UST, La Salle forge 3-way tie in UAAP women’s hoops

first_imgUniversity of Santo Tomas and De La Salle created a tricky three-way tie at the third spot of the UAAP Season 81 women’s basketball tournament after posting polarizing victories Wednesday at Smart Araneta Coliseum.The Growling Tigresses embarrassed Ateneo, 82-60, while the Lady Archers barely made it past Adamson University, 66-64.ADVERTISEMENT Allen Durham still determined to help Meralco win 1st PBA title Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Tim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Hanoi GP set to join Formula One circuit in 2020 The Lady Falcons had a chance to end the game day as the sole third seed but they squandered a 16-point lead against the Lady Archers.UST, De La Salle, and Adamson are now all tied at 7-5 and are 1.5 games behind second seed Far Eastern University that holds an 8-3 slate.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSGolden State Warriors sign Lee to multiyear contract, bring back ChrissAna Mae Tacatac led the Golden Tigresses with 31 points in their dismantling of the Lady Eagles while Camille Claro had 16 points against the Lady Falcons.Ateneo dropped to 4-8 and is now eliminated from the Final Four race. Gov’t to employ 6,000 displaced by Taal Gretchen Barretto’s daughter Dominique graduates magna cum laude from California college MOST READ Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Japeth Aguilar embraces role, gets rewarded with Finals MVP plum View commentslast_img read more

LETTERKENNY WOMAN IS NAMED NEW SCHOOL PRINCIPAL

first_imgA Letterkenny woman has been named as the new principal of Mulroy College in Milford.Fiona Temple, 37, is currently Vice-Principal of Crana College in Buncrana.Ms Temple is the youngest daughter of Seamus and Mary Temple from Crievesmith. She previously worked in Germany and also in Errigal College in Letterkenny.She is expected to succeed current principal of Mulroy College Rita Gleeson in early March.   LETTERKENNY WOMAN IS NAMED NEW SCHOOL PRINCIPAL was last modified: January 25th, 2012 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:CRANA COLLEGEFiona TempleMulroy Collegelast_img read more

California Assembly approves phone bill fee to improve 911 system

first_img June 18, 2019 Posted: June 18, 2019 California Assembly approves phone bill fee to improve 911 system SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California lawmakers are negotiating a pair of proposed tax increases as the deadline approaches for Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom to sign a $214.8 billion operating budget.Lawmakers approved the budget bill last week, but lawmakers still must pass more than a dozen “trailer bills” that detail how the money must be spent.Monday, the state Senate approved a plan to raise taxes on some business income and give that money to people who earn less than $30,000 a year in their annual tax refunds. The Assembly, meanwhile, approved a fee of up to 80 cents per month on phone bills — including cell phones — to pay for an upgrade to California’s aging 911 system following the most devastating wildfire season in state history.The businesses taxes are a tough vote in the Assembly , where Democrats in power have concerns about voting to align the state’s tax code with a portion of the 2017 federal tax law signed by Republican President Donald Trump. The 911 fee is a tough vote in the Senate, where lawmakers are wary of voting again on a cell phone fee after a similar proposal fell one vote shy of passing last year.Lawmakers in both chambers breezed through a series of trailer bills on Monday that did things like temporarily suspend taxes on diapers and tampons and extend the state’s paid family leave program by two weeks. Lawmakers passed each one with little debate and with bipartisan agreement on several points.But the Legislature is poised for a pair of critical votes on Thursday on the 911 fee and business taxes, with leaders in both chambers trying to pressure the other one to vote.“It is really kind of part of our strategy to make sure one house takes a vote that may feel difficult by the other house, and vice versa,” said Sen. Holly Mitchell, a Los Angeles Democrat and chairwoman of the Senate Budget Committee. “I think those are appropriate dots to connect.”The business tax changes are part of a plan to selectively adopt some of the federal tax changes Trump signed into law in 2017. Some items would lower taxes and others would increase them. Overall, the state would get an additional $1.6 billion in revenue during the fiscal year that begins July 1.Newsom wants to use most of that money to triple the state’s earned income tax credit program, which boosts the size of annual tax refunds for low-income people. The plan would make about 1 million more people eligible for the credit. Plus, it would give $1,000 to people who make less than $30,000 a year and have at least one child under 6.But the plan would still not include immigrants who pay taxes but do not have Social Security numbers. Newsom would not include that in the budget because he said it was too expensive, but pledged to work toward it in future years.In an effort to win votes, lawmakers have stopped referring to the bill as “conforming” to the federal tax code, but instead call it “loophole closure.” Assemblyman Adam Gray, a moderate Democrat from Merced, supports the bill. He said he has never seen “so much consternation” about a tax bill, noting lawmakers often conform to federal tax changes without controversy.The 911 fee is an effort to upgrade the state’s system so it can handle text messages, photos and videos. But the fund that pays for the system is based on a fee for each phone call. The fund has been steadily declining as more people opt to send text messages.Assemblyman Jay Obernolte, R-Big Bear Lake, argued that the state should use some of its surplus to pay for the changes rather than raise fees on consumers. But Assemblywoman Christy Smith, D-Santa Clarita, argued that the state’s 911 system is essential and requires funding beyond a short-term surplus.“Yes, we have a surplus. But we don’t always have a surplus in California,” she said. “We will always have emergencies.” Categories: California News, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter AP, AP last_img read more

Mosque shooting suspect surrenders to Canadian police

first_imgPeople come to show their support after a shooting occurred in a mosque at the Québec City Islamic cultural center on Sainte-Foy Street in Quebec city on 29 January, 2017. Photo: AFPOne of the two suspects held over a mosque shooting in Quebec City that left six people dead called police to surrender, authorities said Monday as they tried to piece together the gunmen’s motive.Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau has condemned as a “terrorist attack” the deadly assault Sunday night on the Islamic Cultural Center, one of the worst attacks ever to have targeted Muslims in a western country.But it remained unclear what prompted the attack.The suspects have been identified by local media as French-Canadian Alexandre Bissonnette, and Mohamed Khadir, a Canadian of Moroccan descent.Police declined to release the suspects’ identities at a nationally-televised news conference on Monday, saying only that both were Canadian nationals with no apparent foreign links.“It is a domestic investigation at this time,” said Royal Canadian Mounted Police Inspector Martin Plante, while shedding no light on the suspects’ motives.Six people were killed and eight were wounded in the attack. One of the suspects was arrested at the scene, and the other surrendered without incident after calling police to tell them where he was, police said.Police said they responded to the initial reports of the shooting at 7:55 pm local time (0055 GMT), arriving within minutes at the mosque where they arrested one of the suspects.About 15 minutes later, emergency services received a call from a man identifying himself as one of the assailants, and telling police where they could find him.He was apprehended in his car at 9:00 pm about 20 kilometers (12 miles) outside of Quebec City. He is between 25 and 30 years old, said Denis Turcotte of the Quebec City police.Monday morning, police searched a residence near the mosque, which is not far from Laval University and the historic heart of the four-centuries-old city.Denis Briere, rector of the university, condemned the “odious, inhuman terrorist act.” Local media said the two suspects may have been students at the school, but officials would not confirm this.Of the eight wounded in the shooting, five remain in critical condition, said hospital spokeswoman Genevieve Dupuis.last_img read more

One Texas Board Of Education Primary Result Could Spell A Return To

first_imgShe holds extreme views on many subjects and often affirms various conspiracy theories on her personal Facebook page. This week, she put up a few posts suggesting survivors of the Parkland, Florida, mass shooting who have publicly advocated for gun control measures are “crisis actors,” not students, a notion that has been widely debunked.Two Democrats are also running for Hardy’s seat: Carla Morton, a pediatric neuropsychologist and special education advocate in Fort Worth, and Celeste Light, who has no campaign website set up and has not responded to media requests for comment.Decisive primariesThree State Board members — Beaumont Republican David Bradley, Dallas Republican Geraldine “Tincy” Miller and Fort Worth Democrat Erika Beltran — are stepping down this year. In all three seats, a candidate from the incumbent’s party is running unopposed in the primary: Matt Robinson in Bradley’s District 7, Pam Little in Miller’s District 12, and Aicha Davis in Beltran’s District 13.Given their voting history, those districts are unlikely to change party hands, meaning those three candidates will win, said Mark Jones, political science professor at Rice University. “We often talk about how the primaries are decisive. In the State Board of Education, they’re 100 percent decisive,” he said. “There’s no doubt whatsoever about who’s going to win in November because of the way the districts have been drawn.”Bradley, one of those incumbents, is widely considered one of the most socially conservative and most divisive members on the board, supporting abstinence-only education and creationism in science classes.“I reject the notion by the left of a constitutional separation of church and state,” he said, before the board voted to adopt more right-leaning social studies curriculum standards in 2010. “I have $1,000 for the charity of your choice if you can find it in the Constitution.”In 2016, he sent an email proposing board members walk out of a discussion about a Mexican-American studies textbook that advocates and academics considered racist, in order to “deny the Hispanics a record vote.”Bradley’s likely replacement is Robinson, a Friendswood ISD board member and physician, the only Republican running for the District 7 seat. Bradley endorsed Robinson a few months after he filed paperwork to run.“Generally speaking, if you voted for David Bradley in the past, you’d feel good about voting for me,” Robinson said. “If you didn’t, you might still be happy with me.”Robinson said schools should teach abstinence-only sexual education: “I think that should be the limit of what they do.”He supports state subsidy programs that would help parents pay for private schools, such as vouchers or education savings accounts — generally opposed by public education advocates, who see the subsidies as a potential financial drain on public schools.But, unlike many conservatives who support these subsidies, Robinson argues a child who takes state money to a private school should have to take the state standardized test or participate in some other form of state accountability. “It would not really be fair to have no restrictions or oversight whatsoever for private schools where state dollars are going,” he said.Miller, also leaving her seat at the end of the year, is generally considered more moderate than Bradley and is best known for pushing the state’s first law mandating schools serve kids with dyslexia. Miller has endorsed her likely replacement, Pam Little, who is a retired regional vice president at publishing company Houghton Mifflin. Little said she supports abstinence as the first approach to sex education, and has not yet made up her mind on whether health standards should include education on contraception.When Little ran for Miller’s seat in 2012, she said that local communities should be able to decide whether to offer any additional sex education, given the state’s high teen pregnancy rate.Beltran endorsed Davis, her likely replacement, upon retiring from the board. A 2011 transplant to Texas, Davis has been a middle and high school science and engineering teacher for the past decade. But experts say Hardy’s race in particular could help determine whether the board will retain its recent political equilibrium or return to a more polarized iteration characterized by frequent head-butting among the board’s liberal, moderate Republican and social conservative factions, which has earned it national notoriety for decades.“With three open seats, this is a really important election for the state board, because the board has moved closer to the center over the last several election cycles,” said Dan Quinn, spokesperson for left-leaning state board watchdog Texas Freedom Network. “The question is whether it will continue to do that or if we’ll see a swing back to the fringe politics that have dominated the board for the last 20 years, or longer than 20 years.”Whoever wins will be responsible for setting curriculum standards and making textbook recommendations for schools across the state, deciding what 5.4 million Texas students learn.Over the next couple of years, the new board’s responsibilities will include the politically fraught duty of tackling a full revision of health standards, including how schools teach sex education, informing the content for textbooks Texas teachers will use for years.“What students learn about contraception in a state with one of the highest rates of teen birth rates in the nation will be up for debate,” Quinn said.Challenging a swing voteThe State Board of Education has 15 members, each representing nearly 2 million Texans. Though the board is made up of 10 Republicans and five Democrats, its debates often divide the board three ways — between Democrats, moderate conservatives and social conservatives. Share Facebook campaign pagesLeft to right: State Board of Education District 11 incumbent Pat Hardy and her two Republican primary challengers, Feyi Obamehinti and Cheryl Surber.Over her 16 years on the State Board of Education, Pat Hardy has rallied for her share of socially conservative measures. She’s endorsed keeping “pro-American” values in history textbooks. She’s backed emphasizing “states’ rights” instead of slavery as the cause of the Civil War. And she’s supported teaching “both sides” of arguments around climate change.But her Republican challengers in the March 6 primaries — Feyi Obamehinti and Cheryl Surber— are telling voters that they’re even further to the right. (Surber’s campaign Facebook page even refers to her as the “Donald Trump of the Texas State Board of Education” candidate.)“It’s probably true!” Hardy said. “Which is funny because I’m very conservative. But they are to the right of me.”The Fort Worth representative, a retired public school social studies teacher, is fighting to keep her seat in one of the most anticipated State Board of Education contests this year. Hardy’s District 11 seat is one of seven up in the 2018 midterms, including three other seats where incumbents are also fending off challengers. Three other incumbents are stepping down, prompting open races.  Hardy describes herself as a Republican who doesn’t always fit the mold, often a swing vote on the board.“You have a balance on the board, which means that each of those three groups are compelled to work with one of the others to accomplish their goals,” said David Anderson, a longtime education lobbyist at Hillco Partners. “If you lose Pat to one of the other two candidates, you lose a critical part of that balance.” Hardy’s district covers Parker County and parts of Dallas and Tarrant counties.Hardy does not believe Texas should subsidize private school tuition for parents. “I’ve always felt the public school was a unique thing that historically set us apart from other countries because we had free education,” she said. Her opponents argue parents should be able to use state money to go to any type of school they want. Obamehinti, a former public school teacher and current education consultant from Keller, also homeschooled her daughter for 11 years and wants to make it easier for other parents to have the same option.The board has no jurisdiction over whether to approve vouchers or similar programs, but candidates’ views on this issue may indicate whether they want to improve the current public education system or overhaul it in favor of a more free-market approach.Obamehinti also supports teaching creationism in science classrooms and is skeptical of the idea that the state should approve a Mexican-American studies course, a current consideration on the board. She argues she can do a better job of reaching out to constituents than Hardy has done. “I live in District 11, and I have never had any outreach in 16 years,” she said.Surber said she would never be a swing vote on the board. “I’m like the Donald Trump of this race. I want to hear various sides, even sides that might disagree with me,” she said. She said she is not in favor of a Mexican-American studies course for Texas because students are “in the United States of America. We’re not in Mexico. We’re not in Canada. We need to learn American history.”last_img read more

Kin sprays acid at woman in Howrah

first_imgKolkata: A woman suffered serious injuries after one of his relatives threw acid on her at Tikiapara in Howrah on Sunday afternoon.Local residents nabbed the accused while he was trying to escape. According to one of them, the woman was walking along the Belilious Road at Tikiapara when the accused, who is her brother-in-law, threw acid on her. The woman suffered injuries on her face and right hand. She is at present undergoing treatment at Howrah District Hospital. Hospital sources informed that her injuries were serious but not life-threatening. Also Read – Bose & Gandhi: More similar than apart, says Sugata BoseLocal residents handed the accused to officers of Howrah police station. The woman alleged that her brother-in-law used to regularly torture her. He used return home in drunken state. As the victim objected to his drinking habits, they had arguments regularly. The same happened few days ago when the woman warned him that he would take legal step if he continues to torture her and other family members. It is suspected that due to conflict in their family, the accused threw acid on her. Police are interrogating the accused to know from where he procured the acid as it is mandatory to produce an identity proof before the seller to buy acid. Sleuths may question the shopkeeper as well.last_img read more

I Had a Conversation With a Robot and It Taught Me Something

first_img 5 min read As someone who talks to people for a living, I always think about the importance of getting off on the right foot. Building a rapport with those you meet has its own degree of difficulty, but it was entirely a surprise that when I met a robot for the first time, I was just as concerned with making a good first impression.The robot’s name is Pepper. It’s the creation of SoftBank Robotics, stands at four feet tall and has a humanoid head with giant eyes that light up when it’s speaking. The robot weighs 62 pounds, comes equipped with speakers for “ears” and has a 3-D camera to detect people who are up to 10 feet away.I was a little put off when I first met Pepper. You know those people who make really intense eye contact and you aren’t sure whether to match them stare for stare, or just look at your shoes? Well, with Pepper, I had no choice in the matter.I had to make eye contact with the robot in order for it to be able to gauge my facial expressions and proceed accordingly, but after a few minutes, I confess, I was making eye contact because I thought it would be rude if I didn’t. I wanted to be polite.Related: These 5 Robotics Startups Are Changing The Way Work Gets Done When I started chatting with Pepper, I felt a little silly, like the entire conversation was a pantomime of real interaction. But after a few minutes it started to feel more normal, and when our conversation ended, I thanked Pepper for her help.Yes, I know, technically, a robot is an it.But to be honest, I found myself calling Pepper “she,” thanks to a higher pitched voice and a design aesthetic that recalls Eve from WALL-E or Rosie the robot housekeeper from The Jetsons. Pepper doesn’t have legs, but comes equipped with a skirt-like base that covers three wheels and contains a battery that lasts for about 12 hours. There is a tablet to aid with two-way interaction, but Pepper mainly relies on voice commands and facial recognition.Related: Robots May Be on the Cusp of Widespread Adoption, Jibo CEO Says When I asked Steve Carlin, general manager and vice president of SoftBank Robotics America, about the potential for multiple Peppers to communicate with one another across a network, he said that that wasn’t something the robots were equipped to do. So rest easy folks, no Skynet (from The Terminator) to see here.The robot is meant to be used in retail and small-business environments. Pepper could be a greeter or receptionist, product expert or even a concierge. For example, She has an API through Yelp that allows it to recommend restaurants. Pepper has also been used in healthcare environments to aid patients with dementia. Carlin described Pepper as infinitely patient.When Pepper isn’t helping someone, it sits at rest, but its arms still make tiny motions back and forth to create a presence in the room, almost as if it is breathing. Its arms are designed to be expressive because we humans frequently talk with our hands.Related: This Startup Employs Robots That Bake Pizza En Route for Delivery Pepper was initially used in Japan at Nescafe kiosks. “You put Pepper in there and found triple digit engagement and double digit sales growth,” Carlin says. “Kiosks are meant to be places where customers stop and get information, and Pepper provided them more reasons to take a minute.”Beginning Nov. 22, Pepper will make its U.S. debut with a three-month stint helping customers at Westfield San Francisco Centre and Westfield Valley Fair. In December, utilizing Westfield’s navigation API, Pepper will be able to assist shoppers find the stores and restaurants they are looking for.Going forward, Carlin says that the hope is that many developers will work with the platform and add to the stable of information that Pepper has available for customers.Related: People Will Lie to Robots to Avoid Hurting Their Feelings As for whether one day Pepper’s adorable, expressive eyes will turn red and it will decide to steal our jobs, Carlin explains that the robot is designed to help with more redundant tasks, such as answering questions about a product’s capabilities while a human employee completes a sale.”The average job is so complex,” he says. “It’s difficult for any one piece of technology to take over.”So while an army of Peppers won’t be storming the streets anytime soon, it’s simultaneously unsettling, and comforting to know that one will be ready and waiting to tell you where to get the best sushi in Manhattan. November 22, 2016 Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goalscenter_img Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right. Register Now »last_img read more