100 days: Joburg shows its 2010 spirit

first_img2 March 2010Johannesburg residents took a break from their busy schedules, donned their Bafana Bafana jerseys and kicked back with the rest of the country on Tuesday to celebrate the 100 days countdown to the 2010 Fifa World Cup.BuaNews spoke to some of the South Africans who gathered at the 100 days countdown celebration on Maude Street, Sandton, on Tuesday.Thami Makhaya, wearing his Bafana jersey and sporting a vuvuzela, spoke of the long road to 2010, beginning with the country winning the bid in 2004 to host the World Cup.“This World Cup will unite this country,” Makhaya said. “I think once people realise just how big this event is, they will look beyond the differences and unite as South Africans to show the world what we can offer as a nation.“We have travelled a long journey as a country, and this is an opportunity to take yet another step forward.”The Khan family of four, who where dressed up for the occasion, said they came to Maude Street to support their country.“It is important for us be part of this historic occasion … All of Africa is supporting South Africa,” said Suraya Khan. “The World Cup is already a success, because it has shown that Africa is capable.”2010 will undoubtedly go down in the history books as one of the country’s most memorable moments, she said.For Josef Mkhabinde, the World Cup is about the legacy it will leave behind. “It’s what Africa has been dreaming about … I approach the tournament with confidence. Our stadiums are ready, our transport and security plans have been fine-tuned.“I can assure you we will not disappoint,” Mkhabinde said, “because we are a loving nation.”The world will descend on South African shores on 11 June – more than six years after the country was chosen as hosts – to witness the world’s greatest sporting event being held on African soil for the first time.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

South Africa closes Home Affairs department

first_img25 November 2015From 27 November to 2 December people would not be able to submit identity document (ID) and passport applications, the Department of Home Affairs announced, as it would be installing upgrades to improve its services.The upgrades, on the Live Capture system, will take place at all 140 Home Affairs offices in South Africa. Upgrading the Live Capture system facilities should be seen in the context of the department’s drive to improve processes for Smart ID card and passport applications, it said.His department had already issued public notices to announce a system upgrade and the affected sites, Home Affairs director-general Mkhuseli Apleni told journalists in Pretoria on 20 November.“During the upgrade, the affected offices will not be able to receive applications using the Live Capture system. For our staff, especially supervisors, this means working overtime on Sunday, 29 November, for a successful upgrade and a speedy recovery to normal services as planned.”Full Home Affairs services will resume on 3 December.Apleni also called on all those who had already applied for their Smart ID cards and passports to collect them. Up to 95 825 Smart ID cards, 75 517 green bar-coded ID books and 51 946 passports have not been collected by the applicants.Source: South African Government News Agencylast_img read more

2018 Ohio State Fair Market Beef Show results

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Grand Champion Market Beef: Caden Jones, Allen Co. (Div. III Cross) Res. Grand Champion: Carver Gostomsky, Darke Co. (Div. III Res. Cross)Third: Elizabeth Heintz, Hardin Co. (Champ. Maine)Fourth: Brady Turnes, Perry Co. (Div. II)Fifth: Delaney Jones, Allen Co. (Champ. Chianina) Judge Brandon Callis, Oklahoma Class 1 AngusChamp: Carly Sanders, HighlandRes. Champ: Erica Snook, Noble Class 2 ChianinaCaroline Blay, PortageTaylor Poff, Geauga Class 3 ChianinaDelaney Jones, AllenKimberly Winner, Darke Champ: Delaney Jones, AllenRes. Champ: Kimberly Winner, Darke Class 4 HerefordAlexis Shaw, TuscarawasCaroline Vonderhaar, Preble Class 5 HerefordFranklin Kinney, LoganAdeline Kendle, Tuscarawas Champ. Hereford: Franklin Kinney, LoganRes. Champ Hereford: Alexis Shaw, Tuscarawas Class 6 Maine-AnjouElizabeth Heintz, HardinAustin Sorgen, Van Wert Class 7 Maine-AnjouColby Watson, ChampaignHarrison Blay, Portage Champ. Main-Anjou: Elizabeth Heintz, HardinRes. Champ Maine-Anjou: Colby Watson, Champaign Class 8 ShorthornChamp. Shorthorn: Kate Hornyak, GeaugaRes. Champ Shorthorn: Taylor Muhlenkamp, Mercer Class 9 Shorthorn PlusChamp: Kassidy Thompson, MiamiRes. Champ: Mallory Peter, Defiance Class 10 SimmentalChamp Simmental: Carter McCauley, GuernseyRes. Champ Simmental: Grant Belleville, Wood Class 11 AOBChamp. AOB: Alli Underwood, HardinRes. Champ AOB: Sydney Sanders, Highland Class 12 Market HeiferLincoln Winner, DarkeRufus Levi Tackett, Scioto Class 13 Market HeiferHanna Schroeder, PutnamBrice Phelps, Union Champ. Market Heifer: Hanna Schroeder, PutnamRes. Champ. Market Heifer: Lincoln Winner, Darke Crossbred Div. I Champ: Case Barton, HolmesDiv. II Res. Champ: Adam Thompson, Clinton Div. II Champ: Brady Turnes, PerryDiv. II Res. Champ: Carson Shafer, Preble Div. III Champ: Caden Jones, AllenDiv. III Res. Champ: Carver Gostomsky, Darke Div. IV Champ: Lori Millenbaugh, CrawfordDiv. IV Res. Champ: Oliver McGuire, Champaignlast_img read more

Lessons We Can Learn from the Ft. Myer Child Care Scandal

first_imgMilitary child care has been in the news recently, and not in a good way. In December*, the public learned of incidents of physical harm inflicted on toddlers by caregivers in a Child Development Center at Fort Myer in Virginia. Arrests of two toddler staff were made in September and a review was conducted of all personnel files at the Fort Meyer child care facilities. This review eventually resulted in the dismissal of additional staff members. When he learned of the situation in December, Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta responded by ordering a thorough investigation of hiring practices at all DoD CDCs and youth programs in the U.S. and overseas. While news reports of the hiring practices at Ft. Myer indicate that this is indeed a serious issue to address**, other things can be done to help prevent child maltreatment. Harsh treatment of young children is hardly limited to individuals with shady pasts. Anyone who has worked in a group setting with young children can attest to the stressful nature of dealing with children’s challenging behaviors, especially in a group setting.Although we don’t know the specific situations in which the mistreatment of the toddlers took place, often, caregivers may be responding to what they perceive as misbehavior of the children – defiance, disobedience, not paying attention, not following the “rules.” The fact that the incidents occurred in a toddler classroom isn’t surprising to me. Defiance is part of the developmental agenda of typical toddlers. But, even when caregivers know that fact, it can be frustrating to deal with.Let’s be honest – working with young children can be rewarding and fun but it’s also very hard at times. Even well-trained caregivers can feel anger or frustration at a child’s behavior. Being able to stop a gut-level (or more accurately, limbic-level), angry response and reactivate our rational brain to come up with a thoughtful response is HARD WORK! (There is a reason that “guidance and discipline” is always the most highly requested training topic.)Nevertheless, caregivers can respond to even the most frustrating child behavior with sensitive, positive guidance rather than angry, controlling physical or emotional power. Caregivers are more likely to respond in positive ways when:They have training in developmentally appropriate expectations for children’s behavior and effective guidance and discipline strategies;They have stronger “executive function”*** (i.e. brain processes that regulate thinking, behavior and emotion; for example, the ability to stop oneself from acting impulsively)They receive ongoing coaching and supportive supervision, especially when they are newly hired;They work in a program that actively implements written policies and procedures related to staff response to challenging child behaviors;Their classroom environment is relatively calm, structured, and engaging to children;And the program has a culture in which the stresses of dealing with difficult behavior is openly acknowledged and where staff are committed to supporting, and if necessary reporting, one another when frustration overrides better judgment.All of these can and should be addressed by programs in the aftermath of this very public failure. The fact that repeated abusive behaviors evidently occurred within the military child care system, recognized as a model of high quality care, tells me that ALL of us in the early care and education field need to do a better job of understanding how and when caregivers respond to children’s behavior in harmful ways. We need to do a better job of diligently and effectively ensuring that our vulnerable young charges are well cared for. And we need to address the issue at all levels – personally, with the people with whom we work, and in our profession as a whole.Responding well to challenging behavior is a difficult, complex aspect of caregiving that has no easy fixes. Bolstering the hiring procedures is a good first step to ensuring competent child care staff but it’s also the easiest. Ongoing training, monitoring and support of all staff is much harder. But it is our ethical responsibility as a profession to do the hard work of making sure that those to whom parents entrust their young children are able to do so.Note: the original post of this article was edited on January 23, 2012.* http://www.armytimes.com/news/2012/12/ap-army-myer-day-care-scandal-officials-say-31-fired-121912/**http://www.military.com/daily-news/2013/01/10/military-daycare-centers-hire-first-screen-later.html***Recent research with parents shows that mothers who used harsh responses to their children’s challenging behavior tended to have poor executive function.last_img read more

5 DIY Tips for Your Next Shoot

first_imgHere are a few other DIY posts from PremiumBeat worth checking out:10 Cheap Tripod Dolly Options to Try at HomeMake Your Own DIY LED Light BarDIY Camera Stabilizers and Rigs for Under $25 Here are 5 ways to boost the production value of your video shots on a DIY budget.Cover image via Film Riot.One of the most valuable online resources for filmmakers and video producers is Ryan Connolly’s YouTube channel and production juggernaut, Film Riot. Film Riot provides actionable content on filmmaking questions, techniques, and gear recommendations. One of their recent videos focuses on a few DIY tips they’ve released in the past that will help reduce your budget or give you more time to focus on your production.Let’s take a look at some of these DIY tips as well as where to find the equipment they call for.Low FogIf you’re shooting a horror film, or any type of science fiction story, creating mood and environment is key. This low-lying fog adds a layer of creepiness and a boosts the sense of production value on your set. As Connolly advises, when handling the dry ice, make sure you wear gloves and make sure you don’t touch the ice with your bare skin.What you need:Styrofoam coolerFog machineDry Ice Spray Paint LightsLet’s say you don’t have the resources or time to get a few gels before your next shoot. Not to worry. You can simply spray paint the lightbulb. You can even include these in the shot, as they are visually appealing. Make sure you purchase heat-resistant paint because the bulbs become extremely hot as the shoot goes on (we’ve all seen what they can do to gels).What you need:Heat-resistant paint Lens FlareCapturing an organic lens flare in camera is easier than it sounds, and this cost effective technique will get the job done without taking your shoot outside. With a little bit of tape on the top and bottom of your lens, you can get the flare effect you’ve always wanted, without distracting your audience.If you still want more control over the flare or need to add one during the post-production process, check out RocketStock’s anamorphic lens flare pack here.What you need:TapeFishing line Do you have DIY production tips? Let us know in the comments. Simulating a PartyOne of the most frustrating aspects of shooting a scene that requires a lot of extras is actually rounding up enough people to make the scene look convincing. Fortunately for you, there’s a simple solution to subtly deceive the audience that uses only a handful of people and a few crew members to create the appearance of a raging party. Use your telephoto lens or zoom in enough to close the background up around your subject. Voila. If you want a little added spice, have a crew member walk in front of the camera or behind your subject to add even more to the illusion.What you need:A longer lens Shower CurtainUsing a shower curtain as a diffuser is not just a household trick. Professional cinematographers like Shane Hurlbut have used it on big-budget film sets. Even if you don’t have shower curtain with you on set, a quick visit to nearest online grocery or supply store will set you up with a super cheap solution. This curtain will add a level of diffusion that will help with harsh sunlight or shadows.What you need:Shower curtainlast_img read more