News in brief: Cup draw, QPR youngster’s loan deal, Della-Verde injury

first_imgFA Cup drawAll four west London clubs have been drawn at home in the third round of the FA Cup.Chelsea will host Watford, now managed by former Blues midfielder Slavisa Jokanovic. The two sides met in the third round in both 2009-10 and 2003-04, and the fifth round in 2008-09.QPR play Sheffield United, last season’s semi-finalists, at Loftus Road – a repeat of a third-round tie from 2009-10.Both Brentford and Fulham were drawn at home to fellow Championship opposition. The Bees will entertain Brighton, who they beat 3-2 at Griffin Park earlier in the season, while Fulham host Wolves, hoping to avenge the 1-0 defeat they suffered in August.Michael HarrimanThe QPR full-back has had his loan deal at Luton Town extended until 10 January. The 22-year-old has made 10 appearances for the League Two high-flyers and been on the losing side just once.Jamie Sendles-WhiteQPR’s 20-year-old centre-back has returned to Loftus Road after his loan spell at Mansfield Town was cut short. The Northern Ireland under-21 international played eight games for the Stags after joining in October and was due to stay at Field Mill until early January.ChelseaThe Blues have agreed a deal for their development teams to continue to play at Aldershot Town next season. Chelsea’s Under-21s have played at the ESS Stadium for the past 18 months, while the Under-18s’ successful FA Youth Cup run last term began at the Conference Premier club’s ground.QPR LadiesIn the second round of the FA Women’s Cup, QPR have been drawn away to Eastbourne Town of the London and South East Regional Premier Division. Two leagues separate the two teams, who will meet at the The Saffrons on Sunday 11 January.Lyle Della-VerdeThe Fulham winger has been ruled out for at least three weeks with ankle ligament damage, ending his loan spell at Bristol Rovers. The 19-year-old was hurt during a Conference Premier match against Wrexham last week. He made seven appearances for Rovers but will now go back to Craven Cottage for treatment.Dennis MarriottThe former Middlesex bowler, who took more than 80 wickets for the club between 1972 and 1974, has died, aged 75. The left-armer was one of a relatively small group of players to have represented both Middlesex and Surrey.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Why you can’t second guess the A’s starting Sean Manaea over Mike Fiers

first_imgClick here if you’re unable to view the photo gallery on your mobile device.It didn’t take long for A’s fans to start writing revisionist history on Wednesday.That’s what happens when your team’s starting pitcher in a winner-take-all playoff game goes two innings and allows four runs, effectively torpedoing any chance of victory and ending the team’s season.After something like that it’s easy to second-guess manager Bob Melvin — or more accurately, the A’s front-office, as one has to think …last_img read more

It’s Not a Bird, It’s a Plane

first_imgLook to the birds of the air, and they will teach you aeronautics.  That’s what designers of the Robo-Swift did.  PhysOrg reported about a new plane that imitates a swift thing on the wing:RoboSwift is a micro airplane fitted with shape shifting wings, inspired by the common swift, one of nature’s most efficient flyers.  The micro airplane will have unprecedented wing characteristics; the wing geometry as well as the wing surface area can be adjusted continuously.  This makes RoboSwift more maneuverable and efficient.  Resembling the common swift, RoboSwift will be able to go undetected while using its three micro cameras to perform surveillance on vehicles and people on the ground.The article says that RoboSwift, designed by Dutch engineers, will also be able to fly along with swifts and study them up close.  One can only imagine what would be going through a swift’s bird brain upon seeing such a thing.  (See also the 04/29/2007 story on swifts.)    Scientists continue to learn more about bird flight.  Birds seem to break the rules of aerodynamics, reported MSNBC News.  But that can only mean that we don’t understand the rules very well yet.  Bird maneuverability vastly exceeds man’s aircraft.  PhysOrg explained that a new study of 138 bird species overturns “aerodynamic scaling rules that explain how flight varies according to weight and wing loading.” Their analysis reveals that the difference between the speed of small and large birds is not as great as expected; they suggest that this surprising result is likely to be the result of disadvantages associated with very slow speeds among smaller birds and with very fast speeds for larger birds.  They also show that the evolutionary history of the species helps explain much of the variation in flight speed: species of the same group tend to fly at similar characteristic speeds.  For example, birds of prey and herons had slow flight speeds, on average, given their mass and wing loading, whereas the average speed for songbirds and shorebirds was faster than would be predicted.Yet it would seem hard to claim knowledge of evolutionary history in the past when the article goes on to say that “there exists a diversity of cruising flight characteristics among birds that remain to be explored and understood” in the present, right under our noses.  David Tyler, writing for Access Research Network, has explored which paradigm – design or evolution – is more suited to the explosive rise in biomimetic engineering.Scientists should be swift to learn, slow to mythologize.  Evolutionists could not begin to explain how a lumbering dinosaur got the right combination of mutations to turn into a flying swift with aerodynamic engineering that is the envy of our smartest inventors.  Evolutionary claims are vacuous and useless.  Give us RoboSwifts and other useful inventions inspired by nature – as long as the government doesn’t use them to spy on honest citizens.    A reader wrote in about witnessing birds in flight:About two years ago I was privileged to watch two (presumably male) nighthawks performing in front of a third (presumably female) nighthawk that was sitting on a rock and incidentally performing for me, sitting on a tractor a few yards from the one on the rock.  One appeared to be chasing the other as they flew up the road, came back down through the orchard, dodging limbs in the tops of the cherry trees.  The tail of the first and the beak of the second were separated by about a foot, no more than 18 inches.  They flew at pursuit speed, much faster that when they are feeding hundreds of feet above the ground.  They matched wing strokes as they flew around and over limbs, trees, sagebrush and rock, usually no more than two or three feet from the obstacles.  Now and then the leader would perform some type of pull-up maneuver and the follower would become the leader.  I think this is what happened, but it was too swift for me to be sure.  In a word, it was awesome.(Visited 10 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Khoisan couple home at last

first_imgThe Khoisan or Bushmen people werethe subjects of degrading study andscrutiny in the 19th and early 20thcenturies, often stemming from Europe. The traditional Khoisan way of life is thesedays practised by fewer people. (Images: ‡Khomani San) The remains of Klaas and Trooi Pienaararrive at OR Tambo International – artsand culture minister Paul Mashatile, right,was one of the pallbearers.(Image: Jacaranda FM) MEDIA CONTACTS • Mack Lewele  Communications director  Dept of Arts and Culture  +27 12 331 3083 or +27 82 450 5076 RELATED ARTICLES • !Khwa ttu: the way of the San • Locals gain from medicinal herb deal • Cash boost for Baartman memorial • African human genomes decoded • Paddling through N Cape paradiseMediaClubSouthAfrica.com reporterThe South African government has repatriated the remains of a Khoisan couple, Klaas and Trooi Pienaar, after an extended sojourn of over a century in Austria.Arts and culture minister Paul Mashatile, accompanied by a group of Khoisan people that included local chief Adam Mathysen and relatives of the couple, received the Pienaars’ remains from a government delegation led by deputy minister Joe Phaahla at OR Tambo International Airport towards the end of April.A statement from the Department of Arts and Culture said it was ”no coincidence that the Pienaars final return to the soil of their birth comes in April, when we celebrate our hard won freedom”.It was 103 years since the couple had been shipped off to Austria by a scientist supposedly conducting research.In 1909 the couple died within a month of each other on a farm near Kuruman in the Northern Cape, and their bodies had barely been laid to rest when an Austrian anthropologist, Rudolf Poch, sent an emissary to exhume the couple and take them overseas for study.With no permits in place, the exhumation operation was conducted illegally, and the bodies were hidden in a barrel of salt and taken off the African continent to become subjects of Poch’s so-called racial research.Many years later, their remains were tracked down by history professor Ciraj Rassool of the University of the Western Cape, and prominent Cape Town-based historian and activist Martin Legassick. They found that the Pienaars had been kept at the Imperial Academy of Sciences before removal to the Natural History Museum in Vienna.But the South African government viewed them as citizens, and worked with the Austrian government for four years to reach an agreement to bring the Pienaars’ remains back to their land of birth.Coming home at lastSpeaking to reporters after receiving the remains, Mashatile described the return of the Khoisan couple as a significant milestone.“It is particularly a triumph over oppression,” he said. “They will now rest in peace among their people.”The minister said the couple will be given proper re-burial amongst their people in the Northern Cape next month.“We’ve reached an agreement with the Pienaar family, the Northern Cape provincial government, and the Khoisan community that the reburial should be conducted in the second week of May.”Mashatile said the Austrian government relinquished the remains three days before the flight home. A delegation of Khoisan people performed a ceremony at the National History Museum in Vienna upon receiving the couple.One of the couple’s direct granddaughters, Francis Pienaar, said that although her grandparents’ graves were exhumed in Danielskuil near Kuruman, as a family they have not yet decided where the re-burial will take place.“We are extremely excited and we don’t know how we can thank our government,” she said.Restoring dignityAccording to Rassool, the Natural History Museum and Vienna University’s Institute of Anthropology still hold the remains of some 50 South Africans and the partial remains of about 150 more – but because the Pienaars’ names had been discovered and subsequently their place of origin, it was possible to bring them back.However, efforts will begin to repatriate the others as well.Northern Cape MEC for social development, Alvin Botes, said people of the Northern Cape viewed the repatriation of the Pienaars’ remains as dear efforts by the government.“We are looking forward to giving the couple a proper re-burial and from now on, we are saying our human dignity should be respected and none of our graves should be opened or exhumed without our permission,” he said.The operation is part of the government’s efforts to restore dignity to the victims of colonialism and racism. In January 2002, Sarah Baartman‘s remains were returned to South Africa, which put an end to the many years of exploitation she endured abroad.last_img read more

Press release: Memories of the Struggle: Australians Against Apartheid an exhibition by ASAA

first_imgA multimedia exhibition that launches this week is to showcase a photographic timeline of events that weaves together a narrative of Australia’s involvement in the fight against apartheid.Premier of Gauteng Province, Mr David Makhura, is one of the people to officially open the multimedia exhibition. (Image: GCIS)Johannesburg, Monday 30 October 2017 – The Australasian South African Alliance (ASAA), in partnership with the Australian High Commission in South Africa, Brand South Africa and Constitution Hill, will launch an exhibition titled – Memories of the Struggle: Australians Against Apartheid, in Johannesburg on Thursday, 02 November 2017 at Constitution Hill at 18h30.This multimedia exhibition, to be officially opened by the Premier of Gauteng Province, Mr David Makhura and the Australian High Commissioner to South Africa, His Excellency, Mr Adam McCarthy, is a photographic timeline of events that weaves together a narrative of Australia’s involvement in the fight against apartheid.It will share insights into the Australian contribution to the collapse of apartheid, such as the ‘Stop the Tours’ movement which served to sever cricket and rugby relations with Apartheid South Africa. Such activism did not occur without political controversy or conflicts as related throughout the various sections of the exhibition.Several former activists such as• Anthony Abrahams, one of the Wallabies who campaigned against the 1971 rugby tour• Meredith Burgmann and Verity Burgmann who famously stopped the game in Sydney (where Meredith was given a two-month jail sentence)• Ken Davis and Frances Letters, who were both arrested during sporting tour protests• Jane Singleton, former Chair of the Australian National ANC Support Committee will be present at the launch and will be joined by a number of South African expats – Natalie Hendricks, Sybil Wakefield, Ish Larney, Pat Wagner – active then under the umbrella of the AAAM as well as currently under that of ASAA. Fellow compatriot, Angus Leendertz, an UCT alumnus, now resident in Sydney, is the curator of this innovative ‘step back into history and personal memories’.“Brand South Africa is honoured to be partnering with the ASAA in the execution of the exhibition, especially at such a historical place such as Constitution Hill, which symbolises South Africa’s journey to democracy”, said Brand South Africa’s CEO Dr Kingsley Makhubela.“We are indeed proud to be welcoming the exhibition within the Constitution Hill precinct which indeed serves as an effective custodian and proponent of Constitutionalism, Human Rights and Democracy in South Africa. It is a living museum where the past, present and future collide in a unique paradox that celebrates the victory of our present day democracy. A visit here leaves you forever changed with the unrelenting resolve ‘never again must one human being treat another human being in this manner, said ConHill CEO Ms Dawn Robertson.The exhibition, though focused on Australia, surfaces a largely unknown ‘history’ and narrative among the local general public of the significant roles played by social justice activists around the globe in support of the anti-apartheid struggle whether through blockades of armaments factories by workers in the UK; the vigorous divestment campaigns on campuses throughout the USA; the ‘End Bank Loans’ and ‘Boycott Outspan Oranges’ campaigns across most of Western Europe, the UK and Japan!“This celebration of activism fits so well with the current (social justice) campaigns that prove you CAN make a difference. Principled and gutsy Australians helped make a difference to the lives of hundreds of thousands of South Africans”, said former Chair of the Australian National ANC Support Committee, Ms Jane Singleton.“I hope that visitors to the exhibition leave with the knowledge that Australia was, and remains today, a friend and supporter of a free and democratic South Africa”, said Australian High Commissioner, His Excellency Mr Adam McCarthy.Media is invited as follows:High-res pictures are available on request.Date: Thursday, 02 November 2017Time: 17:00 for pre-interviews18:30 Official OpeningVenue: The Constitution Hill,11 Kotze Road, JohannesburgRSVP and for more information or to set up interviews, please see contacts below:RSVPS/Enquiries: Ntombi NtanziTel: +27 11 712 5061Mobile: +27 (0) 81 704 1488Email: ntombin@brandsouthafrica.comNotes to the EditorAbout the ExhibitionMemories of the Struggle – Australians Against ApartheidAbout Brand South AfricaBrand South Africa is the official marketing agency of South Africa, with a mandate to build the country’s brand reputation, in order to improve its global competitiveness. Its aim is also to build pride and patriotism among South Africans, in order to contribute to social cohesion and nation brand ambassadorship.Join the conversation at:Follow Brand South AfricaOn Twitter: @Brand_SAOn the Official Brand South Africa Facebook account.Tell us how you Play Your Part:On Twitter: @PlayYourPartSA or via the website.last_img read more

Phenomenal geocaching community stories from 2017

first_img SharePrint Related3 countries + 2 geocachers + 1 geocoin = an incredible twist of fateMarch 30, 2017In “Community”Geocaching Vacation Destinations – Geocaching.com Weekly NewsletterOctober 4, 2012In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”4 Legendary Trackables Every Geocacher Should FindFebruary 10, 2015In “Community” We look forward to what the next year brings to the geocaching community. Do you have a good story to tell? Tell us about it on Facebook or Twitter! Phenomenal geocaching communityA golden ammo box full of juicy geocaching secrets travels around France! A beloved German geocaching rock band retires after 10 years! A wheelchair-bound geocacher simultaneously nabs his first T5 and his 1,000th cache!Geocachers have always done great things and this past year was no exception. Here are some of the most phenomenal geocaching community stories from 2017. 3 countries + 2 geocachers + 1 geocoin = an incredible twist of fate3 countries + 2 geocachers + 1 geocoin = an incredible twist of fateTwo geocachers, one from Germany and one from Canada, meet at an event in Florida in the United States. The German cacher finds a treasured geocoin that the Canadian lost a year earlier on a muddy and flooded trail. At the end, one of them sums up the experience, “Clothing is wet, but spirits are high. Mission accomplished.”15 geocaches. 15 countries. 22 hours and 25 minutes. Geotrip ’17.15 geocaches. 15 countries. 22 hours and 25 minutes. Geotrip ’17.On a single day in April, a group of Finnish geocachers found geocaches in 15 different countries: Netherlands, Belgium, Luxembourg, Germany, France, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Austria, Italy, Slovenia, Croatia, Hungary, Slovakia, Czechia, and Poland. In 2011, a group of Dutch geocachers did this route in just under 24 hours. This new group beat them by an hour and a half! It should be noted that the Geotrip’17 team drove according to speed limits and took their time to find each cache and log them. In order to achieve this, they preselected low difficulty caches with a few backups just in case.How do you say, “Golden Ammo Box” in French?How do you say, “Golden Ammo Box” in French?Boîte à munitions dorée. Although not the first to implement the concept of the “golden ammo box,” this French Mega-Event hosting duo pays it forward. The box travels from Mega-Event host to host, and contains coveted tips and tricks on hosting a successful Mega-Event.  Congratulations PodCacher on 600 episodes!Congratulations PodCacher on 600 episodes!Sonny and Sandy have been geocaching together since 2004 and hosting PodCacher since 2005. We learn more about where they grew up, how they met, what it’s like to do a podcast for over 13 years, and some of their favorite geocaches.Mission 9 is alive!Mission 9 is alive!On August 17, 2017, Moun10Bike, owner of the long-archived Mission 9: Tunnel of Light APE cache, registered an Owner Maintenance log on the cache page, “The enemy agents thought they had us defeated, but we have persevered. T minus thirty-six hours.” That rescued the northwest APE cache from archival and back into the world.T5 Klettersteig caching in AustriaT5 Klettersteig caching in AustriaGeocaching superwoman and self-proclaimed flip-flop connoisseur Annie Love travels to Austria and nabs her first Klettersteig cache. Klettersteig or via ferrata is a protected climbing route that incorporates cables, iron rungs, pegs, and ladders. Not only did this cache require nerves of steel, it also required carabiners, steel cables, gloves, helmets, and of course, close-toed shoes.The Dosenfischer — The  final curtainThe Dosenfischer — The final curtainThe Dosenfischer was a very popular German geocaching band. That’s right — they wrote and performed songs about geocaching. This past summer, after 10 successful years, they hung up the bass, drums, and guitar and played their last gig. If there’s one country that is absolutely INSANE for geocaching, it’s Germany.Canadian geocachers rescue stranded camper in remote woodsCanadian geocachers rescue stranded camper in remote woodsTwo geocachers in Ontario woke early one morning to grab an FTF, locate a previous DNF, complete a cemetery Multi-Cache, and log some trackables. But through a series of events that changed their course that day, they discovered a camper who had fallen two days before in a remote location and helped save his life.Max enters the treeMax enters the treeMax is a young man living from the Netherlands who is bound to a wheelchair. An avid geocacher, he had always dreamed of logging an elusive T5 cache. To make his 1,000th find memorable, his local geocaching community got together to get him into a tree to log a very special cache.Are you crazy?!? No, I’m Radu! Geo-cycling through 16 countries in 5 monthsAre you crazy?!? No, I’m Radu! Geo-cycling through 16 countries in 5 monthsRomanian-born geocacher Radu Clapa (Radu C) did the exceptional this past summer: geocaching on a bicycle through 16 countries. Although he focused on T5, Virtual, and Webcam caches, and managed to find an additional 1,400 Traditional caches. His 7,800 km (4900 mi) adventure started in Denmark on July 5th and ended on November 15th in Romania. center_img Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

Keeping Your Video Editing Projects Organized

first_imgKeeping a project clean and organized is essential. Spend less time searching for assets and more time editing. In this post, we share organization tips and a free project file.If you’re going to call yourself a professional, you should work like a professional. An insanely disorganized project is a nightmare, and ultimately reflects poorly upon you as en editor. We bring in freelancers pretty regularly at my office and if I’m given the choice to bring back a great editor who leaves a disaster of files and other mess in their wake or  a slightly less great editor who keeps things in order and under control you can bet I’ll choose the organized one every time. He or she makes it easier for me to quickly pick up the project for later revisions if necessary.In this post, I want to share a structure for  how I like to organize my video editing projects. This is an empty skeleton that I use as a basis for all projects, then fill-in as needed: Here’s how I use these bins, including the thinking behind them:The Audio BinGenerally, nothing goes in the top-level Audio folder. Everything should be sorted into the appropriate subfolder: Music, SFX (Sound Effects) or VO (Voice Over).The Edits BinSometimes labeled as “Sequences” by my coworkers, this bin should have the most current version of the project directly inside. Previous/outdated versions should be put in the Archive folder for reference if needed, but out of the way of the current version so that there’s no confusion if another editor has to pick up the project.The Selects bin is for timelines containing your top picks from the footage, organized by B-Roll, Interview (organized by interviewee, question/topic or lumped into one), Scene X, Y, Z, etc.The Footage BinAll project footage goes into here. If I have to sync audio and make merged clips, I typically make a Raw bin and a Merged bin within the Footage bin. Otherwise, I just break up by card, reel, day, subject – whatever makes the most sense for the project.The GFX BinThis bin is used for assets that aren’t based on footage and are generally computer generated: titles, adjustment layers, logos, lower thirds, motion graphics, etc.The VFX BinThis bin is used for assets that are based on footage, but aren’t raw footage themselves. An example would be a keyed and rendered green screen shot, a shot that’s had matte painting or wire-removal, etc. I also use this bin for things like film grain (Cinegrain, Gorilla Grain, et al.), lens flares, light leaks, etc.All I have to do to keep my project organized is drag to the right bin when I import my assets. Super simple. That structure covers the major things that I encounter in most projects, and I can add bins when I hit something new. Below is an example of how I’ve used these bins in a project. Click image for larger view.Organization should be a basic skill for any video editor. That said, I know a lot of editors just aren’t organized, no matter how much they want to be. It’s often due to laziness (they don’t want to take the time to make bins) or having such a tight deadline they don’t keep things organized during the video editing process.The best way to combat this tendency (whether you have that tendency, or a coworker or employee has it), is to take the majority of the work of out organizing your project. A blank project with these bins already in it is a great thing to keep handy. Just duplicate the project file for every new project and you’re all set up. All you have to do is watch where you drag.Quick Tip: If you’re working in a multi-editor office, take a screenshot of the bin organization structure and distribute it to every editor. Laminate it and post it up at every video editing station so that each editor will use the same structure throughout their edit.As a little time saver and incentive to keep you and your fellow editors sane, you can download a Premiere Pro CC project below with this bin structure already set up. As an added bonus, it comes set up with one of my favorite Premiere Layouts that I’ve worked up (assuming you have Premiere set to import workspaces). Happy editing![maxbutton id=”8″]last_img read more