Stakes win for Bridgmohan

first_imgNEW ORLEANS, Louisiana (CMC):Jamaican jockey Shaun Bridgmohan made virtually all the running aboard favourite Cash Control to capture the US$60,000 Tiffany Lass Stakes at Fair Grounds here last Saturday.Cash Control grabbed the lead outside the five-eighths pole after fighting Bridgmohan made her running along the rails before easily fending off her challengers in the stretch to reach the wire 2-1/2 lengths clear in a time of one minute, 43.07 seconds. The victory was her third straight but first added money score.Bridgmohan said he realised the four-year-old bay filly wanted the lead from the break and he complied.”She was very determined wanting to go, so I dropped my hands and let her do her thing,” he said.Bridgmohan narrowly missed out on another stakes triumph when he finished second by a nose aboard favourite Twirling Cinnamon as 5-1 chance Taylors Angiel won the $60,000 Sugar Bowl Stakes.last_img read more

CARNDONAGH HIT WITH UP TO 19 JOB LOSSES

first_imgInishowen has been hit with the closure of two local businesses with a total loss of 19 jobs.CarndonaghJJ Kelly’s Supermarket close last Saturday night in Carndonagh after being open for 50 years.The supermarket and bakery, owned by JJ and Mary Kelly, has closed with a loss of 15 jobs. And the local O2 phone shop, which was taken over by Three, is also threatened with closure.CARNDONAGH HIT WITH UP TO 19 JOB LOSSES was last modified: May 12th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CarndonaghdonegalJJ Kellys supermarketlast_img read more

SA banks’ governance ‘sound’

first_img13 May 2003The Reserve Bank is happy about the “positive” report from an independent review on corporate governance of the five largest banking groups in the country – Absa, FirstRand Bank Holdings, Investec, Nedcor and Standard Bank.Reserve Bank Deputy Governor Gill Marcus said the review, released in Pretoria on Tuesday, found that the corporate governance of the banking groups was “sound and that no serious breaches existed”.“It’s a very positive report. It points out that our banking groups’ boards are healthy and have a level of independence required to fulfill their roles,” Marcus said.The review was conducted by JK Myburgh and commissioned by the Registrar of Banks, Christo Wiese, last year. The review’s terms of reference were to broadly evaluate the standard of corporate governance applied by the banks, with the premise that corporate governance is an essential element of a healthy risk-management process crucial to the banking business.In this regard, the review found the banks to be committed to adhering to and applying high standards of corporate governance.“Acting on the advice of specialists on corporate governance, the banks on their own initiative from time to time review their corporate governance to ensure compliance with accepted governance principles,” the report said.However, vigilance was still required to ensure continued compliance with standards of governance, which were constantly evolving in South Africa and internationally, Myburgh said.Wiese said it was encouraging to note that risk-management processes in the relevant banks had become more quantitative, which reflected not only enhanced ability to process data, but also the application of improved techniques for the measurement and management of risk.Myburgh’s report recommended, however, that banks should reduce the number of board members, as “smaller boards are more cohesive and work more effectively than large boards”.He recommended that boards should consist of no more than 16 members instead of the current norm of 24 or 25 members.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Gallery: The untamed Northern Cape

first_imgIt’s the largest and hottest province in South Africa, taking up a full third of the country’s land area. But the Northern Cape is also wild and empty, mostly desert and semi-desert. Under 2% of South Africa’s people live there.The 60-metre Augrabies Falls on the Orange River. The original Khoikhoi inhabitants named the falls “Ankoerebis”, or “place of big noises”. Later Afrikaner settlers then derived the name “Augrabies”. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Mary AlexanderIt’s September. It’s spring in South Africa – and Tourism Month, celebrated this year with the theme “Tourism for All”.To inspire your next road trip we bring you nine galleries, one for each province, showcasing our country’s remarkable beauty and diversity.A thriving tourism industry means South Africa is closer to achieving its National Development Plan goals of skills development and creating decent employment through inclusive economic growth.The vast wilderness of the Nortern Cape holds weird lunar landscapes, exotic plants and animals, the Richtersveld World Heritage site and the Big Hole diamond mine, possibly the largest hand-dug excavation in the world.In early spring the barren Namaqualand sees a sudden, brief and brilliant bloom of flowers carpeting the landscape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Sister Januar outside the Catholic Cathedral in the Northern Cape town of Pella. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Arri Raats, a member of the Khomani San Bushmen, at Boesmansrus camp in the Kalahari. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Canoeing on the Orange River at sunset in Vioolsdrift, in the Richtersveld region of the Northern Cape. The Orange is the longest river in South Africa, rising in the Drakensberg mountains in Lesotho and flowing westwards to empty in the Atlantic Ocean. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Brilliantly coloured Augrabies flat lizards are endemic to the Northern Cape, and common on the granite walls of Augrabies Falls National Park. In summer they delight tourists with their acrobatic leaps to catch black flies swarming near the falls. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)A seal colony on the rocky shores of the Namaqua National Park. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Crafts for sale at a tourist market in Pofadder, Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Donkey cart drivers in Andriesvale in the Kalahari. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Arnie Braam in Klein Pella, Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Desert dunes in Witsand – “white sands” – Nature Reserve near Postmasburg in the Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)A farm in Vioolsdrift. Irrigation from the great Orange River and from groundwater allows farmers to produce crops in the desert. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Quiver trees – kokerboom in Afrikaans – in the Kalahari. San Bushman hunter-gatherers used the trees to make quivers for their arrows. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The Sutherland Observatory on a starry night. There is little light pollution in the remote Northern Cape, making the province ideal for major international astronomy initiatives such as the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) and the Square Kilometre Array, or SKA. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Meerkats in the desert of the Kalahari Red Dune Route in the Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)An old shipwreck rusts into the shore of the Namaqua National Park on the West Coast. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Inside the McGregor Museum, an important cultural and natural history research institute, in Kimberley, the capital of the Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Palm trees against the late afternoon sun in Klein Pella, on the banks of the Orange River. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The mountainous desert landscape of the Richtersveld. The region is the only arid biodiversity hotspot on earth, with an amazing variety of plant, bird and animal life. The Richtersveld Cultural and Botanical Landscape is a Unesco World Heritage site. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The Big Hole in Kimberley, the capital of the Northern Cape, is thought to be the largest hand-dug excavation in the world. Once an open-pit diamond mine, some three metric tons of diamonds were extracted from the hole – displacing 22-million tons of earth – between 1872 and 1914. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)A massive communal sociable weaver bird’s nest envelops an acacia tree in the Kgalakgadi Transfrontier Park in the north of the Northern Cape. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)Steenbok amid indigenous desert vegetation in the Namaqua National Park. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)The local maritime museum in the West Coast town of Port Nolloth. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)A dog sits with its driver as they make their way through Vioolsdrift in the Richtersveld. (Image: South African Tourism, CC BY 2.0, via Flickr)last_img read more

Choosing the Direction in Which You Are Being Pulled

first_imgHoward Schultz, the Chairman, and CEO of Starbucks is stepping down from his role as CEO. He is doing so for the following two reasons: first, he wants to lead the development of a new offering, and second, he wants to do more with Starbucks’ social responsibility programs.Pulled Apart at the SeamsWhat is this new offering? It’s a $12.00 cup of coffee. The coffee is going to be brewed from spectacularly rare beans and in very small batches. This $12.00 cup of coffee is also going to be brewed differently, like some kind of fusion brew, or something.At the very same time that this story is making news, it is also being reported that Amazon.com was responsible for 31 percent of all Thanksgiving weekend spending online. If you are a retailer, you felt a sharp pain in your heart. Bezos is the alpha predator, the Great White shark, and he is chomping up everything in sight.What does this mean for you and me? Here is my take. Markets are being torn in two. Literally.Things that can be made more transactional are being pulled sharply in that direction. Amazon.com believes that retailers don’t add a lot of value to most purchases and that people prefer the convenience of buying what they want and having it delivered straight to their doorstep (in some cases, the same day).Who is suffering because of Amazon’s ascendance? Walmart. The problem with a transactional model now is that technology can enable competitors to be even more transactional.Don’t lose hope here; stay wth me. For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction.Where greater value can be created, things are being sharply pulled in that direction. I pay $2.35 for a large cup of Starbucks coffee. I have paid for their special reserve coffees. Coffee is one of my very favorite things on Earth, and I believe that it is worth paying more for that experience. Many of you will read this newsletter on an Apple device, one that had a higher price than the alternatives available to you.There is a market for people who will pay for something much better than average. There are people who want to pay more for something exceptional. The people willing to pay more in one area may choose to transact in other areas.This is important because most of us aren’t going to benefit by trying to be more transactional. If you think it is difficult to win clients with a higher price, try winning clients when you are not different than your competitors. More still, trying running a business with razor thin margins. Being exceptional in some way that is meaningful to the clients you serve is a better–and safer–long term strategy.What makes you worth paying more to obtain?Which way are you being pulled, and what does that mean for your future?last_img read more

Pumaren wants better decision-making from UE after 2nd loss

first_imgUE went just 1-of-4 in uncontested field goals while FEU was far better going 11-of-15.Passing was also a thorn on the Red Warriors’ game tallying just 19 assists as compared to FEU’s 26. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIES For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo Phoenix trial begins for NBA players accused of assault NATO’s aging eye in the sky to get a last overhaul Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next MOST READ View comments Trump signs bills in support of Hong Kong protesters Pumaren rued his team’s reliance on isolation plays instead of finding open shots and executing extra passes.“I was telling them to move the ball, don’t force shots, and I told them even after our game against NU [National University],” said Pumaren, whose team lost 86-69 against the Bulldogs in the opener.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSBoxers Pacquiao, Petecio torchbearers for SEA Games opening“It’s fine with me if you dribble and try to attack your man, go ahead, but if you’re just going to dribble the basketball and you know there are no stats in basketball that says ‘most number of dribbles.’”In their game against the Bulldogs, the Red Warriors went 4-of-8 on uncontested shots and that mark was worse against the Tamaraws. Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netAfter starting the season with two straight losses, University of the East head coach Derrick Pumaren wants a stronger mental game from his players.The Red Warriors dropped to 0-2 after losing to Far Eastern University, 90-83, in the UAAP Season 80 seniors’ basketball tournament at Smart Araneta Coliseum Wednesday.ADVERTISEMENT Celebrity chef Gary Rhodes dies at 59 with wife by his side Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claimlast_img read more