Luke Schwasnick’s tenacity and size help Syracuse lacrosse win ground balls on faceoffs

first_imgMatt Hankin | Design Editor Published on April 18, 2016 at 10:12 pm Contact Paul: pmschwed@syr.edu | @pschweds The only thing Luke Schwasnick cares about is getting the ball. He doesn’t care that he only plays for a fraction of games. He doesn’t care if he needs to sacrifice his body. He doesn’t even care if he has to take out his own teammates in practice.About a month or two ago, assistant coach Kevin Donahue had to tell Schwasnick to settle down. Schwasnick ran in from the side of the field at full speed and crashed into faceoff specialist Ben Williams, arguably Syracuse’s most valuable player.“I just always have that thought in my mind,” Schwasnick said. “You got to get the ball.”The 6-foot-1, 228-pound redshirt freshman has made his biggest mark on No. 8 Syracuse (7-4, 2-2 Atlantic Coast) in the past two games while picking up four ground balls, half of his season total. He’s played an increasing amount as the Orange’s short-stick midfielder rushing in from the wing on faceoffs. Known for his physical nature at the position, Schwasnick utilizes his size while providing depth for SU.Though playing on the wing in college is much more specialized than it was in high school, Orange coaches have seen Schwasnick’s potential on the wing for years.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“He’s fearless. He’s big, strong, athletic,” Syracuse head coach John Desko said. “I know why we recruited him. You can see it in him, just him physically and athletically.”The most comfortable Schwasnick has felt all season came against Cornell on April 12. For the first time, he received significant reps on the wing, where Tom Grimm received the majority of time in the beginning of the season. But Grimm went down with an injury on April 2, and SU had been scrambling for answers since.In came Schwasnick, who plays with a tenacity that matches his size. He’s as tall as any of Syracuse’s short-stick defensive midfielders. He’s 30 pounds bigger than the second heaviest. And when he rushes in from the wing, opposing players have to take notice.“Wow, that’s a big boy,” short-stick midfielder Paolo Ciferri said of his first impressions of Schwasnick. “He’s going to be able to knock some people around.” Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Related Stories Paolo Ciferri fills in as Syracuse lacrosse defensive midfielder Against North Carolina on Saturday, Schwasnick got even more playing time than against Cornell.About 10 minutes into the game, the ball squirted toward UNC’s attacks after a faceoff. Schwasnick charged toward them and knocked the ball away from the player who had it. As the scrum continued, he kept boxing out. And after another Tar Heels player picked it up, he leaped into the air, wrapped his stick around their body and forced another loose ball before SU eventually earned the possession.Then midway through the second quarter, Schwasnick matched up against North Carolina’s Steve Pontrello. As Pontrello caught a pass about 12 yards in front of Syracuse’s net, he didn’t shield himself from pressure. Schwasnick took a running start and laid his body into the 5-foot-9, 198-pound Pontrello. When the two collided, Pontrello, his stick and the ball dropped to the turf as the Orange began its transition offense.“Schwasnick’s been great. He’s been terrific,” Desko said. “He’s just a warrior in there.”As Williams and UNC’s Stephen Kelly battled for even just a sliver of space to flip the ball out to their teammates, Schwasnick fought to get in position for the faceoff win.They often ended up in a stalemate and Schwasnick was forced to box out. And that’s what he does best.“I love the position. I love the grinding mentality,” Schwasnick said. “… The whole physical aspect is something else I thrive off of.”With Grimm injured, Ciferri and Joe Gillis had to take on a more physically-taxing role as defensive midfielders. But by adding Schwasnick into the rotation on the wing, Ciferri and Gillis can save their energy.In his first season receiving playing time, Schwasnick can still improve his offense and defense. For the time being, though, he’s able to contribute by sticking to his simple “get the ball” mindset.“I think you’ll see him a lot on the wing going forward,” Desko said. Commentslast_img read more

All international football should be postponed, says FIFA

first_imgFIFA boss InfantinoParis, France | AFP |  FIFA on Friday recommended that all international football matches scheduled for March and April be postponed due to the spread of the new coronavirus.Falling short of banning matches outright, world football’s governing body said that clubs would be allowed to refuse to send their players to national squad gatherings in March and April.FIFA also said that it was working on rescheduling qualifying matches for the 2022 World Cup in both Asia and South America which have been postponed.“All international matches previously scheduled to take place in March and April should now be postponed until such time that they can take place in a safe and secure environment,” FIFA said. FIFA added that the “final decision” on any postponements “rests with the respective competition organisers or relevant member association in case of friendlies”.FIFA rules normally oblige clubs to release players for national team matches, but this rule has been temporarily reversed.“In light of the current situation concerning the Coronavirus, FIFA has decided that general football rules which normally oblige clubs to release players for national team matches will not apply for the up-coming international windows in March/April,” the statement said.Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

City of Olympia Converts to LED Streetlights

first_imgFacebook23Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by City of OlympiaFrom now through January, Olympia’s city-owned streetlights will be converted from existing HPS (High Pressure Sodium) to new Light Emitting Diode (LED) technology. A contract firm, the Light Doctor, is performing the work. The general schedule is as follows:Westside         OctoberSoutheast        NovemberNortheast        DecemberDowntown       JanuaryOlympia has about 3,200 city-owned streetlights located primarily along major roadways and in newer neighborhoods. In addition, Puget Sound Energy (PSE) owns about 1,300 streetlights in Olympia, which are typically on wooden poles. The PSE-owned lights are not being converted at this time, although PSE is supporting the City project with energy savings rebates.Funding for the project is a combination of City money, a $500,000 State Department of Commerce Energy Efficiency Grant, and PSE energy savings rebates with an estimated $375,000 value.Benefits of LED TechnologyIncreased reliability. LEDs have an extremely low failure rate, which means less outages and reduced maintenance costs.Reduced power consumption. We estimate savings of $174,000 per year.Enhanced pedestrian safety. LED light is focused more directly toward the ground.Better light quality. Colors are more identifiable due to the neutral color of LED lights.last_img read more

AVANZARE PRESSES PACE AND TAKES GRADE II, $200,000 ARCADIA STAKES BY 1 ¼ LENGTHS; STEVENS, PROCTOR TEAM FOR VICTORY AS 5-YEAR-OLD GETS ONE MILE ON TURF IN 1:34.17

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Jan. 31, 2015)–Consistent Avanzare pressed the pace and went on to an impressive 1 ¼ length win in Saturday’s Grade II, $200,000 Arcadia Stakes at Santa Anita. Ridden by Gary Stevens and trained by Tom Proctor, Avanzare bested a half dozen older horses and got one mile on turf in 1:34.17.A close third two starts back in Santa Anita’s Grade II City of Hope Mile (turf) on Oct. 4, the 5-year-old Grand Reward gelding came off a third place run on synthetic Polytrack in the Grade III Native Diver Stakes Nov. 29.“I breezed him five days ago on the dirt and when I looked at the work, he had the second fastest work that morning,” said Stevens, in reference to a five furlong main track breeze in 59 flat, second best of 51 at the distance.”Owned by Donato Lanni and John Youngblood, Avanzare was off at 5-1 and paid $13.80, $6.20 and $3.80. In his third Southern California start, he improved his overall mark to 12-6-3-2 and with the winner’s share of $120,000, increased his bankroll to $385,180.Winning trainer Proctor had no comment.Ridden by Mike Smith, Za Approval got a perfect stalking trip and ran second, finishing three quarters of a length in front of Home Run Kitten. The second choice in the wagering at 3-1, Za Approval paid $4.40 and $3.20.Home Run Kitten stalked the pace and was third, two lengths off the lead turning for home but proved third best under Joe Talamo, finishing 1 ¾ lengths in front of 6-5 favorite Kaigun. Off at 3-1, Home Run Kitten paid $3.00 to show.Kaigun flattend out late and had no apparent excuses under Corey Nakatani.Fractions on the race were 23.05, 46.95, 1:10.59 and 1:22.25.last_img read more