Flyers to play in two exhibition games this weekend

first_imgThis weekend will provide hockey fans with their first glimpse this year of the Fort St. John Senior Flyers. The Flyers will be welcoming the Fort Nelson Yeti to the North Peace Arena with exhibition games to be played Saturday night and Sunday afternoon.The teams will be on the ice at 8:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday.After this weekend the Flyers will open the regular season on home ice October 24 against Manning at 8:30 p.m.- Advertisement –last_img

Bournemouth 2-1 QPR: Highlights of Rangers’ defeat against the Cherries

first_imgCharlie Austin returned to action but QPR missed another chance to put pressure on second-placed Burnley.See also:Austin returns but Rangers are beatenQPR must be ‘careful’ with Austin – HarryBournemouth v QPR player ratings Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

Will Darwinian Law Protect the Unfit?

first_imgFor the soccer moms, sports fans and teen girls with cell phones glued to their ears who think Darwinism is just an egghead scientific thing, a press release from Vanderbilt University connects evolutionary ideas to legal policies that could affect individual finances, private property rights, political correctness, social conventions, use of resources and public safety.    Scholars from Vanderbilt and Yale argue that understanding the biological foundation of human behavior (i.e., human evolution) is critical to improving laws, yet they seem a tinge apologetic about past abuses.  Owen Jones and Timothy Goldsmith, publishing in the March issue of the Columbia Law Review, deny that “acknowledging biological causes of behavior somehow denigrates human free will or minimizes the importance of social and cultural conditions,” the article states.  Jones and Goldsmith also assure readers that proper understanding of biological causes can prevent misunderstandings and fear in the public mind:“It may follow from demonstrably false dichotomies, such as ‘nature versus nurture,’ taking misleading hold in the public mind,” he [Jones] said.  “It may also follow from a variety of misunderstandings about how genes, environments and evolutionary processes interact with implications for behavior.  And it certainly has something to do with fears about what the political implications – for racism, sexism, genetic determinism and other evils – might be, based on the use or misuse of biological information.”   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)Apparently the authors refer to the old Social Darwinism that simply ranked people as fit or unfit.  The new “evolutionary analysis in law” (a term coined by Jones in 1995), however, seeks only “to help inform the fields of law, economics and other social sciences with the latest scientific findings about human behavior.”  In what areas might “the biology of thinking” (e.g., behavioral biology, neurology, cognitive psychology) inform the law?  The article gives these examples:Such an approach might enhance understanding why some penalties are more effective than others, how people make choices in areas such as environmental protection and retirement savings, and what the underlying causes of aggression are and how they help explain why young men are sometimes willing – even in the face of the severest penalties – to kill in reaction to threats to their status.How could this evolutionary biological analysis affect lawmaking?In the article, Jones and Goldsmith explore how an understanding of current behavioral biology research could improve the effectiveness of laws by – among other things – identifying behavior patterns that would be useful to understand when developing laws; revealing conflicts that exist between innate human behavior and public policy written to regulate that behavior; improving the cost-benefit analyses that are often used in developing laws; exposing unwarranted assumptions; assessing the effectiveness of legal strategies; and outlining deep patterns [i.e., biological patterns from evolutionary history] in the legal architecture.The Dean of Academic Affairs at Vanderbilt is pleased that this paper, published in a prestigious journal, “indicates that the field of law and behavioral biology has momentum in legal scholarship.”  Though it is a “small but growing field,” evolutionary law will probably get a boost from this paper, and will foster “greater synthesis of life science and social science perspectives.”  Owen Jones has joint appointments in Vanderbilt’s law school and biology departments.  He founded the Society for Evolutionary Analysis in Law in 1997. Be afraid – be very afraid – when the Darwin Party writes the law.  Why?  Because they are biological determinists, moral relativists and elitists.  They do not believe that morals or responsibility exist except as phantom artifacts of mutations and natural selection acting over millions of years.  Jones and Goldsmith spout enough placating words to sound harmless, as if they have the best of intentions to merely prevent social evils (please define evil in evolutionary terms) like racism and sexism.  They just want to help the law be more effective, right?  But look down the road if consistent Darwinian theory were to be applied to the very areas they listed:Effective penalties:  effective for whom?  The communists were experts in the development of “effective” penalties.  If the penal code becomes oriented for effectiveness instead of justice, be very, very afraid, because effectiveness becomes defined in terms of the goals of the ones in power, rather in terms of intrinsic right or wrong, justice, and mercy.  Such terms are undefined in the Darwin Dictionary.  Brainwashing and psychology can be very “effective.”  And what is a penalty, if not a deserved punishment for a sin?  It becomes a tool in the hands of a Pavlov, a force an elitist wields to elicit the response he wants from the human dog.  One of the scariest parts of the novel 1984 by George Orwell was when the inquisitor was able to get Winston, under torture, to lie about how many fingers he was holding up: and not just to lie, but to believe the lie.  Truth became whatever the powermonger wanted it to be.  By contrast, American law and English common law were built on the assumptions of natural rights from our Creator, and the existence of truth and absolute moral standards derived from the Judeo-Christian scriptures.Environmental protection:  It is undeniable that evolutionary biologists, who are 100% Democrats (see 12/02/2004 entry), tend to view man as the villain in the ecology.  People will get the shaft in evolutionary law if the Elite Oligarchy, based on input from the Darwin Party soothsayers, determines that a certain gnat needs protection.Retirement savings:  Here, the Darwinists view human vagaries between the desire for immediate gratification vs. long term planning as evolutionary artifacts of ape in our ancestry.  Since people are unwitting subjects of the evolutionary forces of the jungle, they cannot be expected to make sound choices on their own; they need the Elitists to help them.  And you thought that evolutionary theory had nothing to do with the current debate over Social Security.Causes of aggression:  Carl Sagan used to talk about human tendencies toward aggression and territoriality as stemming from the “reptilian” part of our brain, another throwback to Haeckel’s recapitulation theory (see 03/08/2005 entry).  Darwinists cannot fathom a concept such as righteous anger or an axis of evil because these moral judgments are disallowed from “biological thinking” by definition.  Aggression is just a biological observation with no moral overtones, no different than a dog barking or a lizard hissing when threatened.  Humans are incapable of having moral motivations for aggression or for resistance to aggression, because such categories do not exist.  What happens in this line of reasoning?  It’s all about power, not about right and wrong.  The Darwinian Soothsayers tell the Elitist Oligarchy how mysterious Charlie Forces can help them win in the international pecking order, and what drugs to give the aggressive inmate to calm him down so that he is easier to control.  Being in control – that is the new righteousness.  It separates the elitists from the pawns.Murder:  To a Darwinist, young men full of testosterone and ape in their brains are incapable of thinking rationally or make responsible choices.  So on the one hand, we cannot penalize them when they do what their biology makes them do (see 03/08/2005 entry again), and on the other hand, for the convenience of society, it might become necessary to sedate troublemakers to keep them compliant. Owen Jones looks like a gentleman in his suit and tie, a calm and erudite man of peace, but his ideas are deadly and fallacious: fallacious, because if he just looked in the mirror he would see biology so complex just in his eyes that defy evolutionary explanation; deadly, because it is the utter absence of moral categories that makes “Evolutionary Analysis in Law” a prospect more fearful than communist psychopolitics.  Such beliefs feed right into an elitist mindset.If Jones were right that we were just evolutionary products from an animal past, we would have to live with that eventuality and make the best of it.  But he isn’t right and he could not be right.  For proof he isn’t right, look at nearly five years of reporting from of the scientific literature right here in these pages – there is hardly any category of evidence, from fossils to genes, that does not challenge evolutionary theory at every level.  And he could not be right, because his arguments are self-refuting.  If mind and intellect are products of mutations acting on molecules, then truth and values have no ultimate validity.  It is therefore disingenuous for Jones to use words with moral connotations (like evil, false, misleading, misuse, improve, effective) or even to make truth claims about what exists.  He cannot escape the Judeo-Christian assumptions that we live in a rational universe, and that as souls possessing the divine image, we can make use of universal laws of logic to discuss issues on an intellectual and moral level.  Even evolutionists act as if truth matters and has eternal validity, external to our transient biology; otherwise, they could not even claim evolution is true.    Does a creation basis rule out all behavioral study and consideration of human biological influences when devising law?  Of course not; if God created man as an eternal soul inhabiting an animal-like body, coexisting with other animals in the same world, it is to be expected that we will share certain behavioral attributes with animals, such as fight vs. flight responses (notice how adrenaline kicks in), imitation, fear, mob psychology, authority and submission, sexual and food desires, and other behaviors influenced by hormones and other biological factors.  Evolutionary reductionism focuses on the biology but ignores the reality of the soul, which is able to make a man or woman subjugate the biological urges and contemplate truth, good, beauty, purpose and destiny.  Humans are unique among physical inhabitants of earth: we communicate in language, we think abstract thoughts, we exercise true altruism (see 03/16/2005 entry), we use logic, and we contemplate our place in the grand scheme of things.  These distinctively human activities are all mediated through and modulated by our bodily faculties.    Creation-based law can and should take biological influences under consideration; Solomon, for example, remarked that no one despises a thief who steals bread because he is hungry.  But only humans make laws, and most laws presuppose that the moral categories of right and wrong are self-existent, not biologically determined.  “We hold these truths to be self-evident,” the American founders wrote, “that all men are created equal, and that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”  And to the protection of these rights they pledged their biology, their retirement savings, and (something evolutionists cannot fathom) their sacred honor.Jones and Goldsmith would probably denounce, in the most vociferous terms, any association with Nazi and Stalinist ideologies or the nightmare scenarios of 1984.  But where is any essential difference in foundational concepts?  The worst mass murderers of the 20th century believed that the law needed to be informed not by absolute standards of right and wrong, but by evolutionary thinking.  These modern intellectuals, looking innocent in their academic gowns, might want to distance themselves from the atrocities committed under those regimes, but since the evolutionary assumptions are the same, they must be held accountable to what new horrors would follow from application of their misguided counsel.    The law needs evolution like a shopping mall needs a terrorist.  Before the bloodbaths of communism and Nazism stained the 20th century as the worst mass-murder period in history, Christian scholar J. Gresham Machen warned of the deadly fallout of bad ideas, and advised thinking men of their priorities: “What is today a matter of academic speculation begins tomorrow to move armies and pull down empires,” he said.  “In that second stage, it has gone too far to be combatted; the time to stop it was when it was still a matter of impassionate debate” (Christianity and Culture, 1912, italics added).To make an effective impassioned debate against evolutionary lawyers, one must be informed and skilled in strategic argumentation.  Sadly, many well-meaning creationists enter the fray naked and unarmed in both knowledge and tactics.  Evolutionists dismiss religious based arguments out of hand; such approaches put them into patronizing mode.  They need to be knocked off their paper ivory towers.  Challenge them, instead, with the scientific fallacies evolutionary theory and the logical fallacies of evolutionary philosophy: i.e., don’t let them make truth claims or give advice inconsistent with their own assumptions, or let them get away with borrowing Judeo-Christian values and terms.  Challenge also their attempts to exempt themselves from the consequences of their own worldview.  They are not allowed to act as intellectuals detached from the rest of the pawns of evolutionary forces.  Such tactics trip them up in their own nets, turn their bluffing arguments into hot air, and make them fall on their own sword.  Learn the art and science of intellectual engagement: master the Baloney Detector and keep up to date on the news right here.If you want to take part in the most impassioned debate of our time – if you want a cause worth fighting for – now, before the armies march, before the empires are pulled down, is the time for all good men to come to the aid of their worldview.  Let Creation-Evolution Headlines be part of your daily basic training, and help recruit others.(Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

South Africa’s rhino fight takes to the air

first_img29 November 2013 South African National Parks (SANParks) is to beef up its arsenal in the fight against rhino poaching with the deployment of a Gazelle military helicopter. The Gazelle was donated by the Ichikowitz Family Foundation and African aerospace and defence group Paramount, and forms part of an on-going capacity building partnership announced a year ago. A Seeker MKII Surveillance aeroplane, also donated by the foundation, has been operating in the Kruger National Park since December 2012. Speaking at the helicopter’s unveiling at Letaba in Limpopo province on Thursday, SANParks CEO David Mabunda thanked the Ichikowitz Family Foundation for their involvement, which has included the provision of fuel, pilots, specialised training and operational capacity. Ivor Ichikowitz, the chairman of the foundation and founder of the Paramount Group, said the Gazelle would give SANParks superior airpower in its fight against rhino poachers. The light attack helicopter has a maximum airspeed of 310 kilometres per hour and a range of 670 kilometres. “A critical part of this helicopter’s capabilities is its speed and the fact that the Gazelle has a night vision capable cockpit,” Ichikowitz said, adding “Part of our contribution is to the training of the pilots to be able to fly at night, thereby fundamentally taking the war directly to the poachers.”Kruger rhino census Mabunda, outlining the results of a census conducted a few months ago, said it was estimated that the Kruger National Park was home to between 8 400 and 9 600 white rhino. SANParks scientists conducted the census using a 40% block count survey method. The census took three weeks to complete in September, making use of three helicopters with a total of 220 flight hours. The bottom line, Mabunda said, was that despite escalating poaching, increased anti-poaching operations had ensured that there were relatively stable rhino numbers in the park since 2008. “We are certain that without intense anti-poaching operations, Kruger’s rhino population would have begun significantly declining by now.” Ichikowitz said that, with the Gazelle now part of SANParks’ anti-poaching operations, “we hope that the fight for the rhino will reach a tipping point in 2014”. He added that his foundation was assisting SANParks with further training of its game rangers in advanced bush tracking techniques, and together with Paramount would be providing SANParks with tracker dogs and related training in 2014. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Saving South Africa’s wildlife

first_imgIn 1973 Clive Walker, James Clarke and Neville Anderson established the Endangered Wildlife Trust (EWT), dedicated to conserving endangered species and restoring the delicate balance in southern Africa’s ecosystems.The organisation has, since then, played a major role in conserving many of Africa’s unique species.Droughts, floods, poachers and predators make survival for Africa’s wild animals a difficult affair and a growing human population encroaching on their habitats is driving many species to near extinction“We as human beings rely heavily on biodiversity and healthy ecosystems and without them we jeopardise our own wellbeing,” says Nomonde Mxhalisa, communications manager for the Endangered Wildlife Trust.“People around the world can no longer ignore the fact that the environment in which we live underpins every single human need.”The EWT has worked to bring issues of conservation to the fore in terms of issues in the way of social and economic development.THE THREATDroughts, floods, poachers and predators make survival for Africa’s wild animals a difficult affair and a growing human population encroaching on their habitats is driving many species to near extinction.The quagga, which used to be a subspecies of the plains zebra or common zebra, once roamed the African landscape in large numbers. But the animal was hunted to extinction in the 1880s, when the last quagga died at the Amsterdam Zoo.Other indigenous African species such as the African wild dog and the black and white rhinoceros face the same fate. To preserve these animals, the EWT has created a number of programmes targeting threats such as poaching, deforestation, disease, traditional migration route interference, and mitigating the impact that human involvement is having on their habitats.The Riverine Rabbit or Vleihaas is South Africa’s second most endangered animal after the De Winton’s Golden Mole. Pictured above is a juvenile Riverine Rabbit. (image: Endangered Wildlife Trust)PROJECTSMost animals are suited to very limited environments; humans however can adapt environments to suit their needs, and with a growing human population needing food and other resources, natural areas are getting smaller and smaller. Animals that lose their habitats often can’t survive this encroachment and can eventually go extinct. Recognising that humans and animals need to share environments the EWT works on programmes to teach communities, like farmers, how to run their farms without driving the animals out.The Wildlife Conflict Mitigation Programme, involving the Livestock Guarding Dog Project aims to reduce this kind of human/animal conflict.“We often deal with a great deal of human/wildlife conflict particularly when it comes to our work with carnivores,” Mxhalisa explains.“We have solved these issues however by introducing mitigation measures such as the livestock guarding dogs that we encourage farmers to use to ward against their livestock being eaten by various carnivores.”The Livestock Guarding Dog Project encourages farmers to use guard dogs to drive predators away, instead of shooting the animals or poisoning them (images: Endangered Wildlife Trust)Livestock farmers need to protect their domestic animals; but these animals are easy prey for carnivores such as lions, leopards, hyenas, wildcats and the now endangered African wild dog and cheetah. The programme encourages farmers to use guard dogs to drive predators away, instead of shooting the animals or poisoning them.The Livestock Guarding Dog Project has, since it was taken over by the EWT in 2008, helped farmers reduce their annual losses from an average of R3.4-million, to about R150 000.“. . . The work we do is literally bringing amazing creatures back from the brink of extinction and that means we’ve bought more time for all people to enjoy these species and to continue to reap the benefits of living in ecosystems that are healthy and thriving,” says Mxhalisa.“Many of the EWT’s staff live and breathe care for the environment.“Many of us are idealists who want to make a difference, to leave a real and positive mark on the world. We believe the work is important and the results and successes we have keep us pushing forward.”Another project, the African Crane Conservation Programme, in partnership with the International Crane Foundation, helps to ensure the sustainability of wetland, grassland and Karoo ecosystems that crane species such as the Blue Crane, South Africa’s national bird, depend on.PLAY YOUR PART“You can make a difference to the environment simply by not littering, not wasting water or electricity, disposing of rubbish and oil correctly and spreading the word that you are forever linked to your environment and without it we will suffer,” says Mxhalisa.The EWT also regularly holds talks “about biodiversity and conservation at the Country Club Johannesburg and events that commemorate the various wildlife and biodiversity days that take place during the year”.Along with individual action, the EWT needs funds to manage and run its programmes; it accepts corporate sponsorships and private donations. Corporate sponsors can contact Debbie Thiart on debbiet@ewt.org.za or call her on +27 (0) 11 372 3600.For more information on the organisation’s programmes and lectures, or how to donate, visit its website or call +27 (0) 11 372 3600/1/2/3.last_img read more

Press release: Memories of the Struggle: Australians Against Apartheid an exhibition by ASAA

first_imgA multimedia exhibition that launches this week is to showcase a photographic timeline of events that weaves together a narrative of Australia’s involvement in the fight against apartheid.Premier of Gauteng Province, Mr David Makhura, is one of the people to officially open the multimedia exhibition. (Image: GCIS)Johannesburg, Monday 30 October 2017 – The Australasian South African Alliance (ASAA), in partnership with the Australian High Commission in South Africa, Brand South Africa and Constitution Hill, will launch an exhibition titled – Memories of the Struggle: Australians Against Apartheid, in Johannesburg on Thursday, 02 November 2017 at Constitution Hill at 18h30.This multimedia exhibition, to be officially opened by the Premier of Gauteng Province, Mr David Makhura and the Australian High Commissioner to South Africa, His Excellency, Mr Adam McCarthy, is a photographic timeline of events that weaves together a narrative of Australia’s involvement in the fight against apartheid.It will share insights into the Australian contribution to the collapse of apartheid, such as the ‘Stop the Tours’ movement which served to sever cricket and rugby relations with Apartheid South Africa. Such activism did not occur without political controversy or conflicts as related throughout the various sections of the exhibition.Several former activists such as• Anthony Abrahams, one of the Wallabies who campaigned against the 1971 rugby tour• Meredith Burgmann and Verity Burgmann who famously stopped the game in Sydney (where Meredith was given a two-month jail sentence)• Ken Davis and Frances Letters, who were both arrested during sporting tour protests• Jane Singleton, former Chair of the Australian National ANC Support Committee will be present at the launch and will be joined by a number of South African expats – Natalie Hendricks, Sybil Wakefield, Ish Larney, Pat Wagner – active then under the umbrella of the AAAM as well as currently under that of ASAA. Fellow compatriot, Angus Leendertz, an UCT alumnus, now resident in Sydney, is the curator of this innovative ‘step back into history and personal memories’.“Brand South Africa is honoured to be partnering with the ASAA in the execution of the exhibition, especially at such a historical place such as Constitution Hill, which symbolises South Africa’s journey to democracy”, said Brand South Africa’s CEO Dr Kingsley Makhubela.“We are indeed proud to be welcoming the exhibition within the Constitution Hill precinct which indeed serves as an effective custodian and proponent of Constitutionalism, Human Rights and Democracy in South Africa. It is a living museum where the past, present and future collide in a unique paradox that celebrates the victory of our present day democracy. A visit here leaves you forever changed with the unrelenting resolve ‘never again must one human being treat another human being in this manner, said ConHill CEO Ms Dawn Robertson.The exhibition, though focused on Australia, surfaces a largely unknown ‘history’ and narrative among the local general public of the significant roles played by social justice activists around the globe in support of the anti-apartheid struggle whether through blockades of armaments factories by workers in the UK; the vigorous divestment campaigns on campuses throughout the USA; the ‘End Bank Loans’ and ‘Boycott Outspan Oranges’ campaigns across most of Western Europe, the UK and Japan!“This celebration of activism fits so well with the current (social justice) campaigns that prove you CAN make a difference. Principled and gutsy Australians helped make a difference to the lives of hundreds of thousands of South Africans”, said former Chair of the Australian National ANC Support Committee, Ms Jane Singleton.“I hope that visitors to the exhibition leave with the knowledge that Australia was, and remains today, a friend and supporter of a free and democratic South Africa”, said Australian High Commissioner, His Excellency Mr Adam McCarthy.Media is invited as follows:High-res pictures are available on request.Date: Thursday, 02 November 2017Time: 17:00 for pre-interviews18:30 Official OpeningVenue: The Constitution Hill,11 Kotze Road, JohannesburgRSVP and for more information or to set up interviews, please see contacts below:RSVPS/Enquiries: Ntombi NtanziTel: +27 11 712 5061Mobile: +27 (0) 81 704 1488Email: ntombin@brandsouthafrica.comNotes to the EditorAbout the ExhibitionMemories of the Struggle – Australians Against ApartheidAbout Brand South AfricaBrand South Africa is the official marketing agency of South Africa, with a mandate to build the country’s brand reputation, in order to improve its global competitiveness. Its aim is also to build pride and patriotism among South Africans, in order to contribute to social cohesion and nation brand ambassadorship.Join the conversation at:Follow Brand South AfricaOn Twitter: @Brand_SAOn the Official Brand South Africa Facebook account.Tell us how you Play Your Part:On Twitter: @PlayYourPartSA or via the website.last_img read more

Archive Your Project With the Premiere Pro Project Manager

first_imgLearn how to archive and share your projects with the helpful Adobe Premiere Pro Project Manager.You can do a lot with Adobe Premiere’s Project Manager. You can easily collect and copy all of your assets to pass off to a client or a fellow editor, or consolidate one of your projects to save space on a full hard drive. Whatever the situation, the Project Manager is a helpful tool. Let’s take a closer look at the various features of the Premiere Pro Project Manager by going step by step through the process of saving a project to share with another editor. Step 1: Choose Your Sequence(s)You can find the Project Manager at the bottom of the File menu. First, at the top of the Project Manager dialog box you’ll notice the Sequences area, where you can specify individual sequences you would like to include in your archive.Let’s say we’re archiving this project for another editor, and they only want to work on our Timelapse sequence, which consists of one video and one audio clip. Simply select the Timelapse sequence and deselect all others.Step 2: Select How to Manage the Resulting ProjectYou have two options under the resulting project section — you can Collect Files and Copy to a New Location, or you can Consolidate and Transcode. I want to hand off all of the assets in their original format, so I’ll select the Collect Files and Copy to a New Location option.With Consolidate and Transcode, you can choose to actually render out your original content to a new format. You can transcode Sequences or Individual Clips, and you have a variety of different format and preset options available to you when going this route. But again, we’ll stick with the Collect Files and Copy to a New Location option.Step 3: Customize Your OptionsThe Project Manager offers you a number of options when archiving your projects.Exclude Unused Clips: Use this feature when you only want to include the media used in your selected sequences.Include Handles: When utilizing the Consolidate and Transcode option, you can choose to include frame handles on each clip which will provide room to add transitions or retime clips.Include Audio Conform Files: You can choose to include audio conform files or just re-conform them later on.Convert Image Sequences to Clips: A nice feature, the Project Manager can instantly convert image sequences to clips.Include Preview Files: You can choose to include preview files, or re-render them from your archived project.Rename Media Files to Match Clip Names: If you’ve spent time renaming clips in your project, it’s nice to be able to change the name for your archived project.Convert After Effects Compositions to Clips: If you choose to Consolidate and Transcode, you can have the Project Manager convert After Effects comps to clips.Preserve Alpha: Another feature available with the Consolidate and Transcode method, preserving alpha is important if you’re passing a project on to another editor or if you’d like to make changes in the future.Step 4: Destination Path and Disk SpaceOur final step includes selecting a location for our archived project. After you select a destination, the Project Manager will show you the disk space available. You can click on Calculate to find out the estimated size of your archived project, as well as the size of the original project.After you’ve finished the archive, open up your Premiere Pro project file in the archive and take a look. Make sure you have everything you need before you hand anything off or go deleting original projects.I hope you enjoyed the tutorial, and be sure to check out PremiumBeat for high-quality royalty free music and sound effects for all of your media and video projects.Got any helpful Premiere Pro workflow tips? Please share them in the comments below!last_img read more

Are You Really Responsible for Your Increased Revenue?

first_img Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Now High water covers a lot of stumps. It’s not until the water recedes that the stumps are revealed to you.Right now, the economy is humming along rather nicely. Companies are generally doing well, growing, and spending money. Because your clients are doing well, you are doing well right along with them. You might have 12 percent or 15 percent growth this year, a fact that should make you happy. But a closer look might dampen your spirits a little.How much of your growth is really your client’s growth and not your own? What percentage of your increase is really the fact that some of your clients—and maybe even a subset of clients in a certain industry—are producing your performance improvement?“But wait,” you say. “These are clients we expected to grow. This is a good thing, Iannarino.” And I agree that it is a good thing. But how much of a good thing? If your goal was 12 percent growth and 8 percent of that growth comes from your existing clients, then the growth of new revenue is 4 percent. Maybe that’s what you expected, and maybe it isn’t. Would 4 percent be the right growth number for new revenue when the economy slows, or when your existing clients reduce their spending in the future?Do your increased sales really belong to your client’s growth? Is their growth covering up your lack of growth? Could it be hiding a problem that you will not recognize until sometime in the future when it is too late to do anything to change your results quickly enough?If you look at your sales results, would you be able to generate the 12 percent or 15 percent growth with the opportunities in your pipeline now? Would you risk going backward in an economy that was just average or slightly below average?Make hay while the sun is shining, but don’t pretend that good fortune isn’t responsible for some part of the success your experiencing.last_img read more

Wozniacki into second French Open quarterfinal

first_imgLacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ “Svetlana’s a great player, especially on clay so I knew it wouldn’t be easy,” said the 26-year-old after her eighth win in 14 meetings against the Russian.Sunday’s clash was their first on clay.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“I played a great first set but I still knew I had to stay cool and aggressive.” Denmark’s Caroline Wozniacki returns the ball to Russia’s Svetlana Kuznetsova during their tennis match at the Roland Garros 2017 French Open on June 4, 2017 in Paris. / AFP PHOTO / CHRISTOPHE SIMONCaroline Wozniacki reached the French Open quarterfinals for the first time in seven years on Sunday with a 6-1, 4-6, 6-2 win over 2009 champion Svetlana Kuznetsova.Danish 11th seed Wozniacki, who made her only other last-eight appearance in Paris in 2010, faces either Australia’s Samantha Stosur or Jelena Ostapenko of Latvia for a semifinal place.ADVERTISEMENT La Salle fights off gutsy UE for 4th win Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View comments Pagasa: Storm intensifies as it nears PAR MOST READ Every 18 seconds someone is diagnosed with HIV Palace: Duterte to hear out security execs on alleged China control of NGCP BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast Cayetano dares Lacson, Drilon to take lie-detector test: Wala akong kinita sa SEA Games LATEST STORIES BSP survey: PH banks see bright horizon amid dark global recession clouds Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games BREAKING: Cop killed, 11 hurt in Misamis Oriental grenade blast Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more