Teams get down to the nitty gritty

first_imgBy BEN HARRISSydney Rebels got win number 34 but only just.The three-time defending mixed open champions were pushed to the edge by ACT Pirates on day two of the 2014 X-Blades National Touch League at Coffs Harbour.After racking up consecutive win number 33 by downing North Queensland Tropical Cyclones 9-4, the Rebels had to dig deep to defeat the Pirates 12-11 in round four.Rebels lead Pool A by four points and will meet second-placed Sydney Mets on day three.The Pirates and Cyclones are third and fourth followed by Hunter Western Hornets and Japan.In Pool B, Brisbane City Cobras are five from five and lead the group.South Queensland Sharks were circling the Cobras as the two teams were undefeated, however last year’s runners-up hammered their southern neighbours 12-3 to go it alone on top.Behind the Sharks are Sunshine Coast Pineapples in third and Northern Eagles in fourth. They are followed by Northern Territory, Defence Warriors and Sydney Scorpions.Five Queensland sides dominate the men’s T-League division.South Queensland Sharks (A) lead Pool A and Brisbane City Cobras are in front in Pool B.But closing the gap are Central Queensland Bulls and Sunshine Coast Pineapples – both in Pool A – and South West Queensland Swans in Pool B.Rebels and Scorpions are the only NSW sides putting up a fight to the Queenslanders while the international teams, Japan and Papua New Guinea, continued to impress.It’s tight in Pool A of the women’s T-League division with Hornets, Swans, Cobras, Victoria and Northern Territory all within eight points of each other.It is a little spread out in Pool B with Scorpions and South Australia leading the way.The Sharks remain unbeaten following six matches of the men’s 30s division.They are in front of Pineapples, Hornets and Scorpions.Scorpions have their own problems as ACT and Sydney Mets are on the same points as Scorpions but behind on percentages.Swans finished on top in the women’s 35s and will play the winner of the Hornets-Pirates preliminary final match.Cyclones and Northern Territory play in the other preliminary final with the loser eliminated from the title race.Scorpions and Sharks are equal on points in the men’s 40s but the Sydney side has a game up their sleeve.Defence Warriors are third, and Hornets and Cyclones are in a battle for fourth spot.Scorpions will be hard to beat in the women’s 40s after winning all their round matches.They will meet Hornets or Northern Eagles in a qualifying final tomorrow. Western Tigers take on ACT in the other qualifying final.Men’s 45s seems to be a two-horse race with Scorpions and Hornets undefeated.The men’s 50s is set to go down to the wire with four points separating the top four.Mets, Pineapples, Sharks and Hornets occupy the top four positions in the division.Eagles, Cyclones and Scorpions will be battling each other for the two spots in the men’s 55s.In the senior mixed, Sharks have all but confirmed their spot in the grand final but the Hornets and Cobras are going head-to-head for the last spot.You can keep up-to-date with all of the latest news and information from the 2014 X-Blades National Touch League in the following ways:Websiteswww.ntl.mytouchfooty.comwww.austouch.com.auSocial MediaFacebook – www.facebook.com/touchfootballaustraliaTwitter – www.twitter.com/touchfootyaus (be sure to use the hashtag #NTL2014)Instagram – www.instagram.com/touchfootballaustraliaYouTube – www.youtube.com/touchfootballausRelated LinksNTL results day twolast_img read more

dAmico Tankers Inks Sale Leaseback Deal for MR Vessel

first_imgzoom Tanker owner and operator d’Amico Tankers has signed a memorandum of agreement and bareboat charter contract for the sale and leaseback of one of its medium-range product tanker vessel for a consideration of USD 28 million.The deal, reached with an undisclosed Japanese company, is related to the 49,990 dwt MT High Discovery, built in 2014 by South Korea’s shipbuilder Hyundai-Mipo.d’Amico Tankers said that the transaction would generate around USD 10.7 million in cash for the company, net of commissions and reimbursement of the vessel’s existing loan, contribute to the liquidity required to complete DIS’ fleet renewal program and allow the company to benefit from the anticipated market recovery.Additionally, d’Amico Tankers will maintain full control of the vessel, since a 10-year bareboat charter agreement was also concluded with the buyer, with a purchase obligation at the end of the tenth year of the charter period. The company has the option to repurchase the tanker starting from the third anniversary of its sale at a competitive cost of funds.last_img read more

Missing Mikmaw woman found alive in Knoxville Tenn expected to return home

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe search for a missing Mi’kmaw woman has ended in Knoxville, Tenn.Chrisma Joy Denny was found alive Sunday after she was reported missing in early November.“Denny is in a safe location and has agreed to stay there,” said the Knox County sheriff’s office in a press release.Police in Knoxville said they’re working with police in Canada to ensure her safe return home.Denny, 23, was reported missing in early November.But no one in her home community of Eskasoni had seen her since early September.Her family has said Denny struggled with addiction and mental illness and often took off on her own. At times, she lived on the streets in Sydney, Cape Breton. So, it wasn’t unusual to not see her for weeks at a time.Early in their investigation, police found out that Denny travelled to the United States. Her last reported sighting was in Tennessee where she had contact with the Knox County sheriff’s office.Officers in Knox County had tried to help Denny. She spent a couple of days at a shelter and was thought to have then moved on.last_img read more

Nordic telco TeliaSoneras overall pay TV base gre

first_imgNordic telco TeliaSonera’s overall pay TV base grew by 43,000 in the fourth quarter to reach 1.3 million, including 600,000 in Sweden. The total number of broadband subscriptions grew by 25,000 during the quarter to reach 2.5 million.TeliaSonera had 643,000 fibre subscribers at the end of 2012, up 23% year-on-year.TeliaSonera recognized a loss of SEK1.6 billion (€186 million) in the fourth quarter from a write-down of goodwill related to its decision to divest Norwegian service provider NextGenTel.last_img read more

The stark cost of illegal downloading and streamin

first_imgThe stark cost of illegal downloading and streaming of movies and TV shows had been laid bare – a whopping US$51.6 billion (€44.5 billion).A report from industry analysis Digital TV Research suggests the amount of revenue lost to piracy has skyrocketed from US$6.7 billion in 2010 to nearly US$31.8 billion last year. The figure will hit nearly US$52 billion in 2022, the Online TV Piract Forecasts report suggests.Digital TV Research’s stats do not include sports or pay TV, making the numbers all the more shocking.A significant uptake in the number of people with Kodi boxes, which make illegal downloading and streaming easier, is evidently a part of the reason for explosion, with the amount of content being produced in television surely another.The US lost the most to online piracy in 2016 – US$8.9 billion – and will remain the most impacted in 2022, when US$11.6 billion is predicted to disappear.Piracy in China, which is already the second-most affected with a US$4.2 billion loss in 2016, will rocket up to US$9.8 billion by 2022.On a more positive note, actions taken by Chinese authorities will see legitimate revenues versus piracy switch from a US$1.2 billion deficit in 2016 to a surplus of US$2.4 billion in five years’ time.By 2018, Asia Pacific will have overtaken North America as the largest region for online piracy, with its losses nearly doubling between 2016 and 2022, ending on nearly US$20 billion.The spread of piracy is not restricted to the region, however. The top five territories in 2016 in terms of losses (see graph) represented 63% of the total, but this will fall to just 55% in 2022. Moreover, eight territories will record losses of more than US$1 billion, double the figure last year.Digital TV Research suggests emerging economies such as India and Brazil will be among the most damaged by piracy in the next five years, with the former seeing its US$700 million losses in 2016 grow to US$3.1 billion. Brazil will add another US$1.1 billion in losses over the same period.Simon Murray, principal analyst at Digital TV Research, was positive about the future of content revenue protection, despite the predictions“Piracy will never be eradicated,” he said. “However, it is not all bad news. Piracy growth rates will decelerate as more effective government action is taken and as the benefits of legal choices become more apparent.”“Legitimate revenues from OTT TV episodes and movie overtook online piracy losses as far back as 2013. The gap between the two measures is widening.”Read an in-depth report on the impact of piracy on the TV and film businesses herelast_img read more

New approach could lead to precise treatments for traumatic brain injury

first_img Source:https://www.ninds.nih.gov/News-Events/News-and-Press-Releases/Press-Releases/Every-cell-has-story-tell-brain-injury Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 5 2018Traumatic head injury can have widespread effects in the brain, but now scientists can look in real time at how head injury affects thousands of individual cells and genes simultaneously in mice. This approach could lead to precise treatments for traumatic brain injury (TBI). The study, reported in Nature Communications, was supported by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), part of the National Institutes of Health.”Instead of clustering responses according to categories of cells in TBI, we can now see how individual cells in those groups react to head injury,” said Patrick Bellgowan, Ph.D., program director at NINDS.University of California, Los Angeles professors Fernando Gomez-Pinilla, Ph.D. and Xia Yang, Ph.D., along with their colleagues, used a novel method known as Drop-seq to closely look at individual brain cells in the hippocampus, a region involved in learning and memory, after TBI or in uninjured control animals. Drop-seq allows thousands of cells and genes to be analyzed simultaneously. Its creation was in part funded by the NIH’s Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative.”These tools provide us with unprecedented precision to pinpoint exactly which cells and genes to target with new therapies,” said Dr. Yang. “Another important aspect to this study was the highly collaborative and multidisciplinary nature of the work. Lots of people, from many different scientific areas, made this study possible.”In one set of experiments the team looked at TBI’s effects on gene expression activity in individual cells. They found that certain genes were upregulated or downregulated across many different cell types, suggesting these genes may play important roles in TBI. Some of these genes are also known to be involved in diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, which may help explain how TBI can be a risk factor for other disorders. For example, Drs. Yang and Gomez-Pinilla’s groups observed altered activity in genes that are involved in regulating the amyloid protein, which builds up in Alzheimer’s.Related StoriesMercy Medical Center adds O-arm imaging system to improve spinal surgery resultsResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaIn particular, the genomic analysis revealed that the activity of the Ttr gene, which is involved in both thyroid hormone transport and scavenging of amyloid protein in the brain, was increased in many cells following TBI, suggesting the thyroid hormone pathway may be a potential target for therapy. Drs. Gomez-Pinilla and Yang’s teams treated animals with the thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4) 1 and 6 hours after brain injury and saw that they performed much better on learning and memory tasks compared to animals that received a placebo.The team identified 15 clusters of cells based on gene activity, including two clusters, named Unknown1 and Unknown2, the cells of which had not been described previously in the hippocampus. Further analysis of these clusters revealed that the cells in the Unknown1 group were involved in cell growth and migration and the cells in Unknown2 were involved in cell differentiation during development. The findings in this study also reveal that although two cells may have similar structure and shape, their functions, as suggested by the analysis of gene activity, may differ.”We now know the secret life of single cells, including how they coordinate with other cells and how vulnerable they are to injury,” said Dr. Gomez-Pinilla. “In addition, seeing which types of genes, including genes involved in metabolism, were involved across many cell types helps identify processes that may be critical in TBI.”Future studies will examine how TBI affects cells in areas other than the hippocampus. In addition, more research is needed to learn about long-term effects of TBI. Analyzing individual cells and genes may identify potential therapies for TBI.last_img read more

Study shows benefits of new spinal fusion surgical home pathway

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 9 2018A standardized care pathway for children with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis undergoing spinal fusion surgery reduces the need for opioid pain medications and shortens hospital stays at Children’s National Health System.The outcomes were reported in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. The study measured the impact of a new spinal fusion surgical home pathway that delivers coordinated, comprehensive care for every patient without increasing costs.The study is the first of its kind to show that the benefits of this unique care pathway, which was mapped and designed at Children’s National using the Six Sigma LEAN process, are sustainable and repeatable over a longer period of time, and have been maintained longer than any other pediatric spinal fusion care model to date.Related StoriesNew network for children and youth with special health care needs seeks to improve systems of careTen-fold rise in tongue-tie surgery for newborns ‘without any real strong data’Revolutionary gene replacement surgery restores vision in patients with retinal degeneration”Our primary goal was to improve the value of care for children with scoliosis and their families,” says Matthew Oetgen, M.D., chief of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine at Children’s National and study lead author. “Even better, we’ve shown that this model can be used consistently over time to maintain the benefits it delivers to this patient population.”The team conducted a retrospective analysis of prospective data from all patients (213) undergoing posterior spinal fusion at Children’s National Health System from 2014 to 2017, a period of time that captures nearly one year before implementation of the new pathway and 2.5 years after implementation.As pressure builds to increase the value of care, many hospital systems are trying standardized care pathways for many complex conditions, in an effort to decrease care variability, improve outcomes and decrease cost. Previous research has shown the effectiveness of a variety of standardized pathways with wide-ranging goals for spinal fusion procedures, however, most published studies have focused only on the initial success of these pathways. This study is the first to look at the implementation over a period of two-and-a-half years to gauge whether the process and its effectiveness could be maintained long term.The authors attribute physician buy-in across disciplines and strict adherence to pathway processes as key to the success of this model. In addition, the team created standardized educational procedures for onboarding new care providers and implemented standardized electronic order sets for both orthopaedic and anesthesia services to make the pathway easy to maintain with little deviation over time. Lean process mapping at the outset included a broad group of care providers who established a collaborative environment that empowered and engaged the entire team to take ownership over the new process.”We used proven business models for culture change that were critical to the success of this program,” Oetgen says. “We’re proud of the model we have created and think it would work well in other pediatric hospitals with similar patient populations.” Source:https://childrensnational.org/news-and-events/childrens-newsroom/2018/surgical-home-program-for-spinal-fusion-achieves-long-term-successlast_img read more

Zinc could help develop new nonantibiotic treatment for bacterial diseases

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Mar 9 2019New details about the role of zinc in our immune system could help the development of new non-antibiotic treatment strategies for bacterial diseases, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs).UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide with about 150 million cases each year, and can lead to serious conditions such as kidney infection and sepsis.A team of cross-institutional University of Queensland researchers led by Professor Matt Sweet, Professor Mark Schembri and Dr Ronan Kapetanovic examined how our immune system uses zinc to fight uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) – the major cause of UTIs.Dr Kapetanovic, from UQ’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB), said researchers already knew that zinc was toxic to bacteria.”We confirmed by direct visualization that cells in our immune system known as macrophages deploy zinc to clear bacterial infections,” Dr Kapetanovic said.Related StoriesStudy: Surveillance for antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues to be core focus for healthcare facilitiesNatural antibiotic made by Tübingen researchers interacts with human defense mechanismsCannabis ingredient shows promise as potential antibiotic for superbugsThey also discovered that UPEC has a two-pronged strategy to survive the body’s immune response.”We found that, compared to non-pathogenic bacteria, UPEC can evade the zinc toxicity response of macrophages, but these bacteria also show enhanced resistance to the toxic effects of the zinc.”These findings give us clues to how our immune system battles infections, and also potential avenues to develop treatments, such as blocking UPEC’s escape from zinc to make it more sensitive to this metal.”Treatment strategies that don’t use antibiotics have the advantage of bacteria not developing resistance; if we can reprogram our immune cells to make them stronger, or change the way they respond to bacteria, we would be better equipped to fight superbugs.”UQ’s School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences Dr Minh Duy Phan said the study also identified the full set of UPEC genes that provide protection against zinc toxicity.”This knowledge provides another potential avenue for developing antimicrobial agents for the treatment of UTIs”, Dr Phan said.IMB PhD student Miss Claudia Stocks said the methods the team used could be applied to the study of other bacterial diseases, not just UTIs.”Macrophages deploy zinc toxicity against several types of bacteria, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Salmonella and Streptococcus, that aren’t necessarily being cleared from the body by normal mechanisms,” Miss Stocks said.”We developed zinc sensors that can be adapted to study different types of bacteria, bringing us closer to understanding our immune system better and creating therapies for a range of infectious diseases.”Source: http://www.uq.edu.au/last_img read more

Researchers uncover largescale brain patterns and networks which control sleep

first_img Source:http://www.au.dk/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 22 2019An international study headed by researchers from Aarhus University has for the first time uncovered the large-scale brain patterns and networks in the brain which control sleep, providing knowledge which in the future may can in the long term help the many Danes large proportion of people who experience problems sleeping.We spend approximately. one-third of our life asleep and our sleep has fascinated researchers for many years. Research from the Center for Music in the Brain at Aarhus University and the University of Oxford has now revealed, in unprecedented detail, the patterns and networks used by the brain during sleep. The researchers have used a technique called functional MRI together with algorithms that can identify brain activity patterns.”This provides a new and potentially revolutionary understanding of brain activity during sleep which can in turn lead to new forms of treatment of the sleep problems that affect far too many people,” explains postdoc at the Center for Music in the Brain at Aarhus University, Angus Stevner, who is behind the study.The results have just been published in Nature Communications.”Our results can change the way in which we understand sleep and, not least, the way we look at sleep disorders such as insomnia. We hope to be able to utilize this new and detailed categorization of sleep to identify changes in the brain activity of people suffering from certain with unexplained sleep disorders, such as dyssomnia or insomnia, which we currently cannot explain” explains states Angus Stevner.Can help with sleep problemsSleep has traditionally been divided into four stages which all produce different brain waves as a result of the brain’s electrical activity, ranging from light sleep – the first stage – to deep sleep and the special REM (rapid eye movement) sleep, and back again.Related StoriesUnpleasant experiences could be countered with a good night’s REM sleepPosterior parietal cortex plays crucial role in making decisions, research showsResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repair”This way of dividing sleep into stages is really based on historical conventions, many of which date back from to the 1930s. We’ve come up with a more precise and detailed description of sleep as a higher number of brain networks which change their communication patterns and dynamic characteristics during sleep,” says Angus Stevner.Almost half of the Danish population experience sleep problems. The researchers hope that a more complete and detailed representation of how the brain’s networks changes during sleep can help them develop better models of the role played by sleep.New knowledge about brain activity while we sleep”At the moment we lack a consistent understanding of what’s happening in the brain of someone suffering from insomnia, but also of the role sleep has in mental disorders, where sleep disorders are all-pervadingextremely common,” says the researcher.In recent years, progress made in modern brain scanning techniques has led to a far more nuanced understanding of the brain’s complexity, which the traditional sleep stages do not take into account.”Our results provide a modern description of human sleep as a function of the brain’s complex network activities and we’re trying to move on from the somewhat simplified picture that has thus far characterized our understanding of brain activity during sleep,” he says.last_img read more

Orbitz says legacy travel site likely hacked affecting 880K

This Feb. 12, 2015 file photo shows signage for travel booking site Orbitz outside the building that houses its headquarters, in Chicago. Orbitz says a legacy travel booking platform may have been hacked, potentially exposing the personal information of people that made purchases between Jan. 1, 2016 and Dec. 22, 2017. The company said Tuesday, March 20, 2018, about 880,000 payment cards were impacted. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato, File) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further Citation: Orbitz says legacy travel site likely hacked, affecting 880K (2018, March 20) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-orbitz-legacy-platform-hacked.html Orbitz says one of its older websites may have been hacked, potentially exposing the personal information of people who made purchases online between Jan. 1, 2016 and Dec. 22, 2017. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. The current Orbitz.com website was not involved in the incident. Orbitz is now owned by Expedia Inc. of Belleview, Washington.Orbitz said Tuesday about 880,000 payment cards were impacted.Data that was likely exposed includes name, address, payment card information, date of birth, phone number, email address and gender. Social Security information was not hacked, however. The company said evidence suggests that an attacker may have accessed information stored on the platform—which was for both consumers and business partners—between Oct. 1, 2017 and Dec. 22, 2017.It said it discovered the data breach March 1.Orbitz is offering those impacted a year of free credit monitoring and identity protection service in countries where available. Orbitz to Go Public, Again read more

Bihar floods Have to eat rats to survive claim locals in affected

first_img Asian News International KatiharJuly 16, 2019UPDATED: July 16, 2019 20:08 IST People of the Dangi Tola village in Katihar district of Bihar are forced to eat rats due to floods. (Representative Image)Locals in Dangi Tola village of Katihar district in Bihar claimed they have no option but to eat rats as floods have wreaked havoc and destroyed houses in the region.Around 300 families have been affected by floods in the area.Speaking to ANI, Talla Murmur, a local, said, “We have to eat rats as our house has been destroyed by the flood. There are no arrangements for us. The government has given no facility to us. We are dependent on rats only to fill our stomachs. All my family members eat rats as they are easy to find in the floods.””I have come here to catch a mouse with my grandfather as we don’t have anything else to eat,” said Murmur’s grandson Vijendra.However, Block Development Officer of Kadwa constituency, Rakesh Kumar Gupta said officials are unaware of the conditions claimed by the locals.”We have no information regarding the condition of the villagers in the flood-affected areas. Even if they are eating rats, maybe it is likely that the tribal people might be eating it,” he said.Meanwhile, Congress MLA Shakeel Ahmad Khan said he has written a letter to Chief Minister Nitish Kumar, requesting him to provide assistance.Bihar is witnessing floods as the water levels of several rivers have been rising following heavy rainfall in the past few days.Many villages of Bihar’s Araria, Darbhanga and Madhubani districts are flooded due to the heavy downpour.ALSO READ | Red alert in Kerala, extremely heavy rains expected as monsoon strengthensALSO WATCH | Assam flood death toll reaches 11, Barpeta worst affected districtFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byKritika Kashyap Tags :Follow biharFollow floodFollow eat ratsFollow Nitish KumarFollow Block Development OfficerFollow congressFollow MLAFollow Darbhanga Next Bihar floods: Have to eat rats to survive, claim locals in affected villageOfficials are unaware of the conditions claimed by the locals, Block Development Officer of Kadwa constituency, Rakesh Kumar Gupta said.advertisementlast_img read more

India signs 74 mn loan pact with World Bank for UttarakhandIndia signs

first_imgUttarakhand COMMENT India has signed a financing loan agreement with the World Bank for USD 74 million for Uttarakhand Workforce Development Project (UKWDP), a finance ministry statement said Tuesday.As per the statement, the project objective is to improve the quality and relevance of training at priority Industrial Training Institutes (ITIs) and to increase the number of labour-market-relevant workers through short-term training in Uttrakhand.The project has three components — improving the quality and relevance of ITI training; increasing the number of skilled workers certified under National Skills Qualification Framework (NSQE); and policy and institutional development and project management. “Twenty-five ITIs have been selected — 13 located in District Centres and 12 ITIs that are well-linked to industries. Two out of four women’s ITIs in the state will be included in the list,” the ministry added.The project has a 5-year grace period, and a maturity of 17 years.The closing date for the project is June, 2023. September 18, 2018 SHARE world bankcenter_img SHARE SHARE EMAIL labour Published on COMMENTSlast_img read more