Man United ace ‘proof you should stick with young players’ – fans love the idea of Smalling being captain

first_img1 Man United v Man City is live on talkSPORT at 2pm on Sunday 25 October.Chris Smalling has had a good season so far.The man fans have christened ‘Mike’ after a slip of the tongue from manager Louis van Gaal has gone from a figure of fun to a mainstay in the United defence.And Van Gaal thinks 25-year-old Smalling has the potential to lead the team when current captain Wayne Rooney and vice skipper Michael Carrick are gone.Here, talkSPORT looks at what fans think about the idea of ‘captain Mike’. Chris Smalling to captain Man United in the future? last_img read more

DUNGLOE LADS GET ON THEIR BIKES FOR MIZEN TO MALIN CYCLE

first_imgThe boys are wheely in good shape – but Myles Sweeney is still looking for a bike!Six local lads from Dungloe are getting into the saddle for the ride of their lives!The lads will cycle from Mizen Head to Malin Head in aid of Our Children’s Hospital in Crumlin starting out on August 12th.Daniel Walsh, Eamon Mc Gee, Paddy Mc Gowan, Myles Sweeney, John O’ Donnell and Gerard Pat Boyle will take to the road for five days and cover over 600kms. They are holding a fundraising cycle on Saturday the 15th of March with a 2pm registration in the Parochial Hall in Dungloe.With 20k and 40k controlled cycles there is something to suit everyone, so get on your bike and support this great cause.Sponsorship cards are available from locations around the town and the lads already have huge support.All Myles Sweeney needs now is a bike although the rumour os that the one-time fine athlete is driving the support car! DUNGLOE LADS GET ON THEIR BIKES FOR MIZEN TO MALIN CYCLE was last modified: March 14th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:cycledonegaldungloefundraisingMizen to Malinlast_img read more

Katrina dead largely unidentified

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 “We know families must be frantic,” said Department of Health and Hospitals spokeswoman Christina Stephens. “We completely understand and are trying to have it move efficiently and quickly, but we have no margin for error. We have to be 100 percent sure before we tell someone a body is their loved one.” Dr. Michael Doberson, an Arapahoe County, Colo., coroner who helped identify victims at the World Trade Center and in Louisiana, said one difference here is that “things are so much more scattered.” “It happened over such a great area so it’s hard to get an idea where or who the people are,” he said. “In 9-11 it was all at one site. There was a place for people to gather and present their plight. You aren’t seeing that now probably because families are scattered and because there’s not just one central place people can go to.” He added: “Something else to consider is that in some cases whole families may have been wiped out and there’s no one left to look for them.” The Sept. 11 victims included many stockbrokers and traders, and their families tended to be well-off and well-connected, with the means to put pressure on public officials and get their story out. They also had the backing of their loved ones’ employers. A large number of the victims in New Orleans were poor and black. NEW ORLEANS – Within weeks of the attack on the World Trade Center, the public knew a lot about many of the Sept. 11, 2001, victims – their families, their jobs, their commute, even some of the intimate details of their final moments. The victims’ families mobilized with remarkable effectiveness to make sure their loved ones were found and their stories told. More than a month after Hurricane Katrina, the vast majority of the nearly 1,000 dead in Louisiana lie anonymously in a morgue – largely because authorities have released only a few dozen names, but also, perhaps, because many of the victims’ families were scattered by the storm and are still picking up the pieces of their lives. There has been no clamor from the victims’ loved ones, little public pressure on officials to release the names of the dead or at least try harder to identify them. Most of the 976 dead in a St. Gabriel morgue remain unidentified, awaiting release to relatives. Hamstrung by lost dental records and the decomposition of bodies that floated in floodwaters and lay in searing heat for days or weeks, officials say an accurate catalog of the dead might be weeks away, or longer. Silas Lee, a New Orleans political analyst and pollster, said that might help explain the lack of pressure to speed up the identification. “Being black and poor may be a part of it, but it may not be exclusively that,” said Lee, who is black. He said he, too, believes the main reason is that everyone has been dispersed all over the country by the storm. As of Thursday in Louisiana, just 73 bodies had been released from the morgue, and the names of only 32 victims had been made public. Up to 60 more bodies were to be released by today. Officials said they are having trouble finding relatives to whom they can release the bodies. At least 267 victims have been tentatively identified, but officials at the morgue are insisting on DNA, fingerprints or dental records before making a positive match, authorities said. “I don’t know if it’s slow or if it’s being done in a deliberate manner, but I know it’s slower than we want,” said Dr. Louis Cataldie, who is heading the body recovery in the region. He said more specialists are expected to arrive next week to assist with the autopsies. Frank Minyard, the Orleans Parish coroner, said his staff working in St. Gabriel is able to do 12 to 15 autopsies a day. “I would estimate we will be here for at least a year,” he said. Both he and Cataldie said the majority of people died of natural causes such as strokes and heart attacks, and far fewer from drowning. Eight people had gunshot wounds, but Minyard said those would not be classified as homicides because the circumstances of the deaths were not known. Minyard said he believes more people committed suicide than many realized, and cited as an example “a guy I know very well” who drank Freon refrigerant after seeing his storm-damaged property. Officials said they have taken nearly 250 DNA samples from family members. But many dental records were ruined by the flood. The identifying of the dead was also slowed for days by Hurricane Rita. And because of criminal investigations, all of the more than 100 bodies recovered from nursing homes and hospitals had to be autopsied. In Mississippi, 196 of the 221 known victims of Katrina have been identified. But tattoos, driver’s licenses and physical characteristics have been used there – means of identification that Louisiana officials say are insufficient by themselves. Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco regards the identification of the dead as a top priority but does not want the process rushed and someone misidentified, spokeswoman Denise Bottcher said. “That is something you do not want to get wrong,” she said. Bottcher also said it is unfair to compare Louisiana with Mississippi, because Mississippi did not have the sustained flooding and advanced decomposition that have complicated the process of identifying the dead in Louisiana. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

NBA Finals: Warriors’ comeback ability faces ultimate test

first_imgOAKLAND – Can the Warriors come back? That’s become a familiar and jarring question as they’ve trailed by double digits for six consecutive games.That comeback curiosity now goes for the Warriors’ three-peat hopes in the NBA Finals.As much as injury woes are impacting this two-time title defense, the Warriors constantly find themselves in need of a rally.They’ve trailed by 17, 18, 17, 12, 12 and 17 dating back to Game 2 of the Western Conference Finals against Portland. And, yet, they are …last_img read more

€60m European boost for SMEs

first_img14 May 2009South Africa’s Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) has secured a €60-million (about R690.9-million) credit line from the European Investment Bank (EIB) to finance viable projects by small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in the industrial, resources and services sectors.EIB vice president Plutarchos Sakellaris said the loan was a strong signal of the bank’s commitment to supporting the private sector and encouraging job creation in South Africa.“Moreover, the bank is confident that by working in partnership with the Industrial Development Corporation we can help to stimulate the South African financial markets by diversifying IDC’s funding base and enhancing the provision of finance to SMEs,” Sakellaris said in a statement this week.‘Opportune time’IDC chief executive Geoffrey Qhena said the credit line could not have come at a more opportune time, when the cost of raising funds was extremely high given market volatility and the liquidity crisis, and would improve access to funding SMEs in the country.“We are particularly pleased that this loan will further enhance our commitment to development finance and addressing market failures,” Qhena said at the signing of the agreement in Johannesburg.“[The Industrial Development Corporation’s] expertise in project evaluation ensures that the EIB funds are directed towards projects which promote economic growth and job creation, as well as being environmentally and socially sustainable.”Lengthy relationshipThe IDC’s relationship with the EIB dates back to the mid-1990s. The EIB has over the years provided the IDC with four credit lines totalling about €165-million for small business development in South Africa.In October 2007, the EIB signed an agreement with the South African government, pledging financial support of up to €900-million the country until 2013.The bank cooperates with the South African authorities, public agencies, private enterprises and the financial sector to focus investment on infrastructure projects of public interest (including municipal infrastructure, power and water supply) and support for the private sector, including small and medium-sized businesses.In 2008, the EIB supported sustainable economic development in South Africa by investing in three projects to the tune of €202.5-million, almost doubling its financing activity compared with €113-million in 2007.SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Nguni Juices: a winning local mix

first_imgCreator of Nguni Juices Norman Mpedi in his factory. Workers collect fruit in the veld for processing. The umviyo fruit is rich in vitamin C and fibre. (Images: Norman Mpedi) MEDIA CONTACTS • Norman Mpedi +27 82 267 3053 umviyo@yahoo.co.ukRELATED ARTICLES • Paying it forward with goat farming • Teaching people to work with nature • South African wine farms invest in biodiversity • SA’s burgeoning berry industry Emily van RijswijckThanks to canny survival skills learnt in the bush, former Umkhonto we Sizwe soldier Norman Mpedi has made a drastic career change and launched successful organic juice manufacturing operation Nguni Juices, using wild indigenous fruit harvested in Limpopo and KwaZulu-Natal.It all started when Mpedi could not find work in the South African National Defence Force following the disbanding of Umkhonto we Sizwe. At this stage he often used to think back to times when he and his fellow comrades survived solely on what was available in the Angolan bush. Sometimes this only amounted to edible wild fruits growing in abundance.He recalls: “We ate this fruit, the umviyo, sometimes for up to three weeks at a time and we survived.”Untapped potentialUmviyo is the isiZulu name for the wild medlar or Vangueria infausta, a wild fruit similar to the better-known marula (Sclerocarya caffra) or Mnguni in isiZulu. Nutritionally, it’s as rich in vitamin C and natural fibre as the latter.In juice form it is an almost unrivalled high-energy natural supplement. Knowing this, Mpedi knew there was untapped potential in this source and started to investigate it further.“No-one had this idea before,” he says.This was back in 2003 and Mpedi began tackling the challenges of researching various indigenous fruits and their potential for juicing, and finding financial assistance for his start-up venture. He also had to register his product and patent his juice with the Companies and Intellectual Property Registration Office.With the help of specialists in the field from the University of Johannesburg and Pretoria, his final product was tested for nutritional quality and taste, and finally given the thumbs-up.“All my products are organic and completely free of chemicals,” says proud Mpedi. His products are currently only available at selected tourist and health shops, at some fruit and vegetable outlets and certain petrol stations.Mpedi is still looking for additional capital to fund expansion.RecognitionIn the meantime, his efforts have not gone unnoticed. In February 2011 Mpedi got a personal mention in Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan’s annual budget speech.Gordhan related how Mpedi, Mlondolozi Kosi – with his ICT training centre in Willowvale in the Eastern Cape, and Antonio Pooe – with Exactech Fraud Solutions in Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban – are small business operators setting an inspiring example for others.“Small businesses are an important source of jobs. Businesses that employ fewer than 50 workers account for 68% of private sector employment,” Gordhan said at the time.Mpedi employs about 12 workers at his factory in Mokopane in Limpopo. As the fruit ripen in summer, his busiest times are from January until March when he employs additional local people to help with harvesting.In 2007 he was a finalist in the small companies category of the Department of Trade and Industry’s Technology Awards, and in 2008 he was recognised by the Industrial Development Corporation for his research on indigenous foods.In the new year Mpedi hopes to branch out into other products, such as alcoholic ciders from the same fruit.In addition to umviyo, he harvests monkey oranges and a plant known as utshwala benyoni, also known as white birds brandy, because when birds eat it they “become very noisy and lively”, Mpedi says.This plant is used as a natural enhancer in the fruit juice as it has a minty flavour.“Next year my business will grow even more, for sure,” he adds.last_img read more

South Africa spends more on education

first_img22 February 2012 South Africa’s spending on education continues to grow, with Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan allocating R207-billion to the sector for 2012/13, with projections that this may rise to up to R236-billion over the next three years. Delivering his Budget speech in Parliament in Cape Town on Wednesday, Gordhan said provincial education spending was expected to grow by 5.9% over the next three years, from R169.9-billion this year to R183.8-billion in 2015.Learner subsidies for no-fee schools The government will further spend over R18-billion of the money towards boosting learner subsidies for no-fee schools and expanded access to Grade R. South Africa’s education authorities say learner performance in literacy and numeracy remains a challenge, as shown by the national assessment of grade 3 and 6 learners conducted last year. The assessments identified problem areas in each school and allowed for tailored interventions to be made, with R235-million set aside in the Budget for this purpose.R850-million for university infrastructure About R850-million has been set aside towards improving the country’s university infrastructure, including student accommodation facilities. The National Student Financial Aid Scheme, which has helped poor students at tertiary institutions with loans, will receive more than R17-billion over the next three years. A Green Paper on Higher Education, released earlier this year, includes commitments by the government to build two new universities in Mpumalanga and the Northern Cape to address the challenge of space at the country’s tertiary institutions. While he made no mention of the project in his speech today, Gordhan did tell reporters earlier that work was currently at an advanced stage, pointing out that R300-million was provided in the fiscus for planning and design of the universities. Further financial commitments will be made as the projects get off the ground.Early childhood development programmes A further R1.4-billion will be spent over the next three years to support early childhood development programmes and the implementation of the community-based childcare and protection programme across the country. This will increase access to early childhood development from the current 500 000 to 580 000 children, with a focus on rural areas, with expectations that more than 10 000 young people will be employed as a result of the programme. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

South Africa’s population

first_imgSouth Africa’s population reflects a nation of diversity, with over 56.5-million people and a wide variety of cultures, languages and religious beliefs.A South African child wears his country’s flag on his face. (Image: Brand South Africa)According to Census 2011 the country’s population is 51.77-million, up from the census 2001 count of 44.8-million. Statistics South Africa’s 2017 mid-year population estimate puts the total at 56.5-million people.Africans are in the majority, making up 79.2% of the population. Coloured and white people each make up 8.9% of the total, and the Indian/Asian population 2.5%. The “other” population group makes up 0.5% of the total.According to Census 2011 data from Statistics South Africa, in 2011 the country’s population was 51 770 560, of which 26 581 769 (51.3%) were female and 25 188 791 (48.7%) were male.Africans are in the majority at just over 41-million, making up 79.2% of the total population. The coloured population is 4 615 401 (8.9%), while there are 4 586 838 (8.9%) whites. The Indian/Asian population stands at 1 286 930 (2.5%). In 2011, “other” was included in the Census, and accounts for 280 454 or 0.5% of the total.SOUTH AFRICA’S POPULATION: CENSUS 2011Population groupNumber% of totalAfrican41 000 93879.2%White4 586 8388.9%Coloured4 615 4018.9%Indian/Asian1 286 9302.5%Other280 4540.5%TOTAL51 770 560100% Sources: South Africa Gateway, Statistics South AfricaWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Phenomenal geocaching community stories from 2017

first_img SharePrint Related3 countries + 2 geocachers + 1 geocoin = an incredible twist of fateMarch 30, 2017In “Community”Geocaching Vacation Destinations – Geocaching.com Weekly NewsletterOctober 4, 2012In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”4 Legendary Trackables Every Geocacher Should FindFebruary 10, 2015In “Community” We look forward to what the next year brings to the geocaching community. Do you have a good story to tell? Tell us about it on Facebook or Twitter! Phenomenal geocaching communityA golden ammo box full of juicy geocaching secrets travels around France! A beloved German geocaching rock band retires after 10 years! A wheelchair-bound geocacher simultaneously nabs his first T5 and his 1,000th cache!Geocachers have always done great things and this past year was no exception. Here are some of the most phenomenal geocaching community stories from 2017. 3 countries + 2 geocachers + 1 geocoin = an incredible twist of fate3 countries + 2 geocachers + 1 geocoin = an incredible twist of fateTwo geocachers, one from Germany and one from Canada, meet at an event in Florida in the United States. The German cacher finds a treasured geocoin that the Canadian lost a year earlier on a muddy and flooded trail. At the end, one of them sums up the experience, “Clothing is wet, but spirits are high. Mission accomplished.”15 geocaches. 15 countries. 22 hours and 25 minutes. Geotrip ’17.15 geocaches. 15 countries. 22 hours and 25 minutes. Geotrip ’17.On a single day in April, a group of Finnish geocachers found geocaches in 15 different countries: Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, France, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Austria, Italy, Slovenia, Croatia, Hungary, Slovakia, Czechia, and Poland. In 2011, a group of Dutch geocachers did this route in just under 24 hours. This new group beat them by an hour and a half! It should be noted that the Geotrip’17 team drove according to speed limits and took their time to find each cache and log them. In order to achieve this, they preselected low difficulty caches with a few backups just in case.How do you say, “Golden Ammo Box” in French?How do you say, “Golden Ammo Box” in French?Boîte à munitions dorée. Although not the first to implement the concept of the “golden ammo box,” this French Mega-Event hosting duo pays it forward. The box travels from Mega-Event host to host, and contains coveted tips and tricks on hosting a successful Mega-Event.  Congratulations PodCacher on 600 episodes!Congratulations PodCacher on 600 episodes!Sonny and Sandy have been geocaching together since 2004 and hosting PodCacher since 2005. We learn more about where they grew up, how they met, what it’s like to do a podcast for over 13 years, and some of their favorite geocaches.Mission 9 is alive!Mission 9 is alive!On August 17, 2017, Moun10Bike, owner of the long-archived Mission 9: Tunnel of Light APE cache, registered an Owner Maintenance log on the cache page, “The enemy agents thought they had us defeated, but we have persevered. T minus thirty-six hours.” That rescued the northwest APE cache from archival and back into the world.T5 Klettersteig caching in AustriaT5 Klettersteig caching in AustriaGeocaching superwoman and self-proclaimed flip-flop connoisseur Annie Love travels to Austria and nabs her first Klettersteig cache. Klettersteig or via ferrata is a protected climbing route that incorporates cables, iron rungs, pegs, and ladders. Not only did this cache require nerves of steel, it also required carabiners, steel cables, gloves, helmets, and of course, close-toed shoes.The Dosenfischer — The  final curtainThe Dosenfischer — The final curtainThe Dosenfischer was a very popular German geocaching band. That’s right — they wrote and performed songs about geocaching. This past summer, after 10 successful years, they hung up the bass, drums, and guitar and played their last gig. If there’s one country that is absolutely INSANE for geocaching, it’s Germany.Canadian geocachers rescue stranded camper in remote woodsCanadian geocachers rescue stranded camper in remote woodsTwo geocachers in Ontario woke early one morning to grab an FTF, locate a previous DNF, complete a cemetery Multi-Cache, and log some trackables. But through a series of events that changed their course that day, they discovered a camper who had fallen two days before in a remote location and helped save his life.Max enters the treeMax enters the treeMax is a young man living from the Netherlands who is bound to a wheelchair. An avid geocacher, he had always dreamed of logging an elusive T5 cache. To make his 1,000th find memorable, his local geocaching community got together to get him into a tree to log a very special cache.Are you crazy?!? No, I’m Radu! Geo-cycling through 16 countries in 5 monthsAre you crazy?!? No, I’m Radu! Geo-cycling through 16 countries in 5 monthsRomanian-born geocacher Radu Clapa (Radu C) did the exceptional this past summer: geocaching on a bicycle through 16 countries. Although he focused on T5, Virtual, and Webcam caches, and managed to find an additional 1,400 Traditional caches. His 7,800 km (4900 mi) adventure started in Denmark on July 5th and ended on November 15th in Romania. center_img Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

Your “Real” Friends are Your Online Friends (or so Says Gen Y)

first_imgIs it easier to talk to your online buddies than your friends out there in the “real world?” Do you feel like you know more about what’s happening in the lives of your Facebook and MySpace friends than with those who don’t have accounts or don’t bother to update them? According to a recent UK MySpace study of over 16,000 social network users, these sorts of feelings are common among today’s younger generation. The study revealed that a good portion of this group admits to feeling more comfortable sharing and communicating with friends online than they do when logged out of cyberspace. Online: Sharing is Easier, Friends Know You BetterThe MySpace study asked social networking users between the ages of 14 and 21 (aka “Generation Y”) questions about their interactions both on social networks and in their real life, too. Some 36% of the respondents said they found it easier to talk about themselves online than in the real world, leading them to share more about themselves using technology. This group also felt that their online friends knew more about them, and so, in a sense, were closer than offline friends because they all knew what was going on in each other’s lives. Outside of the social networking sites, the survey respondents overwhelmingly felt ill-at-ease in social groups. A whopping 72% said they felt “left out” and didn’t think they fit into any particular group. More than four-fifths (82%) said they moved between four or more different groups of friends in an effort to find acceptance. It’s not entirely surprising that the younger generation feels this way. The teen years (and young adulthood to some extent) are a time when kids start exploring and experimenting with many different aspects of their personalities as they attempt to solidify who they are and who they will become as adults. What’s interesting, though, is how social networking is having an impact on this traditional coming-of-age process. Instead of simply feeling disjointed, confused, and lonely, today’s younger generation has an outlet for connecting with their peers which previous generations did not: the internet. Says Rebekah Horne, MySpace Europe managing director, the study provides insight into how this generation is “using online as a way to explore and settle into their burgeoning identities.”But at what cost? Will the younger generations remain awkward and shy in the real world as they age, only finding comfort in their interactions that occur online? Or does having an outlet for their feelings simply lessen the blow delivered by the otherwise often harsh process that is growing up? In many ways, easy access to technology can be seen as both a blessing and a curse for this young group of digital natives. These days, you’ll often encounter teens having text message conversations or posting status updates while ignoring the very friends they’re present with in the real world. Behavior like this could certainly send a message to the others that they are second priority to whomever else has engaged their friend’s attention. That could easily lead to feelings of being “left out” as reported in this study. And yet, at the same time, it’s this very technology that’s allowing the teens and young adults to feel like they have friends who know them and care about them.The issue is balancing that online life with the one out in the real world. The question as to whether this sort of behavior is healthy is one best left to psychologists to analyze and report, but there’s no doubt that at the very least, it is having an impact. Image credit: flickr user Paulo Fehlauer Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Related Posts center_img Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… Tags:#NYT#social networks#Trends#web sarah perezlast_img read more