Woods wins in Miami

first_img The American finished on 19 under par, after a final round 71, to claim his 76th PGA Tour victory and his 17th World Golf Championship title. He finished two shots clear of Steve Stricker, while Graeme McDowell, Phil Mickelson, Adam Scott and Sergio Garcia finished on 14 under. The final round saw a welcome return to form for world number one Rory McIlroy who finished eighth after a final round 65. McIlroy was on fire and flew up the leaderboard. The Northern Irishman began perfectly after an eagle on the first followed by birdies at five, 10, 11, 16 and 17. McIlroy will make just one more start before the Masters in April, but after a solid end to the tournament he was in no mood to alter his preparation. Woods will go in to the first major of the year full of confidence after he won the event for a seventh time. The 37-year-old was firmly focused on winning in Miami. An impressive 19 footer on the second seemed to kickstart his round, and although an accurate approach on the third left him with a good shot at another birdie, his putt ended up just to the left of the hole. However, at the next he made no mistake with the putter for his 26th birdie of the week. A wayward shot on the eighth saw him in woodland before another recovery led to par. A birdie at 10 extended Woods’ lead to six, while a two-putt at 12 made little difference to the outcome. After finding the sand at 16 Woods then found the rough before holing a bogey for his first dropped shot of the round. Another poor tee shot meant little on the last as he finished with another bogey. Second-placed Stricker lost ground after a bogey on three, before moving back to 15 under with gains at five and six, while others around dropped off, Stricker upped the ante at 10 and 13. McDowell birdied the opening two, but he was in trouble after finding the bunker twice on five to drop back to 15 under. He missed a good opportunity to close the gap on Woods when a mid-range putt just missed on the eighth hole. A bogey at 11 was erased by a chip-in at 13, while a birdie at 17 was cancelled out by a horrible double bogey on the last. Press Associationcenter_img Former world number one Tiger Woods picked up his biggest victory since 2009 after winning the WGC-Cadillac Championship in Miami.last_img read more

USC should embrace student-athlete pay

first_imgProviding just compensation to student-athletes — who, aside from their scholarships and a few nominal stipends, are locked out of the revenue created by the $13 billion college athletics industry — constitutes important rationale for laws challenging the NCAA’s amateurism system. However, it’s clear that the competitive atmosphere of college sports is also playing a role in the ongoing political intervention into NCAA amateurism. Since the California State Legislature took the reins of the college amateurism debate last September, enacting a bill that would allow California student-athletes to profit from their name, image and likeness starting in 2023, political intervention has emerged as a key tool to pressure NCAA reform. Obviously, the California state legislature’s willingness to tackle the issue of NCAA amateurism would not benefit USC in relation to rivals UCLA, Cal and Stanford, which are also located in California. But an advantage over programs in other states would give USC (along with the other California schools) a competitive boost at a time when they are struggling to maintain national relevance in football and men’s basketball, the two sports that would be affected most by updated amateurism rules due to their huge revenue-producing capacity. Last year, the California law presented the NCAA with two unappealing options: punish the California NCAA schools for non-compliance with its amateurism rules when the law goes into effect in 2023 or risk giving the California schools a competitive advantage by allowing their student-athletes to profit from name, image and likeness while student-athletes at schools in other states cannot. In the end, the NCAA caved, promising to reconsider its amateurism rules altogether to comply with the California law. Now, other states are considering laws that would, in turn, give their own in-state NCAA programs a competitive advantage and possibly pressure the NCAA into further reform. Also, from a competitive standpoint, USC Athletics is poised to benefit from further changes to the NCAA’s amateurism model. California’s passage of the name, image and likeness law demonstrates its status as a state at the forefront of new, innovative legal thinking and hints that it will continue to mount the most aggressive challenges to amateurism, regardless of whether they comply with NCAA rules. This will benefit USC and other California universities, allowing them to offer student-athletes the most generous compensation.center_img The NCAA’s submission to the will of the California State Legislature seems likely to usher in a period of upheaval for the NCAA’s amateurism model, which should be welcomed by college sports fans. After years of rejecting pleas to fairly compensate student-athletes, the NCAA clearly will not reform on its own accord. While some proposed state laws relating to student-athletes’ rights to compensation are not ideal, coercive action by state lawmakers is a necessary means of dismantling the unsustainable status quo in college sports. 2020 will likely prove to be a pivotal year for the future of the NCAA, with over two dozen state legislatures currently deliberating similar laws. Some of the proposals being debated, including a bill under consideration in New York that would allocate a share of ticket revenue as payment for student-athletes, would go even further than the law California passed. Jake Mequet is a junior writing about sports and law. His column, “Court in Session,” runs every other Monday.last_img read more

Ronaldo Scores 99th International Goal as Portugal Qualify for Euro 2020

first_imgHazard scores brace in Belgium’s 4-1 demolition of RussiaCristiano Ronaldo was made to wait for his 100th international goal as defending champions Portugal edged past Luxembourg 2-0 to qualify for Euro 2020.Fernando Santos’ 2016 winners required victory to confirm second spot in Group B and finish three points clear of Serbia, who drew 2-2 against Ukraine.Ronaldo tapped in his 99th goal to seal victory with four minutes remaining. Bernardo Silva’s ball over the top had allowed Bruno Fernandes to fire the visitors ahead after 39 minutes.Ronaldo must wait until the next international break in March for the chance to become just the second male player to reach 100 goals for his nation.He is now just 10 behind Iran legend Ali Daei’s world-record tally of 109, after ensuring his most prolific calendar year for Portugal with 14 goals.The Juventus forward struck his ninth international hat-trick on Thursday against Lithuania to set up the opportunity to hit a century on Sunday.However, Portugal – and Ronaldo – were left largely frustrated by an organised Luxembourg side on a difficult playing surface, with Fernandes’ control and finish before half-time a brief spark of quality in a tight game.Earlier on Saturday, Eden Hazard scored twice as Belgium continued their perfect record in Euro 2020 qualifying with a thumping win over Russia.The Red Devils, who had already qualified, were three goals up by half-time through Eden Hazard’s double and a strike by his brother Thorgan.Romelu Lukaku then added a fourth before Georgi Dzhikiya netted a late consolation for the hosts.Belgium will play their final Group I qualifier at home to Cyprus on Tuesday.Russia, who had also already booked their place at the finals, were blown away in the first half following a scintillating attacking display from Roberto Martinez’s side.The away side took the lead midway through the first half when Thorgan Hazard picked up his brother’s pass, cut inside and fired into the top corner.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more