Special Tiara team wait on Tingle Creek appeal call

first_img The eight-year-old led the field for much of the two-mile journey in the Grade One contest and although he was headed by the Gary Moore-trained Sire De Grugy before the home turn, he rallied for pressure in the straight. Henry de Bromhead’s raider was still in with a chance of victory before being broadsided in mid-air by the eventual winner jumping the final fence and after a battle on the run-in, Sire De Grugy passed the post three-quarters of a length in front. De Bromhead confirmed on Sunday an appeal was being considered and that he believed the interference cost his charge victory. Rowley-Williams said on Monday afternoon: “Everything is still being considered. I believe we have seven days to decide, but we won’t leave it that long. We’ll make a decision by the end of the week. “I’m having discussions with my solicitor and we’re waiting for some data to come back. There won’t be a decision today.” Special Tiara’s owner Sally Rowley-Williams will wait until later in the week before deciding whether to appeal the result of Saturday’s Tingle Creek Chase at Sandown.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Gabriela Knutson and Miranda Ramirez end four-match losing streak against Louisville in 5-2 SU win

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Sprinting to the right corner of the court, Gabriela Knutson attempted a backhand over the shoulder volley shot to save the point. She hit the bottom of the net.Syracuse head coach Younes Limam jumped from his seated position and threw his hands up, directed toward No. 37 Knutson and Miranda Ramirez, who were down 0-2. A coach who rarely shows emotion toward his players during matches displayed a slight flash of fury in a desperate attempt at motivation.At the match’s next stoppage time, Limam pulled Knutson and Ramirez together and told them to keep their aggression up against Louisville’s No. 51 Abbie Pahz and Mariana Humberg. Limam told them they were playing the right way, it just wasn’t paying off early, Knutson said. After the 90-second exchange, Limam looked over to the opposing bench, changed his tone and said, “Great game, good job,” in the direction of the U of L players.“I wanted them to just hang in there,” Limam said, “If they stuck to the game plan, it would work out.”Knutson and Ramirez responded by taking six of the final seven games to end their four-match losing streak and help Syracuse (12-3, 4-3 Atlantic Coast) take the doubles point en route to a 5-2 win over Louisville (13-5, 3-4). The win marks the pair’s first doubles win since March 2 after starting the season with seven straight victories.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textBefore Sunday’s match, Limam said Knutson and Ramirez “needed to get more confident playing together” and work more as a team. After losing to four straight opponents currently ranked in the top 60, Knutson and Ramirez needed to change their ways against No. 48 Louisville’s top pairing.The match opened with shaky net play from both Knutson and Ramirez. Down 30-15 in the first game, Knutson and Ramirez missed back-to-back close volleys to drop serve.After splitting the next two games, Pahz and Humberg played two back defense on serves in an attempt to throw Knutson and Ramirez off. At 2-2, Pahz hit low forehands directed toward Ramirez. After sinking two straight shots into the net to go down 3-2, Ramirez found her groove near the net which opened the door for Knutson to break through.Knutson opened the sixth game with an easy volley winner after three consecutive off-balance shots high in the air which got the crowd into the match.Later in that game, Knutson had a chance to close the game, up 40-15, on a misfired ball from Humberg, but hit the net instead. Knutson threw her hands up and kicked the ricocheted ball into the net. Limam looked over toward her and motioned his hands up and down, attempting to calm her down.“You’re going to have ups and downs,” Limam said, “It’s tennis, but credit to the other team, they hung on awhile.”Despite the small moment of frustration from Knutson, the Orange won the next two games, and led 4-3. During a time of stoppage, Limam told the pair not to panic and sticking to the plan, he said, because U of L would try to throw them off.At the start of the eighth game of the match, Humberg attempted a drop serve, a move rarely used in college tennis, but Ramirez responded with a quick volley to the right corner of the court.“It was really strange,” Knutson said, “I kind of took it as a little bit of disrespect, but I’m just happy we could overcome (Pahz and Humberg’s tactics).”Leading up to match point at 5-3, Humberg motioned toward the umpire to lower the crowd noise in frustration. After a warning was issued to the crowd of nearly 50 people at Drumlins Country Club, U of L’s last-ditch effort ended when Ramirez swung a ball toward the back endline to close out the match, 6-3.Ramirez and Knutson won SU’s first doubles match of the day, and the Orange picked up the doubles point after it dropping it in two previous matches.“We did better than we did the last few matches,” Knutson said, “It’s not the best we can do, but I think we’re definitely on the right track.” Comments Published on March 25, 2018 at 4:08 pm Contact KJ: kjedelma@syr.edu | @KJEdelmanlast_img read more

Republic versus Northern Ireland behind closed doors.

first_imgThe Republic play Northern Ireland today in an unofficial friendly behind closed doors before facing England in a friendly on Sunday.O’Neill admits it’s been tough for some of his players to get back to training following the end of the club season.last_img

Political infighting slows water funds

first_imgIn the special session, Schwarzenegger is asking lawmakers to place another $10 billion in water bonds on the 2008 ballot. But that proposal has stalled in the Legislature as Democrats dispute the need to spend billions of dollars on additional dam and water storage projects. Schwarzenegger has recently offered to compromise by cutting about $1.5 billion from his original proposal for water storage, but Democrats have not responded. “California voters have approved more than $14 billion in bonds to address water and environmental issues in the last 10 years,” Schwarzenegger said. “Billions of dollars were directly aimed at projects designed to address the crisis in the Delta. “Yet the delta is in worse shape today than it was a decade ago. Throwing more money at the problem without addressing the fundamental issues to fix the delta will only allow the crisis to worsen.” Schwarzenegger said that with the risk of water rationing and rate increases on the horizon across the state, quick action is needed. But Perata said he is frustrated that the governor’s veto has stalled spending of previous bonds. “I was very upset and I still, to this moment, do not understand why you ask voters to give approval to spend money to protect their water system, which we did with Prop. 1E, and then when we want to appropriate the money, he vetoes the bill,” Perata said. harrison.sheppard@dailynews.com (916) 446-6723160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre “A lot of (Southern California water agencies) are very hopeful that Proposition 84 will result in money for local projects, but so far we’re still waiting for some of the legislation,” said Jeff Kightlinger, CEO of the Metropolitan Water District. “It’s been a little slow getting Prop. 84 dollars out the door.” By comparison, more than 40 percent of the transportation- bond dollars approved on the same November 2006 ballot have already been allocated. Last month, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger vetoed a bill by Senate president pro tempore Don Perata, D-Oakland, that would have directed spending $611 million from last year’s water bonds. In his veto, the governor said he wanted to wait until a more comprehensive solution to the state’s water crisis is crafted during the current special legislative session. While California voters approved $9.5 billion in bonds to improve the state’s water infrastructure last year, little of that money has been allocated despite a lengthy drought and growing strains on the system. Political infighting and bureaucratic red tape have slowed spending of the 2006 water bonds, even as state lawmakers and Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger consider asking voters for billions of dollars in additional water bonds on next year’s ballot. Only about 14 percent of the Proposition 1E water bond approved by voters last year – and about a third of the Proposition 84 water bond – have been committed to specific projects. And within Proposition 84, only about 9 percent of the funds dedicated specifically to water quality and supply projects – as opposed to flood control – have been committed. last_img read more