Chelsea reportedly keen on Stuttgart defender Rudiger

first_imgChelsea are one of several clubs keen on Stuttgart defender Antonio Rudiger, according to the Express.Manchester United and West Ham are also said to be interested in the 21-year-old along with Juventus, Bayern Munich and Monaco.“Of course I am aware of the interest from Manchester United,” he is quoted as saying.“They are definitely one of the top clubs in Europe and they are in a league I have been dreaming of. The Premier League is very physical, intense, breathtaking and with a lot of goals.“My focus, though, remains on playing for Stuttgart. For now, I just have to try and progress as a player.”The Express once again suggest Chelsea are trying to sign Sami Khedira, with reports in Spain claiming that Arsenal have already held talks with the Real Madrid midfielder over a £100,000-a-week deal.Chelsea boss Jose Mourinho is said to be considering making a bid. Khedira played under him at Real.And the Daily Star claim Arsenal could try to beat Chelsea to the signing of Paris St-Germain forward Edinson Cavani, who has also been repeatedly touted as a Blues transfer target.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Fishing the North Coast: Kings still sitting at Humboldt Bay entrance

first_imgNot much has changed since the Aug. 1 opener.The salmon remain stacked just outside of the entrance to Humboldt Bay. The only real wild card the boats face on day to day basis is whether the forecast will be accurate, and will the salmon be on the north or south side of the jetty.While not every day has ended with limits of big, fat kings, it’s about as good of fishing as anywhere on the coast. And it’s been steady too. There have been a few days where the weather allowed a little more …last_img read more

Great astronomy, with or without SKA

first_imgThe KAT-7 radio telescope array isoperational and has produced its firstimages. The SKA site, near Carnarvon in theNorthern Cape, is in the middle ofa proclaimed radio astronomy reserve. No mobile phones or other electronicdevices are permitted in the reserve. Prof Justin Jonas is optmistic about SouthAfrica’s chances of winning the SKA bid.(Images: Janine Erasmus) MEDIA CONTACTS • Tommy Makhode  Dept of Science and Technology  +27 12 843 6793 or +27 82 379 8268• Marina Joubert  SKA South Africa communications  +27 83 409 4254 RELATED ARTICLES • SA’s SKA takes another step forward • MeetKAT in demand among scientists • Space science thriving in SA • Gallery: the KAT-7 radio telescope • SA assists with Nasa’s Mars missionJanine ErasmusSouth Africa is one of two finalists bidding to host the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), and with its rival Australia is awaiting the recommendation of the SKA Site Advisory Committee, due in February 2012.But whether or not the US$1.9-billion ($15.9-billion) project goes ahead, the local astronomy sector has already made huge strides.Speaking in Cape Town in December, South Africa’s deputy science and technology minister Derek Hanekom said that the SKA project has got the country’s brightest young minds excited about astronomy.Hanekom added that the SKA is a major catalyst for human capital development in relevant fields, and with over 300 bursaries already awarded to students from around the continent, has been a scientific boon for South Africa and other African countries.“With the equipment already developed and built, South Africa has proven its scientific capability,” he said, “and has shown that it is a country that can play a pioneering role in science.”When complete, the SKA will comprise some 3 000 radio antennae, spread out over a vast area of Southern Africa. South Africa will host the core of the array, comprising about half the dishes, and it and eight partner countries in the region will accommodate the remainder.The first astronomical observations, expected in 2019, will help to answer long-standing questions such as the formation of the universe; why it’s expanding; the possibility of life on other planets; and the mystery of dark energy and dark matter.Ground-breaking technologyAt the isolated Northern Cape site which has been set aside for the SKA, an array of seven dishes is already operational – this is the Karoo Array Telescope, or KAT-7.The KAT-7 is a precursor to the larger 64-dish MeerKAT array, which itself is a precursor to the SKA.A ground-breaker in its own right, KAT-7 is the first radio telescope to consist of fibreglass dishes.These were produced on-site from a mould, and the same manufacturing facility will be expanded to accommodate the larger MeerKAT dishes, using local ingenuity and skills.MeerKAT is Afrikaans, meaning “more KAT”, but is also the name of an endearing little mongoose-like mammal that is indigenous to the Northern Cape and other Southern African regions.When completed in 2018, MeerKAT will be among the five largest radio telescopes in the world.Hanekom stressed that the MeerKAT construction will go ahead, whether or not the SKA is awarded to South Africa.“Great astronomy work will be done, with or without the SKA,” he said.Hanekom also said that the knowledge that has already been amassed is invaluable, and that the project has given rise to a new generation of scientists. The unprecedented scientific opportunities are expected to keep South African talent in the country, and attract expertise from overseas.The KAT-7 has caused much excitement in the local astronomy community with the capture of images of the Centaurus A galaxy and its associated black hole, located 14-million light years from Earth.But scientists are looking further ahead, and are queuing up to book research time on MeerKAT, which will be the largest radio telescope in the southern hemisphere. Already five years’ worth of observation time have been allocated to ten research projects, ranging from a study of radio pulsars to a high-frequency survey of the galactic plane.South Africa leading the wayProfessor Justin Jonas, SKA associate director for science and engineering, and head of Rhodes University’s physics and electronics department, is excited about the opportunities that lie ahead.He said that astronomy has been identified by the government as one of the fields in which South Africa is likely to succeed, because of geographic, natural and knowledge advantages.“We must have aspirations for cutting-edge science,” he said, “or we will always be viewed as a second-class nation.”Jonas said that South Africa’s government is wholly committed to the SKA and its related projects. The African Union has also stated its support for the project, and it is hoped that this will be one of a number of factors that gives South Africa an edge over Australia.The government has declared the entire Northern Cape province to be an astronomy advantage area, through the Astronomy Geographic Advantage Act of 2007. The only exemption is the Sol Plaatje Municipality, which encompasses Kimberley.Within the province, an area of 12.5 million hectares was proclaimed a radio astronomy reserve, and anyone entering must switch off their mobile and other electronic devices. Survey results show that the reserve is one of the quietest environments on earth, in terms of radio frequency, for radio astronomy. This makes it an ideal location for the sensitive SKA.The legislation means that any development that might interfere with the reception of radio signals must first be carefully considered.This high-level support has enabled South African scientists to leap ahead of their international colleagues in areas such as rapid prototyping.“For example, with our dishes we can now go from an engineering diagramme to an on-site antenna in less than a year,” said Jonas.Innovations in astronomy, he said, are helping to drive development in other industries.He mentioned another significant South African achievement – the second-generation Roach board, designed and produced locally.Roach is the reconfigurable open architecture computing hardware board that can be adapted to all kinds of digital signal processing requirements, including medical or telecommunications applications.“Roach 1 is now being used in every radio telescope in the world,” said Jonas. ”It can replace an entire rack of computers, and use a twentieth of the energy.”Because the development team has released the Roach design under an open source licence, the plans can be freely downloaded and used for an increasing number of applications, while the international development community grows.“The software is the key to getting the most out of Roach,” said Jonas.The KAT-7 uses Roach 1, but MeerKAT will most likely use Roach 3. Roach 1 was developed in collaboration with engineers from the University of California, Berkeley.last_img read more

New publication helps recognize pesticide drift

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A new Purdue Extension publication examines the causes and effects of pesticide drift.Pesticide drift occurs when chemicals used to manage weeds or insects are blown or carried off target by wind during application, posing a potential risk to people, animals and plants on neighboring properties.Pesticide drift can happen in both residential and agricultural settings and under all types of weather conditions, even if wind speeds are low, said Fred Whitford, director of the Purdue Pesticide Programs and one of the authors of Options for Dealing with a Pesticide Drift Incident.“Whether it’s a next-door neighbor or a farmer who owns the field adjacent to your property, they have the legal right to apply pesticides to their property,” Whitford said. “However, pesticide applicators also have the legal obligation to keep those products on their side of the property line.”According to the publication, some crop damage attributed to drift might be the result of other factors, such as insect infestations, plant diseases or weather conditions. The authors say it is important to find out what actually caused the damage before reporting a possible drift incident.“Purdue Extension educators can help you determine the cause of injury symptoms,” the publication says. “The educators will look for any possible explanations for the damage, including nutrient deficiencies, insect, weed and disease problems, improper planting and cultivation practices and environmental conditions.”Readers will also learn about the steps for reporting a possible drift incident and what actions could be taken if a drift incident is confirmed.Whitford’s co-authors are Michael O’Donnell, an Extension educator in Delaware County; Roy Ballard, an Extension educator in Hancock County; and Joe Becovitz, an agent with the Purdue-based Office of the Indiana State Chemist.The publication can be downloaded as a free PDF from Purdue’s The Education Storeat https://edustore.purdue.edu/item.asp?Item_Number=PPP-110#. Single printed copies are also available at no cost.last_img read more

Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Commission: Special meeting notice

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Notice is now given that a special meeting of the Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Commission will be held on Aug. 30, 2018 at 10:30 a.m. at the Ohio Department of Agriculture, Auditorium, Bromfield Building, 8995 E. Main St., Reynoldsburg, Ohio, for the following purpose:The Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Commission, Western Lake Erie Basin Watershed In Distress task-force/subcommittee will meet to evaluate the recommendation for declaring eight watersheds within the Western Lake Erie Basin as watersheds in distress.The Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Commission is a seven-member commission which ensures Ohio counties are served by effectively administered and adequately supported soil and water conservation districts.The meeting is open to the public.last_img read more

Customer Service Tips for Early Stage Startups

first_imgdana oshiro A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Few companies put as much effort into customer service as they do into member acquisition. However, in order to retain members, community-driven startups need to be conscious of the entire customer experience. No stranger to support techniques, Zendesk CEO Mikkel Svane spends most of his time perfecting the end-user experience for his clients. Best known for its web-based help desk services, Zendesk launched in 2008 and even then ReadWriteWeb gave the company a favorable review. In 2009, Zendesk continues to establish itself as a great alternative to the traditional call center experience. Svane offers some helpful tips for our ReadWriteStart readers. Says Svane, “The good news for businesses starting out today is that the web offers a whole host of easy, affordable tools that can help to ensure businesses have a meaningful dialogue [with their customers].” Some of those tools include: 1. Web-hosted Solutions: Rather than investing in an in-house legacy customer support service, Svane advises startups to consider a web-based help desk product to eliminate any headaches associated with security, scalability, and ongoing maintenance. Says Svane, “Keep the human touch in-house but outsource the infrastructure.” In addition to Zendesk, companies can look at services like Openbravo for web-based support. 2. Crowdsource Solutions: In addition to a Frequently Asked Questions page, consider incorporating a discussion forum or dialogue tool into your website. These tools allow customers with questions to interact with your best advocates. In addition to Zendesk’s forum tool, companies can also look to Get Satisfaction, FixYa or Lefora for help. 3. Social Media: When your customers or ex-customers are going to complain about your company, they’ll often do it via Twitter or Facebook. Take advantage of these tools and use them to keep a positive conversation going. Having a dedicated staff person that interacts with customers to answer their urgent questions on Twitter shows how responsive and committed a company is to its customers. Related Posts Tags:#start#startups center_img 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more