld GPS and barcode scanners.Patrick Newton, who is developing the necessary software for a company called Helveta, described how bar-coded tags would be put on standing trees, and more would go on the logs cut from those trees. Between the sawmill and the ship, consignments would be reconciled by volume and by species, and the system would then generate a Flegt-compliant export licence.“The buyer will be able to look all the way up the supply chain from the point of export,” Newton told the meeting, “all the way back up the chain to the forest where that timber came from.”Kingsley Bekoe, a forestry specialist with Ghanaian NGO Civic Response, stressed how important the agreement is to the country: “Almost 60% of our timber exports are to the EU market. If you don’t sign this agreement, I guess you will increasingly lose out.“The market is starting to ask for legal timber. It’s Europe and also the US but other markets are getting increasingly interested in this. So if you don’t enter that agreement you will gradually be losing your market share.”With Ghana, Cameroon and the Republic of Congo were in the first group to sign up. Negotiations are ongoing with Malawi, Indonesia, Liberia and the Central African Republic. Gabon, the DR Congo and Vietnam have asked to start the process.Each agreement will be different. Any VPA with Vietnam, for instance, will have to take into account the fact that it imports most of its timber and makes furniture to sell to the EU and Japan.“There’s no blueprint,” Matthieu Bousquet of the European Commission told the meeting. “No hard and fast rules, no absolute recipe.”Illegal logging fearsBut John Palmer of the Forest Management Trust was critical: “These agreements are now moving into states where the law is little understood,” he told the meeting.“And as you demand more and more documentation, you will get any kind of documentation you are prepared to pay for. It’s a simplistic assumption that everyone is basically working in the same direction. Illegal logging is hugely profitable; there’s a lot of money involved.”London-based campaign group Global Witness agrees. “This can curb illegal logging to a certain extent,” said its forestry expert, Reiner Tegtmeyer. “But only when the structures are in place to be sure that the certificates issued are not just paper. We have always said that independent monitoring is essential.”Illegal logging has been a source of funds for conflict and destabilisation, most notoriously during Liberia’s civil war. With Charles Taylor’s rebels in control of the densely wooded southeast of the country and the port of Buchanan, timber was one of their main sources of income.After Taylor became president, he continued to divert timber revenues for his own purposes – Global Witness believes that by 2000 around $100-million a year was unaccounted for. Because of fears that it was being used to fund conflicts elsewhere in the region, the UN imposed sanctions on the country’s timber exports.Those sanctions have now been lifted, but Liberia is struggling to re-establish its logging industry. Victoria Cole of the country’s Forest Development Authority says she is worried the Flegt process is being pushed ahead too fast, and that her country does not have the capacity to implement it.“If I show you a piece of wood,” she said, “and say this bit of wood is legal, then what makes it legal? People have to understand.”In Liberia, legality would mean that the concession had been awarded by competitive bidding, that the company treats its workers fairly and fulfils its obligation to the local community, that it only cuts mature trees and does not exceed its quota and that it has paid all its taxes.But she likes the fact that the EU will base its standard of legality on Liberia’s own laws. “We are the ones to determine it,” she says. “No one is going to determine it for us.”Source: Irin Newslast_img read more

Want Microsoft Office For Christmas? Sorry, Only Developers Likely To Get It

first_imgRelated Posts Microsoft said Thursday that its latest Office suite has been released to manufacturing, although consumers won’t find it under their Christmas tree.In fact, the timing of the Office release will be spread out over at least two months, which Microsoft said was necessary to allow various market segments to enjoy the best experience.Specifically, customers who purchase a Windows RT tablet Oct. 26 will receive a free preview version of Office, with only the core apps — Word, PowerPoint, Excel and the oft-overlooked OneNote.In mid-November, volume-licensing customers with Software Assurance will be able to download the Office 2013 applications as well as Office products including SharePoint 2013, Lync 2013 and Exchange 2013.That’s also when IT professionals and developers will be able to download the final version via TechNet or MSDN subscriptions, and when the new features will be available Office 365 subscribers.But consumers? Microsoft isn’t saying with any precision. A standalone download of Office will have to wait until the first quarter of 2013.Microsoft indicated the staggered rollout is deliberate.“Microsoft’s bringing their technologies to market through a wide variety of channels for organizations, IT pros, developers, and consumers and as on-premises products as well as cloud services available in retail, online and from partners,” a company representative said in an emailed statement. “The company is taking time to make sure that the experience customers get through each of these channels is excellent.”Still, the company has traditionally released its software early to developers via MSDN and TechNet; Microsoft released Windows 8 via MSDN and TechNet Aug. 15 — 69 days before the scheduled launch Oct. 25. Adding 69 days to Oct. 25 would put the Office launch on or about Jan. 2, just in time for the Consumer Electronics Show — except that Microsoft has said it won’t participate in CSE anymore.“This is the most ambitious release of Office we’ve ever done,” wrote Kirk Koenigsbauer, corporate vice president of the Office division, in a blog post. “It spans the full family of Office applications, servers and cloud services. The new Office has a fresh, touch friendly design that works beautifully on Windows 8 and unlocks modern scenarios in social, reading, note-taking, meetings and communications. We are proud to achieve this milestone and are eager to deliver this exciting release to our customers.”The Office VersionsMicrosoft will sell three versions of the traditional Office suite: Home & Student ($139.99), Home & Business ($219.99), and Professional ($399.99). The first two versions will be licensed forever for either one Mac or PC, except for the Professional version, which is PC-only.Office 365 will be sold in two versions: Home Premium ($99.99 per household per year) and Small Business Premium ($149.99 per person per year). Each household that buys Office 365 Home Premium can install it on some combination of five Macs and PCs. Small businesses pay by employee – that’s just under $300 per year for two, and up from there. (Check out our earlier post on exactly what each Office version offers for what price, as well as our advice on what version to buy.)Koenigsbauer said there are more launch details to come. In the meantime, consumers can continue to try out the consumer preview before the launch, whenever it is. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img Tags:#biz#Microsoft A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… markhachmanlast_img read more

Pumaren wants better decision-making from UE after 2nd loss

first_imgUE went just 1-of-4 in uncontested field goals while FEU was far better going 11-of-15.Passing was also a thorn on the Red Warriors’ game tallying just 19 assists as compared to FEU’s 26. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Phoenix trial begins for NBA players accused of assault NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ View comments Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Pumaren rued his team’s reliance on isolation plays instead of finding open shots and executing extra passes.“I was telling them to move the ball, don’t force shots, and I told them even after our game against NU [National University],” said Pumaren, whose team lost 86-69 against the Bulldogs in the opener.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games opening“It’s fine with me if you dribble and try to attack your man, go ahead, but if you’re just going to dribble the basketball and you know there are no stats in basketball that says ‘most number of dribbles.’”In their game against the Bulldogs, the Red Warriors went 4-of-8 on uncontested shots and that mark was worse against the Tamaraws. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAfter starting the season with two straight losses, University of the East head coach Derrick Pumaren wants a stronger mental game from his players.The Red Warriors dropped to 0-2 after losing to Far Eastern University, 90-83, in the UAAP Season 80 seniors’ basketball tournament at Smart Araneta Coliseum Wednesday.ADVERTISEMENT Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claimlast_img read more

New research finds hiring disabled Canadians could boost economic growth

first_imgTORONTO – New research suggests that failing to make accessibility for people with disabilities a higher priority for Canadian businesses would cost the country billions of dollars in lost economic growth.The findings from the Conference Board of Canada focused on people with physical disabilities, a population group comprising an estimated 2.9 million Canadians that’s expected to grow to 3.6 million by 2030.The Conference Board says consumer spending from that demographic currently contributes about 14 per cent to Canada’s Gross Domestic Product, but adds that figure could be much higher if people with disabilities faced fewer barriers to participating in the workforce.They say if businesses were to make a concerted effort to become more inclusive, both by making physical environments accessible and adjusting their attitudes towards the disabled, the economic impact for the country would be significant.The research estimates the number of people with physical disabilities in the workforce could climb by 15 per cent, which could add $16.8 billion to Canada’s GDP by 2030.Advocacy groups say governments and businesses should view the findings as a call to action, adding that bolstering the bottom line through greater inclusion will also address fundamental human rights.“Wake up, Canada,” said Rick Hansen, the paraplegic athlete and advocate whose eponymous foundation commissioned the Conference Board research. “This is an opportunity that we can’t afford to miss, and we need to do it now.”The Conference Board said it arrived at its findings by combining its own original research with the Statistics Canada survey on disability, last released in 2012.To supplement Statistics Canada’s work, the board had polling firm Leger survey 497 Canadians with disabilities in an online questionnaire conducted between Feb. 15 and 24, 2017. The polling industry’s professional body, the Marketing Research and Intelligence Association, says online surveys cannot be assigned a margin of error as they are not a random sample and therefore are not necessarily representative of the whole population. Leger is an accredited member of the association.The research said Canada’s physically disabled population is currently on track to grow at double the pace of the national average, highlighting the potential spending power of a group that’s chronically underemployed. Figures from various bodies including Statistics Canada consistently show that only about half of eligible people with disabilities are able to find work compared to roughly 80 per cent of able-bodied peers.The Conference Board said removing barriers to employment would not only tackle this problem, but increase the amount of money available to this rapidly growing demographic and give newly empowered consumers more places to spend it.Increasing accessibility in workplaces would benefit not only the people who work there but the people who patronize the businesses, Hansen said, adding the research figures would be even higher if people with neurodevelopmental or mental health disabilities were included in the tally.Matthew Stewart, study co-author and Conference Board director of economics, estimated that companies that step up their accessibility efforts could not only contribute to Canada’s prosperity, but address a persistent problem plaguing the business world.“We keep talking about labour shortages, how companies are having more and more difficulty finding qualified staff,” he said. “This is a group that is underemployed and can make a significant contribution to the economy.”That’s been the case for Sedexo Canada Ltd., a global food and facilities management company with 10,000 employees in Canada.Vice-president of corporate affairs Katherine Power said ever since the company committed to hiring and supporting more people with disabilities roughly eight years ago, they’ve seen concrete improvements such as lower turnover rates, client satisfaction and workplace safety. Sedexo is hoping to hire an additional 200 disabled employees this year, she said, adding that target will keep increasing for the foreseeable future.“I’d like to say we’re doing it out of the goodness of our hearts because it’s the right thing to do, and it is all those things, but that’s not what drives a private-sector company to make a decision like this,” she said. “We’re really doing it because it makes total sense from a business perspective and we see that in our results.”Stewart noted that businesses have historically balked at the perceived cost of upgrading physical premises or implementing staff training, but said the numbers indicate the financial benefits would ultimately outweigh those expenses in the end.Kyle Rawn, senior consultant with Accessibility Professionals of Ontario, agrees. As an adviser to businesses hoping to improve their accessibility, Rawn frequently encounters reluctance to shell out for upgrades.But not all solutions need to be expensive, said Rawn, who is totally blind.While retrofitting buildings with ramps and handrails can add up, he said other steps such as ensuring adequate lighting and removing obstacles from high-traffic areas can all contribute to a more inclusive environment.He said some businesses will resist the call to action, adding enforceable government legislation and accountability measures will be key to ensuring lasting change.For businesses that get on board, however, Rawn said they must also look beyond physical environments and ensure the people who work there understand what accessibility means.“You could have the most accessible buildings in the world, but yet if you have people who are working there providing goods and services who have poor attitudes or don’t realize what they need to do to be an inclusive business, then it’s kind of all for naught.”last_img read more