McHUGH AND HARTE WELCOME €4.4M FOR NEW ENDOSCOPY UNIT AT LETTERKENNY HOSPITAL

first_imgThere has been a broad welcome to the news that the Government has sanctioned €4.4m to develop a new Endoscopy Unit at Letterkenny General Hospital.Deputy Joe McHugh says that construction of the unit will start this year and will take approximately two and a half years to complete. He is describing the new unit as “a major step forward for patients in the north-west”.Deputy McHugh told Donegal Daily: “The Government has this week sanctioned €4.4m for a new Endoscopy Unit at Letterkenny General Hospital. This includes €1.2m for new Endoscopy equipment, and €3.2m for building refurbishment and enabling works. “This new Endoscopy Unit will give citizens in our region access to the highest quality endoscopy procedures, and will enable our hospital to work towards becoming a centre for Colorectal screening.“I compliment the manager of Letterkenny General Hospital and his dedicated team who were working on this project over a two-year period.“This major construction project will commence this year and will take two and a half years to complete.”Senator Jimmy Harte has also welcomed the news. McHUGH AND HARTE WELCOME €4.4M FOR NEW ENDOSCOPY UNIT AT LETTERKENNY HOSPITAL was last modified: July 23rd, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:ENDOSCOPY UNITJoe McHughLetterkenny General Hospitallast_img read more

MAN UNITED WILL TRY TO LURE SEAMUS COLEMAN TO OLD TRAFFORD IN JANUARY

first_imgSeamus ColemanMANCHESTER United will try to sign Seamus Coleman in January, British newspapers are reporting.The Everton full-back signed a new five year deal with the Merseysiders last year when he was named the club’s player of the year and included in the Premiership team of the year.The Killybegs man could be part of an overall deal, the reports say, with one saying United with offer cash plus former Toffee Marounae Felliani to get their man. Coleman has been struggling with fitness after suffering an injury. MAN UNITED WILL TRY TO LURE SEAMUS COLEMAN TO OLD TRAFFORD IN JANUARY was last modified: October 1st, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:evertonman unitedseamus colemanlast_img read more

Timo Meier makes his country proud in Sharks win

first_imgSAN JOSE — Kevin Labanc celebrated his 200th NHL game the right way: scoring an overtime winner that propelled the Sharks into first place in the Western Conference.By completing their four-game homestand with a perfect record, the Sharks leapfrogged the Calgary Flames in the Pacific Division standings, erasing a seven-point deficit in just nine days. In the process, Joe Thornton moved into a tie with Stan Mikita for 14th place on the NHL’s all-time scoring list by potting his 1,467th career …last_img read more

Mars Is Losing Its Atmosphere Fast

first_img(Visited 566 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Measurements of Martian atmospheric loss rates imply incredible changes over the assumed billions of years of Mars’ history.Either Mars is younger than thought, or its atmosphere was unbelievable billions of years ago. The MAVEN spacecraft (Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution), launched in 2013, has taken atmospheric escape measurements for an entire Martian year. A Mars year is 687 Earth-days. How fast is gas being lost from the atmosphere? Quick answer is 1 to 2 kilograms per second. A report in Icarus does the math for moyboy assumptions that Mars formed 4.5 billion years ago.The loss rate extrapolated back in time gives an estimate of the total loss of gas to space and its impact on Martian climate history; an estimated 0.8 bars or more of CO2 likely has been lost.Mars is a dry, cold world today.A bar is the pressure of one Earth atmosphere at sea level. For a planet as small as Mars, that’s a lot of gas to lose. The lost hydrogen and oxygen alone could have covered the planet 75 feet deep in water!The H loss rate is not measured directly, but can be calculated from the H abundance assuming or deriving a coronal temperature. For the range in observed column abundance and temperature, the loss rate varies between ~ 1-11 x 1026 H atoms s-1. This is equivalent to a loss rate of ~ 160-1800 grams of H per second (g H s-1); assuming all of the H is coming from H2O, this is the equivalent of removal of about 1,400 – 16,000 g H2O s-1. At this rate, H from the entire column of atmospheric water at present (nominally, about 10 precipitable micrometers, or 10-3 g/cm2) would be removed in about 3,000 – 30,000 years. Over 4.2 b.y., loss at this rate would remove a global layer of water between ~ 3.6-25 m thick (see Table 2). Although we’ve expressed this as loss of water, these measurements refer to the loss of H only; we expect O from water to be lost as well, but the O loss is complicated by the fact that it also can come from CO2.At minimum the global water layer would be 12 feet deep (3.6 m). At maximum, it would be 82 feet deep (25 m). The estimated carbon dioxide lost (0.8 bar) is also highly significant. CO2 is the remaining primary constituent of the Martian atmosphere, freezing out at the poles in seasonal cycles.Lower LimitsOne significant aspect of these measurements is that they are probably lower limits. Several times in the paper, the authors remark that the loss rates could have been higher in the past: e.g., “These loss rates could be a lower limit if there are mechanisms for loss that have not been identified or observed.”The uncertainties in the extrapolation of today’s loss rates back in time get very large prior to 3.5 b.y.a., due both to uncertainties in the solar properties and to increasing uncertainties due to expected non-linearities in extrapolating atmospheric composition and properties back farther in time. We take the approach of using the extrapolated loss rates at 3.5 b.y.a. and assuming that they also apply as a constant loss rate at earlier times. This likely underestimates the loss rates at the earliest times (perhaps by as much as an order of magnitude) and the integrated loss (by a factor of several). This conservative approach therefore gives us a lower limit on the extrapolated loss.If the conservative estimate is in fact off by several orders of magnitude, would that require a global ocean kilometers deep billions of years ago? A similar error exists for the carbon dioxide esimate: “the 0.8-bar loss described earlier again is likely to be a conservative lower limit on total loss, conceivably by orders of magnitude.” Nowhere do they say their figures might represent an upper limit.Mars portrait (May 2002, NASA)Dust Storms Aggravate LossOn January 18, NASA’s Mars Exploration website headlined, “Dust Storms Linked to Gas Escape from Mars Atmosphere.” Measurements in that prior study indicated that gas loss is not in a steady state, as earlier believed, but becomes amplified during dust storms. The storms heave water vapor up high into the atmosphere, where it is more prone to escape:The Mars Climate Sounder on MRO can scan the atmosphere to directly detect dust and ice particles and can indirectly sense water vapor concentrations from effects on temperature. [Nicholas] Heavens and co-authors of the new paper report the sounder’s data show slight increases in middle-atmosphere water vapor during regional dust storms and reveal a sharp jump in the altitude reached by water vapor during the 2007 global dust storm. Using recently refined analysis methods for the 2007 data, the researchers found an increase in water vapor by more than a hundred-fold in the middle atmosphere during that global storm.The MAVEN measurements, taken over an entire Martian year, “smooth out” short-term fluctuations to give a more averaged escape rate that can be extrapolated. But there were no global dust storms during the measurement year. Since global dust storms occur regularly, and would have been frequent over billions of years, it seems safe to presume that the extrapolated values are, indeed, orders of magnitude too low.Astrobiology Magazine admits that “The planet has lost the majority of its once much denser and wetter atmosphere, causing it to evolve into the dry, arid world we see today,” but does not mention the rapid rate of loss. It does, however, point out that the carbon dioxide that sublimates from the polar caps each season reaches much higher into the atmosphere than previously thought. “This sublimation process was thought to mostly only affect the lower atmosphere – we didn’t expect to see its effects clearly propagating upwards to higher levels,” said a scientist for ESA’s Mars Express mission. This fact could be in agreement with MAVEN’s conclusion that the atmosphere might have been lost more rapidly than the lower limit suggests. And how much “denser and wetter” would moyboys be willing to accept for a primordial Mars?ImplicationsArt of dust devils on MarsIf these extrapolations billions of years into the past are reasonable, they imply a very, very different Mars than what we observe today. “Loss to space has been the major process driving climate change on Mars,” they note. The Mars we see today is dominated by sand dunes, a crackling-dry atmosphere charged with static electricty, a surface too cold for liquid water, dust devils, large shield volcanoes, a deep dry canyon thousands of miles long, and global dust storms like the one enveloping Mars right now (Phys.org). Are planetary scientists prepared to deal with a Mars possessing a thicker atmosphere than the Earth, covered possibly in a deep ocean of water? How did that form outside the habitable zone of a dimmer sun?Watch the hydrobioscopy speculators jump on the possibility of life with all that water. They won’t, however, be able to point to the other geological features as underwater sand dunes and underwater volcanoes. They think those features formed eons ago. How much did Mars have to dry out before those volcanoes and dunes could even begin to form? The measured loss rate appears to put them in a hopeless bind: their view of Martian history contradicts the loss rate of the atmosphere. Creationists, get out your calculators; a clear alternative solution is that Mars is not billions of years old.last_img read more

In London, voting for South Africa

first_img16 April 2009 Twenty-five years ago, the crowds that gathered in Trafalgar Square to protest and demonstrate against apartheid South Africa played a major role in galvanising international opinion against apartheid and hastening its downfall. Yesterday, South Africans gathered in their thousands in orderly queues to have their say in the future of the democratic South Africa in the same place that the demonstrators once stood. With 7&nbps;427 South African voters marking their crosses in 12 hours, the South African High Commision in London was not only the country’s largest voting station abroad, but was also nearly twice the size of the largest one in South Africa – Joubert Park in Johannesburg with between 3 000 to 4 000 voters, according to the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC). I have never seen such a large group of South Africans behaving in such a subdued manner. Perhaps it had something to do with being in the historic Trafalgar Square on an overcast – and sometimes wet – London spring day. Perhaps it had something to do with the the tiny figure of Lord Nelson on his towering column peering out over Parliament Square, where an animated statue of our own Nelson Mandela is flanked by the likes of Winston Churchill, Margaret Thatcher and General Jan Smuts, the only other South African in the Square. Perhaps, it had to do with the fact that it was very early in the morning. But I suspect it had more to do with the reverence of voting – the universal way for ordinary citizens to have a say in their country and the future. They queued ten-deep across Trafalgar Square and the length of the facade of the iconic South Africa House. It was a day on which South Africans filed onto South African soil in unprecedented numbers thanks to a decision by the Constitutional Court – the cornerstone of South Africa’s democracy – which required government to extend voting facilities to all South Africans abroad who are on the voters roll. They waited quietly, patiently, reading the latest copy of The South African, chatting quietly about why they were in the UK, why they were voting, exchanging their memories, hopes and fears for their beloved country. It also took me back to 1994 when I had felt so priveleged to be part of the first election in which all South Africans were able to vote – most for the first time. The long queues snaked sometimes for kilometres and many South Africans got to know each other for the first time as they waited for hours to make their crosses. Back then it was both a deeply moving , humbling and empowering experience. And so it was again yesterday. This time, the voters were mainly young, mainly white and all were united by the decision to have a say in their country and in choosing the next government. It also took me back to the mid-1980s, when I served as a correspondent for the South African morning group of newspapers – including the Rand Daily Mail and the Cape Times – when I covered almost constant demonstrations and protests by South African exiles and large numbers of committed members of the British public who played such a crucial role in ending apartheid. Seldom in the history of freedom struggles has there been such a display of international solidarity by a nation as was the case with the British public’s involvement in the Anti-Apartheid Movement. Today photographic records of those protests are displayed on the walls of South African House and many famous faces are still recognisable – Thabo Mbeki, the late Harold Wilson, the late Archbishop Trevor Huddleston, Abdul Minty, Peter Hain, the alte Mike Terry and many more. As I stood waiting and chatting to fellow South Africans, I was humbled that we would not be standing there voting in a democratic election in South Africa had it not been for the suffering and sacrifice of thousands of South Africans in resisting apartheid for all those years . Many gave their lives, many sacrificed family members and friends. I was overcome by a deep humility tinged with pride. John Battersby is UK Country Manager of the International Marketing Council of South Africa and former editor of the Sunday Independent.last_img read more

Driving a new vision for Africa

first_imgThe 2011 Brand Africa Forum, sponsored by Brand South Africa and Brand Leadership Academy, saw an impressive range of pan-African, diasporan and global thought leaders, influencers and decision-makers coming together to debate how Africa can drive its growth, reputation and competitiveness.Youngsters from organisations likeBrightest Young Minds, One YoungWorld and the African LeadershipAcademy took part in a paneldiscussion on their vision for Africa.(Image: Ray Maota)The event was held on 29 September at the Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg and attracted more than 300 government, business and civil society representatives.Special focus areas included the role of the nation brand in economic development, governance and sustainability on the continent, economic lessons for Africa and the role of business in driving progress.The significance of South Africa joining Brazil, Russia, India and China in the BRICS bloc was explored, along with lessons to be learnt from emerging markets.The forum shone the spotlight on youth and their vision for the continent by including a panel of young leaders from Kenya, South Africa, Uganda and Senegal.The inaugural Brand 100 Awards for Africa also took place at the forum.In the opening address, Brand South Africa chairperson Anitha Soni challenged African nations to cooperate in developing strong country brands to improve the continent’s global competitiveness, adding that this would require better cooperation and information-sharing among countries on the continent.“For us, Brand South Africa’s involvement in the Brand Africa Forum is a natural fit because the health of Africa’s brand is important for the strength and health of our own nation brand,” said Brand SA CEO Miller Matola.“If countries on the continent improve in terms of their image and reputation, the same holds for South Africa. Our prosperity is inextricably linked to that of the other countries on the continent,” he said.Nation branding: we must walk the talk“National branding is not about slogans, it is about what you do and what they think, that matters. If one does not change the negative perceptions they will become realities. In Africa we are good at talking and planning, but weak in implementing. We must walk the talk,” said Zimbabwe’s Deputy Prime Minister Dr Arthur Mutambara.“A brand must transcend political affiliations and should not be the sole property of a set political party … It must be taken it personally because we will never be respected as Africans unless Africa has done well as a continent. This goes the same for individual countries,” he added.Telling it like it isGlobal economist Dr Dambisa Moyo spoke frankly about the current economic crisis, the sovereign debt crisis extending beyond Europe, and Africa’s place in the global picture.“We could be in for a 10-year bear market and recessionary environment. Where does Africa fit into this?” she asked. “We’re facing a very serious problem … there are simply not enough resources to go around.”Moyo said in the coming years the world will increasingly struggle due to a shortage of arable land, energy constraints and a lack of food security, compounded by a lack of water.“This is particularly in the context of the famine that’s going on in the Horn of Africa,” she added.“There are about 1-billion people in the world who go hungry every day – and the majority of them are on this continent. And yet, Africa has the largest amount of untilled land left on the planet.”As an economist, Moyo sees this in terms of supply and demand: “We’ve got hungry people, and we’ve got land.”When there’s a food crisis in Africa, the first response of NGOs is often to “provide a so-called band aid solution, sending bags of maize to Somalia or Ethiopia immediately”.Moyo said she doesn’t find this objectionable, but as an economist, she believes it presents a structural problem.“We’ve got to get to the root cause: why is it that Africa, in the last 30 years, has been the only continent that has failed to feed itself – especially in light of the fact that we have the most untilled land?”But there is some good news, she added: “In a future world of 9-billion people, in a world where we know there are going to be supply constraints in commodities and resources, Africa has an important role to play.“But before we can actually get to a point where we are producing food and coming up with innovative ways to develop, we need to deal with Brand Africa.”Moyo said Africans had to proactively discuss and respond to its important role in the future of the world.“Without us getting our heads around this, it’s all just wonderful conversation – but it’s not going to help us in the long term.”Addressing forum delegates, Moyo concluded: “I urge you in your discussions today – and when you return to your respective businesses – to really focus on where the world is going, and to also focus on Africa and its very important role in the future.“The winners in the decades to come will be the people who look to Africa as a place of business opportunity and a place for partnerships – not as a place that is a drag on the world economy.” What Africa should do to be a powerful continent?Malik Fal, MD of Endeavour spoke about the Africa 2.0: Kenya Report. Endeavour is a New-York based NGO dedicated to the promotion of entrepreneurship in emerging markets.The report is a manifesto of the envisioned economic and political transition Africa should take if it is to rightfully claim its spot as a powerful continent.Fal said: “The manifesto is the collective effort of young African’s views about what Africa should do to be a powerful continent.”Fal added that Africa was in danger of developing presidential monarchies, with leaders favouring their children to become future presidents. He said this was the same as a dictatorship.The report, which comes out in October 2011, will have four main themes: uplifting African’s; creating and sharing African wealth; upgrading Africa’s infrastructure and creating a stable environment for growth.Seeing Africa through the eyes of a youngstersCedric Ntumba, an executive at Capitalworks Investment Partners, led a panel of youngsters in discussing their vision of Africa in the future and how their goals could be achieved.The panel included Gertrude Kitongo of Kenya and Ralph Baumgarten of South Africa – both from Brightest Young Minds organisation; Zamatungwa Khumalo and Erik de Ridder – both of South Africa from the One Young World organisation; and Francis Ekii of Uganda and Linda Rebeiz of Senegal, from the African Leadership Academy.Ntumba asked the panel what should be done to inspire African youngsters.“Youngsters should be forward thinking and their thoughts should sketch a positive future,” Baumgarten said.De Ridder added that for the youngsters of Africa to be inspired, countries should have a human-centred approach to development and that young people should take ownership of the fact that they are the future.Ekii said: “Youngsters should be proactive and not reactive to their situations.”He cited an example of how, when he was just 13 years old, he and a few friends from his hometown in Uganda took it upon themselves to talk openly about HIV in the community.When Khumalo was asked how youngsters from other continents welcomed African youth, she said: “Youngsters from other parts of the world have a warped sense of Africa and African youngsters are more receptive to the outside world than their counterparts.”BRICS and the role of AfricaA panel discussion on South Africa’s role in the BRICS grouping of nations was chaired by Abdullah Verachia, Director of Frontier Advisory.The panel included Ajai Chowdry, chair of HCL in India; Dr Vijay Mahajan, author of Africa Rising; Dr MG Vaidyan, CEO of the State Bank of India in South Africa; James Mwangi, global managing partner at Dalberg and Christine Jiang, from Huawei Technologies.Chowdry said that for Africa was to protect itself from the effects of the looming economic crisis, Africa had to play an indirect role in helping Europe by keeping its domestic consumption growing.He said South Africa would play a direct role with its involvement in BRICS as the bloc would probably contribute money as a group to the International Monetary Fund.Dr Vaidyan said: “India understood early on like China that population size is not a burden but an asset, and an asset should be maintained.”Vaidyan said that although India had a large population; it had 18 000 colleges, 350 universities and 1-million schools to provide education to its citizens.“The country also recognised that for urban India to progress, rural India has to be developed, that is why at least 40% of the loans we give are to small-scale farmers. South Africa needs to follow that route if it is to be a major player in the BRICS grouping,” said Dr Vaidyan.Mahajan said Africa’s greatest challenge was its migrants overseas who talked negatively about their native countries, creating a warped view of the continent. Africa should make sure its “ambassadors” in foreign countries celebrated Africa, he added.Speaking about competition between companies in the BRICS grouping, Mahajan said: “Africa should not just roll out the red carpet for companies from the BRIC grouping to invest in the respective countries on the continent, but should advocate for African companies to also invest in those markets.”Brand Africa 100 awardsThe inaugural Brand Africa 100 awards also took place during forum, giving credit to the continent’s most valued brands as voted for by pan-African consumers.Research methodology for the awards was developed by the Brand Leadership Academy in partnership with TNS, a globally respected consumer knowledge and information company, and Brand Finance – the world’s leading independent valuation consultancy.“One of the primary drivers of Africa’s growth lies in stimulating and growing thriving African and global businesses and brands in Africa,” said Thebe Ikalafeng, founder and chairperson of Brand Africa.Ikalafeng added that consumers were the ultimate arbiters of a brand’s success and that the awards would show which brands are getting it right on the continent.The award sector categories included food, beverages, electronics, telecoms, automotive, apparel, banks, oil and gas, retail and personal care.Credit was also given to the most valued non-African brand, the most valued brand in Africa and the Grand Prix award for the most valued African brand overall.The winning brands were:Food – McDonaldsBeverages – Coca-ColaElectronics – SamsungTelecoms – MTNAutomotive – ToyotaApparel – NikeBanks – AbsaOil and gas – ShellRetail – Blue BandPersonal Care – NiveaThe most valued non-African brand went to Shell, while MTN was voted the most valued brand in Africa and took the Grand Prix award.last_img read more

Hirsch departs, Burkett now serving as OFBF president

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Frank Burkett III of Massillon has been elected the 24th president of the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation (OFBF). Burkett now holds the highest elected OFBF office.Burkett was elected by OFBF’s board of trustees upon the resignation of Steve Hirsch of Chillicothe, who left the OFBF board to stand for election to the Nationwide board of directors. Hirsch served as the organization’s president for five years.Burkett has been OFBF’s first vice president for the past two years. He previously served as treasurer and has been on the state board since 2007. Burkett will continue to serve as the District 9 trustee representing members from Columbiana, Mahoning, Portage and Stark counties.The new president is a long-time member of Stark County Farm Bureau where he was a board trustee, policy development chairman and farm tour chairman. He is a past board member for Ohio Dairy Producers Association and is a member of Rivertree Christian Church. He has a bachelor’s degree in agriculture from Ohio State University with a major in agricultural systems management and a minor in agricultural economics. Burkett, in partnership with three uncles, co-owns and manages Clardale Farms, Inc., a dairy and crop farm.In addition, James W. (Bill) Patterson of Chesterland has been elected first vice president of OFBF. He assumes the second highest elected office in the organization.Patterson has served as the organization’s treasurer since 2014. He joined OFBF’s board of trustees in 2011. He will continue as the District 4 trustee representing Ashtabula, Geauga, Lake and Trumbull counties. Patterson replaced Burkett.Patterson and his wife, Mindy, farm with his family, raising apples, strawberries and peaches. They also have a farm market and a wholesale cider operation. They are the parents of two sons.A 22-year member of Geauga County Farm Bureau, he served as its president and vice president. He is a member of the Farm Credit Mid-America board of directors and the Ohio Produce Growers and Marketers Association. Patterson received his bachelor’s degree in agricultural economics from Ohio State University. He also is a graduate of Ohio’s Leadership Education and Development Program – Class VII.Replacing Patterson is Cy Prettyman of New Bloomington, who has been elected treasurer of the OFBF, the third highest elected office.Prettyman was elected to the board of trustees in 2012 as the trustee for District 7. He will continue to represent members in that district composed of Crawford, Marion, Morrow and Richland counties.Prettyman farms with his family, raising corn, soybeans, and cattle for freezer beef. He also is a sales specialist with Purina Animal Nutrition. A 19-year member of Marion County Farm Bureau, Prettyman has served as its president and has been active with local and state Pork Producers councils and Ohio Cattlemen’s Association.He has a bachelor’s degree in animal science from Ohio State University. He and his wife, Julie, have a daughter and son. They attend Trinity Evangelical UMC in Upper Sandusky.last_img read more

Glenn Harsh, Oct. 29

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Harvest is progressing well. We are within a day of being done with soybeans. Unfortunately that is in about five or six little fields.We started on corn, but we have a ways to go. So far yields are very good. I had a couple of poorer fields that got planted later and they were right around 50 bushels. The rest of my fields have been in the 60s with some fields going 68 or 69 bushels so the yields were very good for the vast majority of the soybeans. We have only done a couple of corn fields. One was the north side of 200 and the other one we really pushed this year and it was over 250. I am interested to see what our more average fields are doing, but we haven’t made it that far yet.We got .9-inch of rain at the home farm over the weekend. I’m not sure other farms got quite that much. With being on tracks, we are going to a farm with a gravel entrance we can park the trucks on that we are going to try later this afternoon.The first field of beans I took off had some stink bug damage. We got out of that until some of the later fields where we found some more stink bug damage. These fields were scouted and they must have come in really late in the season. It was a little disheartening when you try to scout through the season and then you see something still come in and do damage to your crop. For us it was not a major issue, though. We may have had a couple of loads that could have had some issues if we were hauling them in, but we are not in too bad of shape. I have heard about some loads getting rejected and we haven’t had anything to that magnitude.We had to haul some landlord crop in last week and we were limited on which elevators we went to. They got us through fairly quickly. We did have to wait maybe an hour or an hour and a half on some loads. We have enough bins that we can hold almost everything and we don’t have to mess with it a whole lot.We are getting the cover crops seeded with a hi-boy in the corn. I can see each of the species growing out there in the six-way mix and that is looking good. Behind the soybeans we use a Turbo-Seeder behind soybeans and the first cover crop that we put in is coming up there also.last_img read more

Your “Real” Friends are Your Online Friends (or so Says Gen Y)

first_imgIs it easier to talk to your online buddies than your friends out there in the “real world?” Do you feel like you know more about what’s happening in the lives of your Facebook and MySpace friends than with those who don’t have accounts or don’t bother to update them? According to a recent UK MySpace study of over 16,000 social network users, these sorts of feelings are common among today’s younger generation. The study revealed that a good portion of this group admits to feeling more comfortable sharing and communicating with friends online than they do when logged out of cyberspace. Online: Sharing is Easier, Friends Know You BetterThe MySpace study asked social networking users between the ages of 14 and 21 (aka “Generation Y”) questions about their interactions both on social networks and in their real life, too. Some 36% of the respondents said they found it easier to talk about themselves online than in the real world, leading them to share more about themselves using technology. This group also felt that their online friends knew more about them, and so, in a sense, were closer than offline friends because they all knew what was going on in each other’s lives. Outside of the social networking sites, the survey respondents overwhelmingly felt ill-at-ease in social groups. A whopping 72% said they felt “left out” and didn’t think they fit into any particular group. More than four-fifths (82%) said they moved between four or more different groups of friends in an effort to find acceptance. It’s not entirely surprising that the younger generation feels this way. The teen years (and young adulthood to some extent) are a time when kids start exploring and experimenting with many different aspects of their personalities as they attempt to solidify who they are and who they will become as adults. What’s interesting, though, is how social networking is having an impact on this traditional coming-of-age process. Instead of simply feeling disjointed, confused, and lonely, today’s younger generation has an outlet for connecting with their peers which previous generations did not: the internet. Says Rebekah Horne, MySpace Europe managing director, the study provides insight into how this generation is “using online as a way to explore and settle into their burgeoning identities.”But at what cost? Will the younger generations remain awkward and shy in the real world as they age, only finding comfort in their interactions that occur online? Or does having an outlet for their feelings simply lessen the blow delivered by the otherwise often harsh process that is growing up? In many ways, easy access to technology can be seen as both a blessing and a curse for this young group of digital natives. These days, you’ll often encounter teens having text message conversations or posting status updates while ignoring the very friends they’re present with in the real world. Behavior like this could certainly send a message to the others that they are second priority to whomever else has engaged their friend’s attention. That could easily lead to feelings of being “left out” as reported in this study. And yet, at the same time, it’s this very technology that’s allowing the teens and young adults to feel like they have friends who know them and care about them.The issue is balancing that online life with the one out in the real world. The question as to whether this sort of behavior is healthy is one best left to psychologists to analyze and report, but there’s no doubt that at the very least, it is having an impact. Image credit: flickr user Paulo Fehlauer Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Related Posts center_img Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Tags:#NYT#social networks#Trends#web sarah perezlast_img read more

Which electronic calculators do you like?

first_img “I just want a good calculator that works, stays in the mode that I’ve selected without swapping over to anything else while Iu2019m in the middle of using it, and which has enough battery power to last me the day! Anything short of this isn’t good enough March 29, 2019 at 10:55 am Editor’s note: Our good friend Max is looking for any suggestions for electronic calculators and solvers. Nothing’s too great or too small. Let him know which you think might be worth including in EEWeb.com’s list of tools.  Every now and then, an unexpected ray of sunshine breaks through the clouds to brighten my life. Such an event just transpired. Moments ago, as I pen these words, I was informed by those who don the undergarments of authority and stride the corridors of power that we are going to add to EEWeb’s collection of electronic calculators. (Source: pixabay.com) The only downside is that, based on the capricious and convoluted reverse chronological reality (RCR) favored by those who dwell in the hallowed halls of destiny and delight in casting the dice to determine our fates, they now want to know why I didn’t preemptively commence this task last week. They care not to hear my tales of woe regarding my inability to obtain the parts that I need to repair my time machine. What they want is results! (Their exclamation point, not mine.)Specifically, what we are talking about here is calculator and solver-type tools targeted at the designers of electronic systems. For your delectation and delight, a list of our existing calculators and solvers is presented below (I’ve not included the more sophisticated tools like schematic capture, simulation, and PCB layout).What I’m asking of you is suggestions for any similar calculators and solvers that you would like us to add to EEWeb.com. Don’t be afraid. Let your imagination run wild and free. What do you think about acoustic calculators, or power calculators, or…? If you have any suggestions, now is your chance to shout them from the rooftops (metaphorically speaking). All you have to do is post your suggestions as comments in my article and/or email me at and we’ll take it from there.>> See Max’s article on our sister site, EEWeb: “Which Electronic Calculators Should We….” March 25, 2019 at 12:52 pm Log in to Reply Continue Reading Previous Kontron: 3U CP3005-SA CPU board works in extended temperature range of -40 to +70°CNext Renesas: bidirectional synchronous buck-boost controllers for battery-powered applications Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInMoreRedditTumblrPinterestWhatsAppSkypePocketTelegram Tags: EDA “Hi Mel — thanks for your feedback — Max” MelBrandle says: March 25, 2019 at 1:14 pm 3 thoughts on “Which electronic calculators do you like?” Log in to Reply Log in to Reply Max The Magnificent says: MarkSindone says: “I personally have no personal favourites on digital calculators because of how simple my workload usually is. It depends on what your calculations require of you and whether or not you would need to perform complex calculations that are more than just bas Leave a Reply Cancel reply You must Register or Login to post a comment. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.last_img read more