Wasteful England held by Croatia in Nations League stalemate

first_img BEST OF 6 REVEALED Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade 6 Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions 6 Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? England’s most successful clubs of the past decade, according to trophies won There was also a glimpse of the future as 18-year-old substitute Sancho became the first player born this millennium to play for the senior side, while 21-year-old Ben Chilwell impressed.The Leicester left-back provided a fine cross 12 minutes into his first England start and Raheem Sterling would have tucked it away was it not for Josip Pivaric’s intervention.There was precious little else of note in a largely drab half in Rijeka, where Croatia found the best way to stop England’s rapid attackers was scything them down. That approach earned Mateo Kovacic and Dejan Lovren bookings.Henderson’s own yellow card in the sixth minute rules him out of Monday’s trip to Seville, where England will face another top-level midfield. 6 RANKED Southgate will be buoyed heading there by the fact that Croatia did not get as much joy in that department as they did in Moscow.Ivan Perisic’s blocked effort was the best they managed in the first half until overlapping Pivaric fired over a cross to Andrej Kramaric, with the former Leicester striker’s mishit attempt stopped by Jordan Pickford.Southgate’s men failed to force a save in the first period but came close to the opener just before half-time as Dier met Henderson’s corner with a glancing header that hit the far post.Rashford tried his luck from distance and Perisic stung the palms of Pickford when play resumed, before England struck the woodwork again.Henderson swung in a free-kick from the right and Kane got away a header that beat goalkeeper Dominik Livakovic, only to come back off the crossbar. Henderson and defender John Stones are suspended for England’s next game This was the first of two big chances Rashford missed in the second-half The contest also saw highly-rated teenager Jadon Sancho make his England debut on a night where Gareth Southgate’s men were unlucky not to collect all three points.Just 93 days after the Three Lions lost to Zlatko Dalic’s men in the World Cup semi-finals, the countries met in surroundings that could scarcely have been more different to July’s huge encounter at the packed Luzhniki.The virtually-empty Stadion HNK Rijeka hosted England’s first-ever match behind closed doors as Croatia completed a ground ban imposed by UEFA for having a swastika on the pitch during a Euro 2016 qualifier against Italy.Eric Dier and Harry Kane also hit the woodwork as the opportunity for England to exact World Cup revenge went begging in the Group A4 encounter. Latest Football News MONEY center_img Forbes list reveals how much Mayweather, Ronaldo and Messi earned this decade Marcus Rashford spurned two good chances as England played out a goalless draw with Croatia in their UEFA Nations League match in Rijeka.The Manchester United striker scuffed a left-footed effort on 54 minutes before striking straight at Croatia keeper Dominik Livakovic moments later in a game that was played behind closed doors. ADVICE 6 Ronaldo warned Lukaku how hard scoring goals in Serie A would be before Inter move 6 Penalty claims were rejected as Ross Barkley, making his first England appearance in 868 days, went down in the box – and Stones’ frustration at that decision resulted in a foul that brought a booking and suspension.Southgate’s side were now in the ascendancy and Rashford should have put them ahead. Two minutes after failing to greet a fine Kyle Walker cross with the finish it deserved from close range, he was put through by Sterling but somehow failed to beat Livakovic.Tin Jedvaj was perhaps fortunate to only see yellow for a late challenge on Dier, but Croatia had now settled and Kramaric had a chance before Rebic curled just wide from 20 yards.Kane saw an effort ruled out for offside and seemingly broke the net in the process, leading to a pause in play that saw England fans get a wave from Pickford.History boy Sancho showed flashes of excitement after his 78th-minute introduction, with his threatening late cross causing problems in a match that ended goalless.NATIONS LEAGUE A4 TABLE Every shout, kick and challenge was audible in the match played out in front of a few hundred officials and journalists. You could even hear the beeping of an ambulance reversing behind one of the goals.There were regular, distant cries from a small group of hardy England fans that had found a vantage point high above one of the stands, but those efforts were rewarded with a poor first half in which Dier hit the post late on.England improved after the break as Kane hit the woodwork before Rashford missed two fine chances, while Ante Rebic curled just wide for a Croatia side that had lost their Nations League opener 6-0 in Spain.Southgate’s men face their own Spanish test on Monday without the suspended Jordan Henderson and John Stones, but there are certainly promising moments to build on. Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury Kane’s powerful second-half header rattled the bar with Livakovic beaten all ends up REVEALED Sancho, 18, becomes the first player born after the millennium to make his England debut Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won The England boss will be wondering how his side didn’t win the game huge blow silverware last_img read more

Butterflies Invented LEDs First

first_imgLight-emitting diodes (LEDs) were a prized invention of physicists, improved greatly in 2001, but now we find butterflies invented them first.  We already knew that butterfly wings achieve their shimmering iridescence by means of photonic crystals (01/29/2003), as do some birds (10/13/2003), but now it appears that the butterflies have even more exotic tricks up their sleeves: they have true LEDs.    Pete Vukusic of Exeter and Ian Hooper of MIT were startled to see the wings of African swallowtails shine super-bright under ultraviolet light.  They reported in Science this week that the photonic crystals absorb UV and re-radiate it in a blue-green portion of the visible spectrum where the butterfly’s eye is particularly sensitive.  Not only that, the photonic crystals are shaped in a cylindrical way to prevent side-scattering, are spaced for maximum effect, and contain reflective surfaces to focus the light straight out of the tubular shafts.  This makes them “all but identical in design to the LED,” said Vukusic.  Being able to emit powerful light without a semiconductor or power source makes the feat “doubly efficient in a way,” he said.  It’s not just an analogy calling this structure an LED, he explained – that is really how it works.  The researchers feel that their results will help engineers improve manmade devices.  “When you study these things and get a feel for the photonic architecture available, you really start to appreciate the elegance with which nature put some of these things together,” he said.  Sources: BBC News, MSNBC, LiveScience and News@Nature.There was little mention of evolution in any of the papers, except that the BBC article stated that the butterflies “had been using this method for 30 million years,” and News@Nature mentioned in passing that the system had “evolved to direct the emitted light outwards” without venturing to say how.  All the evolutionists seemed so amazed that a butterfly figured this out.  Even Ker Than, Mr. Dogmatic Darwinist and ID-Basher, didn’t dare speculate about how this precision optical system evolved.  To top that, Nature, that Darwinese foghorn, actually subtitled their piece, “Butterflies shine brighter by design.”  Cowabunga!  Are they beginning to see the light?    Think about the fact that a butterfly goes through an egg, caterpillar, and chrysalis stage.  In that last stage, all its guts are transformed into precision LEDs, flight software and hardware, vision, incredibly-sensitive olfactory systems and much, much more.    Kids should get out with their butterfly nets and learn some creation science like they always have.  Only now, they should learn some physics and optical electronics, too.  Sounds like some good Science Fair material here.(Visited 15 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

SA’s stock exchange lists

first_img6 June 2006South Africa’s only stock exchange, the JSE Ltd, listed on its own exchange on Monday morning.In a momentous occasion in the history of the exchange, guests were joined by Deputy President Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, and wore a variety of hats in memory of the closing day of the old trading floor nearly 10 years ago to the day.By 10.30am the JSE had traded in the same region of trades seen in heavyweight companies BHP Billiton and First Rand.The JSE now joins an elite number of international bourses – including the London and New York stock exchanges, Deutsche Borse, Nasdaq, Euronext, the Australian Stock Exchange, the Singapore Exchange and the Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing – that have listed on their own markets.For investors in South Africa and abroad, the move brings heightened transparency and visibility to the trading of JSE shares, which in turn has the potential to improve their liquidity and tradeability.The appearance of the JSE Ltd on the main board will allow international and local investors – including institutional and retail investors – the opportunity to compare the JSE as a listed company against its other listed peers.For brokers, many of whom have been members of the JSE for decades, the listing brings yet another counter onto their books to trade.“For the JSE, the listing brings with it an opportunity to both showcase itself to investors as a well-governed company as well as the opportunity to broaden our shareholder base through a broad-based black economic empowerment initiative that was integral to the listing,” said Russell Loubser, CEO of the newly listed exchange.The broad-based BEE initiative consists of two parts: a Black Shareholder Retention Scheme aimed at retaining existing black shareholders, and a JSE Empowerment Fund aimed at funding education for black people wanting to work in the financial services industry.The initiatives will raise the JSE’s direct black shareholding to over 10%.“This listing firmly entrenches the JSE’s commitment to transformation and allows us to lead by example in every aspect of corporate life, including black economic empowerment, as a critical consideration in the social landscape of South Africa today,” said JSE chairman Humphrey Borkum.“It has taken 10 years of hard work to get the JSE to a stage where it can proudly stand up and be counted amongst its peers as a listed company,” said Loubser. “But if you had to ask any of my team, they’d tell you without hesitation that it’s been worth the wait.”As a listed company, the JSE counter appears in the general financial-investment services sector under the alpha code JSE.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Model ‘green’ car in SA for World Cup

first_imgXavier van Stappen is inside his car. (Image: Bongani Nkosi) Xavier van Stappen’s rather unconventional model electrical car, which he designed and drove from Europe to Africa before the 2010 Fifa World Cup, is helping raise awareness about alternative forms of energy and environmentally harmful carbon emissions.The French Belgian, who designed the three-wheel prototype in his home country, crossed 25 countries in Europe and Africa to get to the host nation, South Africa, in time for kick-off on 11 June.He set off in Copenhagen, in Denmark, and drove for four months to reach Ghana, just days before the tournament began. He then promptly disassembled the vehicle and flew with it to South Africa.“We flew from Ghana to South Africa just to be on time for the World Cup,” Van Stappen said at a press briefing in Pretoria on 7 July.During his overland trip he crossed Belgium, The Netherlands, France, Spain, Morocco, Senegal, Burkina Faso and Mauritania, among others.Travel by road began again in Johannesburg when Van Stappen started his next leg of the journey – this time to Cape Town. The inventor has been travelling with Vincent Pierart, who’s been filming the expedition for a website.The two-seater vehicle, which Van Stappen always describes as a prototype, is essentially a modified tricycle that’s shaped like a bullet. It relies solely on solar energy to move and can reach speeds of 110km/hour. “But I never drive so fast,” he quipped.It has a 10-year lifespan and is recyclable, according to Van Stappen.Van Stappen’s 12 000km journey to South Africa, which he planned to coincide with the World Cup, is promoting the use of “green” technology to create energy and contributing to the global campaign against biodegradation.“Nowadays we have a problem with petrol. It’s expensive and it produces pollution,” he said.Using only the sun’s rays to power the vehicle means that it makes no carbon emissions at all. “We have to adopt new ways of producing energy,” Van Stappen said.He believes that all electrical cars should be three-wheelers, because this keeps them light. Today’s conventional cars “are over-equipped” and consume a lot of energy, he said. Making electrical cars with four wheels defeats the objective of lightness, he adds.Although the first electrical car was manufactured in 1899, the market remains small. Van Stappen believes mass production will boost the industry and create more options for buyers. “[Consumers] are ready to buy it in many countries … [they] have the power to buy whatever they want.“During my trip I’ve met many people who are interested in the project.”Promoting the technology in AfricaVan Stappen’s prototype has been exhibited in all 25 countries it passed through, and is currently on show at the Allandale Business Park in Midrand, Johannesburg.One of the vehicle’s overriding characteristics is its very basic chassis, which Van Stappen disjointed with students at a technical college in Dakar, Senegal, to demonstrate its simplicity. Because the design is so uncomplicated, the students were later able to rejoin the chassis themselves.“The aim [of the trip] is also to transfer the technology” to the Southern Hemisphere, Van Stappen said.His prototype has even made it onto a football pitch at one of the World Cup stadiums.‘Green’ car for SA soonDuring his stay here Van Stappen visited a private company in Cape Town, Optimal Energy, which is producing South Africa’s first electrical car, the Joule. He said he was impressed by what he saw.Production will begin in 2012, either at a plant in Coega or East London – both industrial areas in the Eastern Cape province . The company hopes to have the vehicle ready for sale by 2013.“It’s great that [South Africa] is a country that’s producing an electrical car for its local market,” Van Stappen said.The Joule will be a standard four-wheel, five-seater vehicle with a top speed of 135km/h. It will use rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, which are also recyclable.The South African model will be able to run on solar power as well, so one of the optional extras is to have solar panels installed on its rooftop.The first of its kind in the country, the Joule was designed by South African-born Keith Helfet, who’s had a successful career as chief stylist at Jaguar.When not driving or promoting his first three-wheel prototype, Van Stappen works on a second three-wheel car project, the I-CARE 333, which is also biodegradable. He’s hoping that, in time, it will be available on markets across the world.During his stay in South Africa the Belgian designer visited Volkswagen’s plant in the Eastern Cape, and is now is looking for deals to manufacture I-CARE 333 here.last_img read more

2011 Predictions: Klint Finley

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts klint finley Tags:#predictions#web A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Editor’s note: Every December the ReadWriteWeb team looks into the murky depths of the coming year and tries to predict the future. How did we do last year? Well, Facebook didn’t go public, Google Wave didn’t make a comeback, and Spotify didn’t make it to the U.S. But our forecasts for Google Chrome, cloud computing, Facebook and something we called the “iTablet” were spot on. What’s in store for 2011? All this week we’ll be posting our predictions. Let us know your prognostications in the comments.1. Predictive analytics will be applied to more business processes, regardless of whether it helps.Netuitive is applying predictive analytics to IT system monitoring. This is an ideal use for predictive analytics. But Theresa Doyon has written about how survival analysis can be applied to customer attrition and employee turn-over. We’ve also covered how one company is trying to use predictive analytics to match customers with customer service representatives with similar personalities. In some cases, companies may be able to put these sorts of analytics to good use. Other times, it will actually lead to worse decisions. None the less, analytics will be rapidly adopted in the coming year for many purposes regardless of the outcome.ReadWriteWeb’s 2011 Predictions:2011 Staff Predictions2011 Predictions: Klint Finley2011 Predictions: Curt Hopkins2011 Predictions: Sarah Perez2011 Predictions: Mike Melanson2. The U.S. will add new provisions to the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement to include leaked classified information. Alternately, new international agreements will surface that attempt curb leaking and punish leakers.3. Despite this and other measures taken by governments and corporations, leaking will continue. Governments and companies will continue to try to do better at keeping secrets and intimidating would-be whistle blowers rather than curbing the sorts of actions that make whistle blowers feel the need to leak documents in the first place. This will lead to far more leaks, despite crack downs. Completely above board organizations may still have disgruntled employees that leak sensitive information, but will have far less to worry about. I don’t mean to suggest that “if you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear” or any such nonsense. Many organizations have legitimate reasons for keeping information secret. But as long as organizations give employees reasons to become disillusioned, leaking will not only continue but increase. 4. Cybersecurity hype of 2011 will dwarf that of 2010. Emboldened by the likes of Anonymous, Jester and Gnosis we’ll see more aggressive “hacktivism” in 2011 from the left, right and non-Euclidean. Meanwhile, we’ll see more of the high-profile cyber-espionage started by Project Aurora and Stuxnet. The result will be far more hype than what we heard this year – which was a lot.5. We’ll see more CouchApp clients for popular web services. And CouchOne will do a better job of making these easy for non-technical users to adopt. If users and developers actually do start using them, we’ll have the foundation for a more resilient Web. The best case scenario is that an existing client like HootSuite, Seesmic or TweetDeck will integrate CouchDB, but I’m not sure how likely that is.6. Almost all the big social enterprise players will have some sort of “app store” offering. By the end of 2011, every social enterprise vendor will have a store like the one promised by Jive. The most successful will be the ones that make it easiest for both customers and developers to integrate apps deeply with the host platform’s offerings.7. Adobe will try to acquire Joyent. This year, Adobe announced that it will acquire the content management system vendor Day Software, which just happens to be one of the biggest contributors to the popular open source Apache web server. Joyent is the sponsor company of Node.js, a popular framework for building lightweight web servers and other server-side applications.It makes sense that Adobe would want to be close to Node.js, but the acquisition would be about more than just acquiring the flavor-of-week development framework. I’ve written about how Adobe is building its own stack. Both Node.js and Joyent’s core Infrastructure-as-a-Service business would fit into this strategy. Acquiring Joyent would put Adobe in the cloud computing game, which is something every big vendor wants to be in on. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Highlights from the North American Passive House Conference

first_imgDynamic modelingDr. Achilles Karagiozis of Owens Corning gave the closing keynote address and did so with his usual smart and funny flair. The first part of his talk was a response to Dr. Lstiburek’s keynote in Denver two years ago, where Lstiburek said that the first passive houses were igloos and that you’re probably doing something wrong if you need to use WUFI.Karagiozis, one of the developers of the WUFI software tool, responded by posing a scenario in which Lstiburek was stranded in Alaska after a helicopter crash and all he had to survive with was his laptop and WUFI. Karagiozis’s hilarious models killed Joe off two or three times before finally getting to an igloo design that worked.The real meat of Karagiozis’s talk came after the funny opening segment, when he began discussing the power of dynamic modeling compared to the static modeling usually done.When you use a tool like REM/Rate (the main home energy rating software) or PHPP (the spreadsheet modeling tool created by the German Passive House Institute), you get results for one particular set of conditions. You enter things like heating degree days and outdoor design temperatures and get numbers for how well the house performs… at those particular conditions. As the temperature and rainfall and cloudiness vary, however, from hour to hour and day to day, your model doesn’t tell you what’s happening unless you change the numbers and run it again.The German Passivhaus program relies on the static modeling of PHPP. PHIUS is still certifying projects using PHPP, but passive house consultants certified through PHIUS can choose to use WUFI Passive as an alternate modeling tool.OK, this is going deeper than I planned but you have to know something about modeling landscape to understand Karagiozis’s point. So, last year I took the WUFI 1-D class and learned a little about one-dimensional hygrothermal modeling. Briefly, it’s a way of modeling the heat and moisture flows through a building assembly. You put in the assembly details and the indoor and outdoor conditions, and then run it for whatever period of time you choose.WUFI Passive does the modeling for a whole building enclosure, assembly by assembly. It also incorporates the requirements of the Passivhaus standard so you know if the modeled home meets the requirements for certification. It’s a nice tool, and Karagiozis has great confidence in it. “I have not seen a more accurate simulation of indoor conditions than using WUFI Passive,” he said during his keynote. RELATED ARTICLES A Passivhaus Conference in Germany Joseph Lstiburek Surprises Passive House Conference AttendeesNew Passive Building Standards for North America New climate-specific standardsGraham Wright, PHIUS senior scientist, revealed the latest evolution of PHIUS’s new climate-specific standards in his talk on the first morning of the main conference. The first room he was scheduled in was way too small because this was where everyone wanted to be, so we moved back to the room where Bill Rose had recently finished giving the opening keynote presentation.Wright’s presentation (pdf) was composed of 80 slides that averaged probably more than 100 words per slide. As you might suspect, it was not a presentation to be digested and understood by the end of his 80 minutes unless, say, you’re on the PHIUS technical committee and helped do a lot of the background work. I’ve got a copy of the presentation and am slowly working my way towards a bit of a grasp of the ideas. Never having gone through the passive house training makes it more difficult. (Katrin Klingenberg gave an introduction to the standards changes a few months ago here on Green Building Advisor.)Let me try to give you a quick summary of some of the main points Wright made.Motivation: “We’re proceeding the way we are because, as experience has accumulated in different climate zones, the facts obliged us to.”Certification: Still performance based, still pass/fail.The three pillars. PHIUS is going to stick with the three main components of PH certification: airtightness, source energy, space conditioning.Airtightness: Changing from air changes per hour at 50 Pascals to cfm50/square foot of building enclosure area. The threshold will be ~0.05 cfm50/sf. (I love this change volume is the wrong metric to use here.)ERV/HRV rating protocol. Changing the “12% deduction” to other adjustments. (I have little knowledge of this one, so I can’t really say anything about it.)Source energy. Making some changes to how the calculations are done here. For more details, see the report when it’s released.Lighting and plug loads. Adjusting upward because PHPP model was too low. “Intolerable, must fix,” according to Wright’s slide.Economics. This was one of the main issues. 4.75 kBtu/sf/yr is supposed to be the economic optimum, but actual cost-effectiveness results were one of “the facts [that] obliged [PHIUS] to” look for alternatives. The variation of degree days and design temperatures through different climate zones is part of the problem here. Failure of “tunneling through the cost barrier” was another.That last point launched the tech committee’s efforts to find out what might be the best way to do this. Building Science Corporation, with funding from the DOE’s Building America program, has been helping with this work as they’ve looked at BEopt models of passive buildings in different climates.The goal of that work is to find the real optimum in cost-effectiveness. And then go beyond it. Wright’s reason for going beyond the optimum was, “Because that’s our schtick.” I’m not sure how much sense it makes to find the minimum and then go beyond it, but hey, that’s what the upcoming member comment period is for, I guess. As he pointed out in his summary, though, the goal here is “to avoid pushing people way out into diminishing returns.” Perhaps they’re following the 12-step program guideline here: Progress, not perfection.From my layperson’s vantage point, the direction they’re going with this is a good one. Martin Holladay, the Energy Nerd here at GBA, brilliantly exposed the problem with diminishing returns of Passivhaus levels of insulation with a little drawing he did a few years ago.The seven 2-inch thick sheets of under-slab insulation shown in Image #4 below will save a lot more energy when spread across seven houses than when put in one thick pile below one house. It’s not a perfect takedown, however, because those other six houses probably aren’t going to get that insulation anyway. If they do, the contrast is different.According to an update on Twitter by my friend Peter Troast, Dr. Wolfgang Feist responded to the idea of climate-specific passive house standards by saying that the physics is the same everywhere so having a single, uniform standard is fine. It’s certainly true that physics doesn’t change, but conditions change, needs change, and cost-effectiveness changes. If it were really so simple, why would ASHRAE and building codes put so much effort into developing climate zones? (Jim Meyers in Colorado made that point on Twitter yesterday, too.) Great peopleBefore I start telling you why the conference was so great, though, let me remind you that I’m on the board of directors for PHIUS. But don’t think that means I’m saying all this is great because I’m on the board. It’s actually the other way around. The 9th annual North American Passive House Conference happened two weeks ago in the San Francisco Bay Area of California. The Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS) has been holding this conference every year since 2006, and it just keeps getting better.I’ve been to the last three now, and it’s one of my favorite events of the year, right up there with Building Science Summer Camp (Dr. Joe Lstiburek’s conference) and Possum Drop (the New Year’s Eve party I go to each year in Georgia). This year’s conference seemed especially good because of the direction PHIUS is taking the passive house movement in North America.center_img During the preconference sessions, I got to spend some time with my friend Jeff Reilich from Chapel Hill, North Carolina. (I don’t know if I mentioned it here before, but he’s the one who once worked on a house with an 8,000 cfm range hood!) We even took off for a while one day and drove over to the ocean and the next day went up to San Rafael to see John Proctor. Not part of the NAPHC, I know, but still a nice part of the overall experience. Plus, Proctor even invited us up into his attic to see his secret lab (photo below). Every secret lab needs a nice oriental rug, you know!I think it was Jeff who said the folks at the NAPHC are the smartest and most dedicated building science folks he spends time with. During one of the sessions at last year’s conference, Joe Lstiburek leaned over to me and said, “I really like this club.”I’ve felt the same thing, and so did many others who attended this year or years past. The folks involved with this movement are doing amazing work. Great timesSo another edition of the North American Passive House Conference has come and gone. (Another conference this year, unfortunately, adopted the same name PHIUS has been using for nine years. I’m sure Martin Holladay will be writing about that one soon, since he was there.) A lot of the great building science minds were at the conference in California, and I got to go, too. It was nice catching up with old friends like Dan Perunko, Gavin Healy, and J. West (who gave a great Judas Priest karaoke performance!) and meeting a lot of new folks. It was also nice to see Bronwyn Barry of the North American Passive House Network there and meet her in real life for the first time.The venue was great! We were right across the water from the San Francisco airport, and I watched with amazement as planes took off and landed without hitting the seawall and skidding across the runway. I did see one Korean Air jet get to within 100 meters or so of the ground and then pull up and abort that attempt. Not sure what happened but they landed safely about 10 minutes later.There was much more to the conference than I’ve covered here, of course. Kat Klingenberg gave a broader overview in her blog recently. One thing she covered that I didn’t was Bill Rose’s opening keynote. He gave a sweeping review of how we got here and discussed activism, the Vietnam War, and even managed to work in a bit about abortion, making the point that we need to be able to discuss rationally things that aren’t easy to talk about. He also touched on one of my favorite topics, peak oil, and reminded me that I need to bring that back into my presentations.The PHIUS staff deserves a lot of praise for pulling this off because organizing and running a conference this big takes a lot of work. I appreciate the long hours, late nights, and early mornings they put in.I’d especially like to thank Kat Klingenberg. Without her, there might be a little bit of passive house activity in North America, but I doubt it would be anything like what we have. Now we’ve got two organizations, two conferences, a lot of activity, and some serious innovation happening. I don’t know all the details about what happened leading up to the split with PHI, but I do know that I’ve been thoroughly impressed with Kat. She understands the issues. She works hard. And she’s willing to admit when she’s made a mistake.The passive house movement is probably the most exciting area to work in the field of building science. When you push out to the edge to see just how far you can go — or should go — it’s possible to make progress that could hardly be imagined before.See you in Chicago next year! Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, energy consultant, RESNET-certified trainer, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. Check out his in-depth course, Mastering Building Science at Heatspring Learning Institute, and follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard.last_img read more

Neymar slams Barca bosses after PSG home debut

first_imgNATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul “I hope that things will improve for Barca and that they will become a team that can rival others.”However, former Tottenham flop Paulinho’s arrival has not been warmly received by Barca fanatical supporters at the Camp Nou.Over 80 percent of fans urged the club not to pay more than 20 million euros for Paulinho in a survey conducted by Barcelona sports daily Mundo Deportivo.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Despite securing the massive fee for Neymar, Barcelona are struggling to replace him before the transfer window closes.The club have had bids in excess of 100 million euros for Liverpool’s Philippe Coutinho and Dortmund’s Ousmane Dembele turned down.And the club have been criticised for splashing out 40 million euros ($47 million) for Brazil midfielder Paulinho, who has spent two years at Chinese Super League champions Guangzhou Evergrande.But Neymar said he could not comment on what the club were doing before the transfer window closes at the end of the month.“I cannot speak now I am in another team. I don’t know what’s going on there, but I see my old teammates sad, and it’s that which makes me sad because I have a lot of friends there,” he said.ADVERTISEMENT Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim “I want to speak the truth, I’m very sad with them,” said the Brazilian star who cost the Paris club a world record 222 million euros ($261 million) to prise from Barcelona.“I spent four years there and I was very happy. At the start, I was happy. I spent four beautiful years there and I parted happy. But with them (the club’s directors), no.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games opening“For me, they are not the people who should be there, for the direction of Barca,” said Neymar.“Barca deserve much better and the whole world knows it.” Paris Saint-Germain’s Brazilian forward Neymar applauses after winning the French L1 football match Paris Saint-Germain (PSG) vs Toulouse FC (TFC) at the Parc des Princes stadium in Paris on August 20, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / bertrand GUAYParis Saint-Germain’s world record signing Neymar launched a scathing attack on his former club’s directors, saying “Barca deserve much better”.The people in charge at the Catalan giants “are not the people who should be there, for the direction of Barca,” Neymar told reporters after scoring twice on his home debut as PSG thumped Toulouse 6-2 in Ligue 1 on Sunday.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Uichico rues Gilas’ bad shooting in tough outing vs Thailandcenter_img Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR LATEST STORIES Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more