No trial date yet for Nova Scotia police chief facing sexual assault

first_imgBRIDGEWATER, N.S. – The case of a Nova Scotia police chief accused of sexually assaulting a 17-year-old girl has been set over until a pre-trial consultation Aug. 9.At that time, it’s expected a trial date will be set in Nova Scotia Supreme Court for John Collyer.Collyer of the Bridgewater Police Service was placed on administrative leave in August 2016 after the province’s Serious Incident Response Team confirmed it was investigating the alleged assault.The 26-year veteran of the force was suspended in May 2017 after the independent police watchdog charged him with one count of sexual assault and two counts of sexual exploitation.The girl was 17 at the time of the alleged offences in Bridgewater between April and July of 2016.In July 2017, Collyer elected to have the case heard by judge alone in Nova Scotia Supreme Court.last_img read more

DB inspector stabbed in Dhaka

first_imgDMCAn inspector of Detective Branch (DB) of police was injured as a group of muggers stabbed him at Mouchak in the city early Sunday, reports news agency UNB.Police said DB inspector Mahbubul Haque was returning his residence from his Mintu Road office riding on a rickshaw in the morning.When Haque reached in front of Sirajul Islam Medical College and Hospital at Mouchak, a group of muggers waylaid him and snatched away his wallet.As the DB inspector tried to resist them, the miscreants stabbed him, leaving the detective injured.Later, he was taken to Dhaka Medical College and Hospital (DMCH), said assistant sub-inspectorBabul Miah of DMCH Police Camp.last_img read more

Primary question paper now leaked in Natore

first_img-Authorities have postponed final examinations of mathematics of class-I and IV at 102 government primary schools in Sadar upazila of Natore on Monday following an allegation of question paper leakage, reports UNB.Acting district primary education officer (DPEO) Anwar Hossian said Monday’s examinations of Mathematics were postponed after a person showed a hand-written question paper at Agdigha Government Primary School prior to beginning the examination.It matched with the real question paper that created a row in the area, the DPEO said, adding that on information, upazila administration and education officers visited the spot.Later, deputy commissioner of the district formed a three-member probe body, headed by assistant commissioner (land) in Sadar upazila Shamim Bhuiyan, to investigate into the matter.last_img read more

AIST group measures objects in 3D with camera projector w Video

first_imgvia Diginfo Sagawa foresees such a system as having use in research about using the body to control things like multimedia, virtual reality, and games. He also said that data obtained by this measurement method could be used to analyze how athletes move.” He can imagine the system being used to measure the movements of an athlete in the middle of a stadium, from a long way away, for example. If we can do that, we think this method would be great for making 3-D videos as well.”Actually, the possibilities may go beyond what they have already considered. “Currently, we’ve stopped at the stage of making measurements. But we’re also thinking about how to use the measured data. We’d like to work on applications to sports science and materials analysis.” Another possibility, as long as the patterns can be captured, is to apply the system to work with different devices, too. “We’d also like to keep increasing the range of things that can be measured.” Citation: AIST group measures objects in 3-D with camera, projector (w/ Video) (2012, August 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-08-aist-group-d-camera-projector.html The team says the value of their method is that it can provide more measurement positions than conventional motion capture, and can be used in scenarios where shapes have been difficult to measure because they change too fast. They also say that their method is precise, with a tolerance of just 1-2 mm. Ryusuku Sagawa, service Robotics Research Group, Intelligent Systems Research Institute at AIST, presided over the camera and projector demo. “If you look carefully, you can see that each line is wavy. The wavy line patterns are carefully designed, so the pattern from the projector can be recognized from the camera image. This makes it possible to use the projector and the camera for triangulation, so we can know the shape at that instant.” 1ms pan-tilt camera system tracks the flying balls (w/ Video) Explore furthercenter_img (Phys.org) — Got camera? Got projector? Then you can measure objects in 3-D. A group at the Advanced Industrial Science and Technology Institute (AIST) has had no problem doing that. The researchers have demonstrated their method for measuring objects in 3-D, using only a camera and projector. Patterned light is projected on to the object and pattern images captured by the camera are processed to measure its 3-D shape. More information: © 2012 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more