NBA playoffs: How will Warriors adjust to playoff officiating?

first_imgKlay Thompson subscribes. You can too for just 11 cents a day for 11 months + receive a free Warriors Championship book. Sign me up!OAKLAND – As the Warriors strive to win another NBA championship, their success will not just hinge on the Splash Brothers’ making 3’s, Kevin Durant scoring in the post and Draymond Green shutting down his opponent.Can Warriors coach Steve Kerr resist spiking his clipboard? Can Curry abstain from hurling his mouthpiece? Can Durant, Green and DeMarcus Cousins …last_img read more

Chess moves are life moves: Zuma

first_img24 December 2010Quick thinking was the order of the day at the recent Moves for Life chess tournament in Nkandla, KwaZulu-Natal. Moves for Life patron Jacob Zuma was in attendance, squaring off against some formidable youngsters – and planning the next move in taking the game to even more South Africans.South African President Jacob Zuma, whose love for the game of strategy is well-known, had a trick or two to show the smart kids at Wednesday’s tournament.The participants came from all over KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng province. Among those in attendance were international master Watu Kobese and South African champion Kgaogelo Mosetle.Unlocking potentialMoves for Life met with Zuma at his house in Nkandla this week to plan their next move in taking the game that teaches logic and problem-solving skills to even more South African children.According to its website, Moves for Life helps to unlock people’s potential through exposure to the game of chess, with its unique features enabling an innovative, structured programme for chess education from the lowest grades up.“The basic analytical functions required to play chess are of the same nature as the brain functions required to tackle subjects such as maths and science,” says Moves for Life. “Chess training, at any level of competence, helps people to tackle logic-based problems like those found in maths and science.”Reaching out to more placesThe Moves for Life tournament is in its second year, and there are plans to make it even bigger.“The President wants us to reach out to more places, particularly where there are previously disadvantaged people,” tournament organiser Sandile Xulu told BuaNews. “Next year, we plan to move to other rural areas because people want us to, and the response has been great.”Moves for Life will also partner with KwaZulu Chess, co-founded by President Zuma, to roll out a chess programme for schools from February.Ten schools in KwaZulu-Natal, including schools in Nkandla and Richards Bay, will be among the first targeted. Xulu said they hoped to reach still more schools in the near future.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Gallery: a chance for global solutions at WEF

first_imgThe annual World Economic Forum is an opportunity for dialogue, debate and problem solving on a global level between political leaders, business experts, and civil society. Held in Davos, Switzerland, this year’s theme is “Mastering the Fourth Industrial Revolution”. When Nelson Mandela attended Davos in 1999, he spoke of fostering acceptance and democracy. (Image: WEF, Facebook)Compiled by Priya PitamberThe Swiss village of Davos is once again hosting the annual World Economic Forum (WEF). From 20 to 23 January, it is a platform for global political leaders, business and industry experts, academia and civil society to come together to discuss the world’s economy.Numerous things have been said about Africa and the state of the continent by its leaders and others. We look back on some of the more compelling statements from previous WEFs.Images sourced from: WEF, Facebooklast_img read more

Gallery: The untamed Northern Cape

first_imgIt’s the largest and hottest province in South Africa, taking up a full third of the country’s land area. But the Northern Cape is also wild and empty, mostly desert and semi-desert. Under 2% of South Africa’s people live there.The 60-metre Augrabies Falls on the Orange River. The original Khoikhoi inhabitants named the falls “Ankoerebis”, or “place of big noises”. Later Afrikaner settlers then derived the name “Augrabies”. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Mary AlexanderIt’s September. It’s spring in South Africa – and Tourism Month, celebrated this year with the theme “Tourism for All”.To inspire your next road trip we bring you nine galleries, one for each province, showcasing our country’s remarkable beauty and diversity.A thriving tourism industry means South Africa is closer to achieving its National Development Plan goals of skills development and creating decent employment through inclusive economic growth.The vast wilderness of the Nortern Cape holds weird lunar landscapes, exotic plants and animals, the Richtersveld World Heritage site and the Big Hole diamond mine, possibly the largest hand-dug excavation in the world.In early spring the barren Namaqualand sees a sudden, brief and brilliant bloom of flowers carpeting the landscape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Sister Januar outside the Catholic Cathedral in the Northern Cape town of Pella. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Arri Raats, a member of the Khomani San Bushmen, at Boesmansrus camp in the Kalahari. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Canoeing on the Orange River at sunset in Vioolsdrift, in the Richtersveld region of the Northern Cape. The Orange is the longest river in South Africa, rising in the Drakensberg mountains in Lesotho and flowing westwards to empty in the Atlantic Ocean. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Brilliantly coloured Augrabies flat lizards are endemic to the Northern Cape, and common on the granite walls of Augrabies Falls National Park. In summer they delight tourists with their acrobatic leaps to catch black flies swarming near the falls. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)A seal colony on the rocky shores of the Namaqua National Park. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Crafts for sale at a tourist market in Pofadder, Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Donkey cart drivers in Andriesvale in the Kalahari. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Arnie Braam in Klein Pella, Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Desert dunes in Witsand – “white sands” – Nature Reserve near Postmasburg in the Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)A farm in Vioolsdrift. Irrigation from the great Orange River and from groundwater allows farmers to produce crops in the desert. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Quiver trees – kokerboom in Afrikaans – in the Kalahari. San Bushman hunter-gatherers used the trees to make quivers for their arrows. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The Sutherland Observatory on a starry night. There is little light pollution in the remote Northern Cape, making the province ideal for major international astronomy initiatives such as the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) and the Square Kilometre Array, or SKA. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Meerkats in the desert of the Kalahari Red Dune Route in the Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)An old shipwreck rusts into the shore of the Namaqua National Park on the West Coast. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Inside the McGregor Museum, an important cultural and natural history research institute, in Kimberley, the capital of the Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Palm trees against the late afternoon sun in Klein Pella, on the banks of the Orange River. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The mountainous desert landscape of the Richtersveld. The region is the only arid biodiversity hotspot on earth, with an amazing variety of plant, bird and animal life. The Richtersveld Cultural and Botanical Landscape is a Unesco World Heritage site. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The Big Hole in Kimberley, the capital of the Northern Cape, is thought to be the largest hand-dug excavation in the world. Once an open-pit diamond mine, some three metric tons of diamonds were extracted from the hole – displacing 22-million tons of earth – between 1872 and 1914. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)A massive communal sociable weaver bird’s nest envelops an acacia tree in the Kgalakgadi Transfrontier Park in the north of the Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Steenbok amid indigenous desert vegetation in the Namaqua National Park. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The local maritime museum in the West Coast town of Port Nolloth. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)A dog sits with its driver as they make their way through Vioolsdrift in the Richtersveld. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)last_img read more

Saving South Africa’s wildlife

first_imgIn 1973 Clive Walker, James Clarke and Neville Anderson established the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT), dedicated to conserving endangered species and restoring the delicate balance in southern Africa’s ecosystems.The organisation has, since then, played a major role in conserving many of Africa’s unique species.Droughts, floods, poachers and predators make survival for Africa’s wild animals a difficult affair and a growing human population encroaching on their habitats is driving many species to near extinction“We as human beings rely heavily on biodiversity and healthy ecosystems and without them we jeopardise our own wellbeing,” says Nomonde Mxhalisa, communications manager for the Endangered Wildlife Trust.“People around the world can no longer ignore the fact that the environment in which we live underpins every single human need.”The EWT has worked to bring issues of conservation to the fore in terms of issues in the way of social and economic development.THE THREATDroughts, floods, poachers and predators make survival for Africa’s wild animals a difficult affair and a growing human population encroaching on their habitats is driving many species to near extinction.The quagga, which used to be a subspecies of the plains zebra or common zebra, once roamed the African landscape in large numbers. But the animal was hunted to extinction in the 1880s, when the last quagga died at the Amsterdam Zoo.Other indigenous African species such as the African wild dog and the black and white rhinoceros face the same fate. To preserve these animals, the EWT has created a number of programmes targeting threats such as poaching, deforestation, disease, traditional migration route interference, and mitigating the impact that human involvement is having on their habitats.The Riverine Rabbit or Vleihaas is South Africa’s second most endangered animal after the De Winton’s Golden Mole. Pictured above is a juvenile Riverine Rabbit. (image: Endangered Wildlife Trust)PROJECTSMost animals are suited to very limited environments; humans however can adapt environments to suit their needs, and with a growing human population needing food and other resources, natural areas are getting smaller and smaller. Animals that lose their habitats often can’t survive this encroachment and can eventually go extinct. Recognising that humans and animals need to share environments the EWT works on programmes to teach communities, like farmers, how to run their farms without driving the animals out.The Wildlife Conflict Mitigation Programme, involving the Livestock Guarding Dog Project aims to reduce this kind of human/animal conflict.“We often deal with a great deal of human/wildlife conflict particularly when it comes to our work with carnivores,” Mxhalisa explains.“We have solved these issues however by introducing mitigation measures such as the livestock guarding dogs that we encourage farmers to use to ward against their livestock being eaten by various carnivores.”The Livestock Guarding Dog Project encourages farmers to use guard dogs to drive predators away, instead of shooting the animals or poisoning them (images: Endangered Wildlife Trust)Livestock farmers need to protect their domestic animals; but these animals are easy prey for carnivores such as lions, leopards, hyenas, wildcats and the now endangered African wild dog and cheetah. The programme encourages farmers to use guard dogs to drive predators away, instead of shooting the animals or poisoning them.The Livestock Guarding Dog Project has, since it was taken over by the EWT in 2008, helped farmers reduce their annual losses from an average of R3.4-million, to about R150 000.“. . . The work we do is literally bringing amazing creatures back from the brink of extinction and that means we’ve bought more time for all people to enjoy these species and to continue to reap the benefits of living in ecosystems that are healthy and thriving,” says Mxhalisa.“Many of the EWT’s staff live and breathe care for the environment.“Many of us are idealists who want to make a difference, to leave a real and positive mark on the world. We believe the work is important and the results and successes we have keep us pushing forward.”Another project, the African Crane Conservation Programme, in partnership with the International Crane Foundation, helps to ensure the sustainability of wetland, grassland and Karoo ecosystems that crane species such as the Blue Crane, South Africa’s national bird, depend on.PLAY YOUR PART“You can make a difference to the environment simply by not littering, not wasting water or electricity, disposing of rubbish and oil correctly and spreading the word that you are forever linked to your environment and without it we will suffer,” says Mxhalisa.The EWT also regularly holds talks “about biodiversity and conservation at the Country Club Johannesburg and events that commemorate the various wildlife and biodiversity days that take place during the year”.Along with individual action, the EWT needs funds to manage and run its programmes; it accepts corporate sponsorships and private donations. Corporate sponsors can contact Debbie Thiart on debbiet@ewt.org.za or call her on +27 (0) 11 372 3600.For more information on the organisation’s programmes and lectures, or how to donate, visit its website or call +27 (0) 11 372 3600/1/2/3.last_img read more

President Zuma announces new Cabinet

first_imgMineral Resources – Ngoako Ramathlodi 26 May 2014 Cyril Ramaphosa was appointed Deputy President and Deputy Finance Minister Nhlanhla Nene was promoted to minister of finance in President Jacob Zuma’s new Cabinet, announced on Sunday following his inauguration for a second term as President on Saturday. Zuma said the new executive – which includes new appointments in the minerals, energy, police and telecommunications portfolios – had been picked in order to drive economic transformation and restore foreign investor confidence by “ensur[ing] implementation and the impact of the National Development Plan (NDP)”. Ngoako Ramathlodi is promoted from deputy minister of correctional services to minister of mineral resources; Tina Joemat-Peterssen, previously minister of agriculture, forestry and fisheries, takes over as minister of energy; former department of labour director-general Nkosinathi Nhleko takes over as minister of police; and Siyabonga Cwele moves from being minister of state security to being minister of telecommunications. In another big announcement of the evening, President Zuma said Deputy Finance Minister Nhlanhla Nene would be promoted to be the Finance Minister, replacing Minister Pravin Gordhan moves from the Treasury to head up the Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs portfolio. His successor, Nhlanhla Nene, is South Africa’s first black finance minister. Nene was the chairperson of Parliament’s portfolio committee on finance for a number of years before being appointed deputy minister of finance in 2008. His wealth of experience and track record is set to ensure continuity and maintain confidence in a portfolio that is key to the country’s economy.New and merged departments Besides appointing new personnel, Zuma also announced a number of changes and mergers to the departments in his executive. The Cabinet now includes a new Ministry for Telecommunications and Postal Services, Ministry of Water and Sanitation, and Ministry for Small Business Development. The National Planning Commission and the Ministry for Performance Monitoring and Evaluation has been combined into one Ministry in the Presidency in order to harmonise planning and monitoring. It will be headed by former justice minister, now minister in the Presidency, Jeff Radebe. A new Communications Ministry has also been established for overarching communication policy and strategy, information dissemination and publicity, and the branding of the country abroad, Zuma said, adding that improved marketing of the country would promote investment in the country. This department will include the Independent Communications Authority of SA (Icasa), the public broadcaster, the SABC, the Government Communication and Information System (GCIS), Brand South Africa, and the Media Development and Diversity Agency (MDDA). The Ministry of Women, Children and People with Disabilities has become the Ministry of Women, located in the Presidency, with functions related to the support of children and people with disabilities transferred to the Department of Social Development. And the Departments of Justice and Constitutional Development and Department of Correctional Services have been combined in the Department of Justice and Correctional Services.New Cabinet ministers: full list The ministers in President Zuma’s new Cabinet are as follows: Arts and Culture – Nathi Mthethwa Energy – Tina Joemat-Peterssen Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs – Pravin Gordhan Communications – Faith Muthambi Public Service and Administration – Collins Chabane Social Development – Bathabile Dlamini Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries – Senzeni Zokwana Environmental Affairs – Edna Molewa International Relations and Cooperation – Maite Nkoana-Mashabane Rural Development and Land Reform – Gugile Nkwinti Public Enterprises – Lyn Brown Minister of Women in the Presidency – Susan Shabangu Human Settlements – Lindiwe Sisulu Home Affairs – Malusi Gigaba Small Business Development – Lindiwe Zulu Defence and Military Veterans – Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula Minister in the Presidency – Jeff Radebecenter_img Public Works – Thulas Nxesi Sport and Recreation – Fikile Mbalula State Security – David Mahlobo Telecommunications and Postal Services – Siyabonga Cwele Police – Nkosinathi Nhleko Health – Aaron Motsoaledi Source: SAnews.gov.za Labour – Mildred Oliphant Economic Development – Ebrahim Patel Science and Technology – Naledi Pandor Justice and Correctional Services – Michael Masutha Tourism – Derek Hanekom Higher Education and Training – Bonginkosi “Blade” Nzimande Trade and Industry – Rob Davies Transport – Dipuo Peters Water and Sanitation – Nomvula Mokonyane Basic Education – Angie Motshekgalast_img read more

Flying Tutu sculpture fetches R850 000

first_img18 March 2015Contemporary South African art proved to be a big seller at a Strauss & Co auction held on Monday night in Cape Town.The sale achieved a total of R50-million with a value sell-through rate of over 84%, once again the highest in the current market, the auctioneer said in a statement.A popular work by Ed Young of Emeritus Archbishop Tutu swinging from a chandelier sold for R852 600, far exceeding pre-sale estimates of between R450 000 and R550 000.The sculpture depicts a flying Tutu, smiling as he holds on to a chandelier. The sculpture was commissioned in 2010 by the Institute for Democracy in SA (Idasa). The Arch was sold to a private buyer after Idasa closed in 2013.Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu jokes with artist Ed Young at the unveiling of “The Arch” at Idasa in 2010 (Image: Idasa/Flickr.com)  In a preview of the sale, Strauss & Co wrote on its website: “Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Mpilo Tutu, the first black Anglican archbishop of Cape Town, well known for his steadfast and unapologetic public voice, is also celebrated for his good humour. Upon seeing Ed Young’s super-realist sculpture depicting a likeness of him swinging from a chandelier, Tutu laughed and pulled a fist at the work’s creator. ‘I’ll send you bad dreams,’ he told Young.”The top-selling work was Schmerzensmann III, an extraordinary sculpture by Dutch artist Berlinde De Bruyckere that fetched R3 410 400. De Bruyckere was the solo artist in the Belgian Pavilion at the 55th Venice Biennale in 2013, curated by South African author JM Coetzee, Strauss & Co said.The work comprises “a pale, attenuated figure made from epoxy and wax and hung from the apex of an iron column sourced from a decommissioned 19th-century station. Conceived as a powerful reflection on humanity, it evokes images of war – particularly of World War I fought largely on Belgian soil – as much as of recent atrocities,” the auctioneers say on their website.A world record was reached for a Robert Hodgins work J’accuse, which sold for R2,5-million, more than double its pre-sale estimate. His Porn King sold for a little under R910 000.Vladimir Tretchikoff’s Zulu Maiden fetched almost R3,2-million, while William Kentridge’s Head sold for R1,48-million.JH Pierneef’s Wild Pear Trees, which had a pre-sale estimate of R600 000 to R900 000, sold for more than R2-million; and The Maluti Mountains, depicting the mountains around Ficksburg in the Free State, sold for over R1,8-million.His Storm Clouds and Trees, a charming landscape painted in 1928 using casein, a milk-based binding agent, sold for R704 816. A fast-drying material casein demands certainty, Strauss & Co says on its website: “Characterised by their notational brushstrokes and impressionistic use of colour, Pierneef’s casein works are a benchmark of his intuition and assuredness as a painter.”Stokerij (Paarl) and Cape Kitchen, two paintings by Pieter Hugo Naude, fetched over R204 000 and R341 000 respectively.A Sailing Barge on a Canal, a work by Maggie Laubser, one of South Africa’s most well known expressionists, sold for R250 096.“The auction proved that great art, well presented, will always achieve great results,” Strauss & Co said.The top 10 lots, according to Strauss & Co, were:Berlinde De Bruyckere; Schmerzensmann III R3 410 400Vladimir Griegorovich Tretchikoff; Zulu MaidenR3 183 040Wolf Kibel; Portrait of the Artist’s Son R2 955 680Robert Griffiths Hodgins; J’accuse R2 500 960Jacob Hendrik Pierneef; Wild Pear Trees R2 046 240Jacob Hendrik Pierneef; The Maluti Mountains R1 818 880Alexis Preller; Mapogga Wedding R1 477 840William Joseph Kentridge; Head R1 477 840Robert Griffiths Hodgins; The Porn King R909 440Ed Young; Arch R852 600SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

“The Enchanted Forest” GC2P52E GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – April 16, 2012

first_imgShare with your Friends:More Cache page photo montageThis cache page reads, “You Must Believe in Magic” and then casts a spell on geocachers. The Multi-Cache “The Enchanted Forest” (GC2P52E) weaves an elaborate fairy tale for geocachers to unravel on Terceira island. The island is located 1500 kilometers (950 miles) off the coast of Portugal. Victor from  Team Recanto hid the geocache in 2010, after his 6-year-old daughter sparked his imagination.He says, “The idea came to mind while visiting the park [where the cache is now placed] with my wife and my daughter. At the time my daughter… was talking about fairies and unicorns, and [said] that one of the larger trees reminded her of a magical tree. That tree is now the final stage for The Enchanted Forest.”While the idea may have been instant, building the caching experience took weeks. “[Creating the cache]… took 45 days, and 12 site visits. My daughter asked if I could make things move on the cache page, that is why we have the animated dragons.”Victor’s daughter with the handmade cache container located at the final coordinatesBeyond animated dragons on the cache page and photo montages with fairies and dragons, Victor also wrote the cache description in Portuguese and in English. The four stage Multi-Cache challenges geocachers to solve puzzles to discover a handmade cache container.On the cache huntA recent log reads, “WOW!!! totally worth the hike! Congratulations to Team Recanto for another magnificent cache. The amount of work that went in to this truly shows. Thank you for taking us on a grand adventure!”Victor has advice for geocachers hoping to create an engaging caching experience. He says, “Take your time, visit the Groundspeak forums, do several site visits, make sure the story and containers combine well with the location, attention to detail is very important.”Continue to explore some of the most engaging geocaches around the globe. Check out all the Geocaches of the Week on the Latitude 47 blog or view the Bookmark List on Geocaching.com.Detail of cache containerIf you’ d like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, send an email with your name, comments, the name of the geocache, and the GC code to pr@groundspeak.com. SharePrint RelatedBeyond Here, Lay Dragons (GCH52C) – GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – January 17, 2013January 16, 2013In “Community”…wo hab Ich den Cache denn nochmal hingelegt??? (GC1DZ17) – GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – December 27, 2012December 26, 2012In “Community”High energy! — Fission around the bend (GC1NGRD) — Geocache of the WeekMay 28, 2015In “Geocache of the Week”last_img read more

Are You Really Responsible for Your Increased Revenue?

first_img Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Now High water covers a lot of stumps. It’s not until the water recedes that the stumps are revealed to you.Right now, the economy is humming along rather nicely. Companies are generally doing well, growing, and spending money. Because your clients are doing well, you are doing well right along with them. You might have 12 percent or 15 percent growth this year, a fact that should make you happy. But a closer look might dampen your spirits a little.How much of your growth is really your client’s growth and not your own? What percentage of your increase is really the fact that some of your clients—and maybe even a subset of clients in a certain industry—are producing your performance improvement?“But wait,” you say. “These are clients we expected to grow. This is a good thing, Iannarino.” And I agree that it is a good thing. But how much of a good thing? If your goal was 12 percent growth and 8 percent of that growth comes from your existing clients, then the growth of new revenue is 4 percent. Maybe that’s what you expected, and maybe it isn’t. Would 4 percent be the right growth number for new revenue when the economy slows, or when your existing clients reduce their spending in the future?Do your increased sales really belong to your client’s growth? Is their growth covering up your lack of growth? Could it be hiding a problem that you will not recognize until sometime in the future when it is too late to do anything to change your results quickly enough?If you look at your sales results, would you be able to generate the 12 percent or 15 percent growth with the opportunities in your pipeline now? Would you risk going backward in an economy that was just average or slightly below average?Make hay while the sun is shining, but don’t pretend that good fortune isn’t responsible for some part of the success your experiencing.last_img read more