Missaga: I didn’t ask Star Times to cancel SC Villa deal

first_img Tags: Ben MisaggaSC VillaStarTimestop Ben Misagga resigned as SC Villa president on Sunday (File Photo)KAMPALA – Barely a day after Pay-TV company StarTimes issued a statement letting SC Villa know that they (StarTimes) had terminated their sponsorship agreement with the 16 time record league champions, outgoing club president Ben Misagga has come out and accepted that he notified the sponsors about his resignation but did not ask them to break ties with club.Also read: StarTimes terminates sponsorship deal with SC VillaThis comes after several rumors have been doing rounds claiming that Misagga asked StarTimes to terminate the sponsorship agreement.“Yes i wrote to StarTimes after resigning from Villa, said Misagga in an interview with PML Daily.“I had to let them know that i was no longer SC Villa president like an elite person is supposed to do.“I also had to let them know that going forward, i was not in position to grantee the image of their brand, continued Misagga.“If you look at what i wrote, i don’t think it is asking or telling them to terminate their agreement with Villa despite the fact that i got the deal using my own efforts and strength.“The other thing people don’t get is that i never got that deal here in Uganda like many keep on saying.Misagga went ahead to dare anyone who can produce evidence that he asked StarTimes to terminate their agreement with SC Villa.“Whoever says that i asked for a termination of the agreement should produce the document that i sent to StarTimes and prove i did likewise.“I am not jealous about Villa but what i didn’t want was StarTimes staying with Villa thinking am still around to protect their interests.On Wednesday evening, StarTimes wrote to the SC Villa Chief Executive Officer notifying him that they had terminated the club’s sponsorship agreement.This all comes just days after the outgoing Villa President Ben announced his resignation from the role on Sunday at Villa Park, the club’s training ground.Also read: Misagga resigns as SC Villa presidentMisagga sighted that he had been forced to step aside after FUFA had refused Villa to conduct elections which he claims, is an act against the club’s constitution.With just over a month to the start of the 2018/19 Uganda Premier League season, it remains to be seen where all this fiasco in VIlla is headed as the managerless club looks to be in shambles with players and officials departing yet there is no clear signals that new faces are coming in.Villa finished third in the league last season and lost 1-0 over two legs against Vipers SC in the semi finals of the FUFA Uganda Cup.Comments last_img read more

Human Adaptation Can Be Rapid

first_imgHow long does it take for humans to adapt to environmental changes?  Some recent papers investigated this question.Paleface:  If it is assumed that humans started out medium or dark-skinned, how long did it take for Europeans to lose much of that original pigment?  An article in Science April 20 says maybe just 6,000 to 12,000 years.  “This contradicts a long-standing hypothesis that modern humans in Europe grew paler about 40,000 years ago, as soon as they migrated into northern latitudes,” the article states, reporting on a March meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.  Pale skin is said to have an adaptive value at high latitudes: “Under darker skies, pale skin absorbs more sunlight than dark skin, allowing ultraviolet rays to produce more vitamin D for bone growth and calcium absorption.”  The new date was based on genetic studies that suggested a “selective sweep occurred 5300 to 6000 years ago” or up to 12,000 years ago, “given the imprecision of method”.High life:  Ann Gibbons in Science reported on another discussion item from the American Association of Physical Anthropologists: how Tibetan children can tolerate the high altitude.  “Researchers seldom see Darwinian natural selection happening in living people,” she began.  “So physical anthropologist Cynthia Beall was delighted in 2004 when she discovered a trait that boosts the survival of some Tibetan children, apparently by raising the level of oxygen in their mothers’ tissues–a crucial advantage during pregnancy 4 kilometers above sea level.”  Updated research has revealed a genetic change that allows women to boost their blood volume and deliver more oxygen to the tissues.  Beall measured the selective pressure at 1:0.44, stronger than the fitness ratio measured for the sickle-cell gene.  They said, “the adaptation represents some of the strongest natural selection yet measured in humans.”    Surprisingly, this appears to be a different adaptation mechanism than that found in populations living in the Andes.  There, mothers are able to boost the amount of hemoglobin.  These correlations are uncertain, however; “it’s quite possible that the Tibetans have evolved more than one way to boost blood oxygen,” Beall cautioned.  Mark Gladwin threw in a Darwinian proverb: “Study the pregnant women, because that’s where you’ll see evolution in action.”Got milk?  Another strong selection effect in humans is for lactose tolerance.  Current Biology (April 17) had an article on this phenomenon, which “might have meant the difference between life and death” to early dairy farmers, Greg Gibson (North Carolina State U) said.  The admittedly imperfect ability to tolerate lactose represents another selective sweep some 5,000 to 10,000 years ago, about the time humans began to domesticate cattle.  He remarked, “It is hard to refute that this is a lovely example of the coevolution of genes and culture.”    Nevertheless, Gibson spent most of the article debunking the “thrifty genes” hypothesis of evolutionary selection.  This is a 45-year-old idea that the “high incidence of diabetes in modern humans is a result of positive selection for alleles that confer the ability to rapidly sequester rare caches of carbohydrates as fat that would tide us over during famine.”  This adaptation now works against us in our urbanized society, it is claimed: it tends us toward obesity.  So why does Gibson think this is a poor hypothesis?  “Unfortunately, these three preconditions for natural selection are all too often mistaken by adaptationists as both necessary and sufficient for evolution to occur,” he cautioned.  But we need to be more quantitative if sufficiency is to be proven.”  At the end, he was even more emphatic: “Those inclined toward Darwinian medicine like to explain disease as the price we pay for the beneficial effects of alleles that have accompanied human adaptation.  These cases of not-so-thrifty genes suggest though that we should not be so quick to jump on the bandwagon: the coevolution of genes and culture is tremendously more complex.”Funny he should mention Darwinian medicine.  A paper on that very subject appeared in Public Library of Science: Biology this month.  Catriona J. MacCallum tried again to make the case that medical doctors need to study evolution to understand disease (cf. 01/13/2003.  Distressed that medical schools are not considering evolution essential to the curriculum (see 06/25/2003), MacCallum wrote,It is curious that Charles Darwin, perhaps medicine’s most famous dropout, provided the impetus for a subject that figures so rarely in medical education.  Indeed, even the iconic textbook example of evolution—antibiotic resistance—is rarely described as “evolution” in relevant papers published in medical journals.  Despite potentially valid reasons for this oversight (e.g., that authors of papers in medical journals would regard the term as too general), it propagates into the popular press when those papers are reported on, feeding the wider perception of evolution’s irrelevance in general, and to medicine in particular.  Yet an understanding of how natural selection shapes vulnerability to disease can provide fundamental insights into medicine and health and is no less relevant than an understanding of physiology or biochemistry.MacCallum agreed that the “thrifty gene” concept has fallen into disfavor.  Some other evolutionary ideas are also simplistic: “The relationship between changing environment, diet, and susceptibility to disease, however, is also far from clear.”  Attempts to recreate a Stone-Age Diet “can be misleading,” she said.  Still, she promoted the idea that evolutionary concepts can help medical practice.  Granted, a mechanic may not need to understand the history of technology to fix a car, but an understanding of the evolutionary principles can help prepare for outbreaks of infectious disease, like bird flu, she argued.    Why the resistance to evolutionary teaching in medical schools?  In some cases, it’s the students who rebel:Although Paul O’Higgins thought a comparison of the brachial plexus to the pentadactyl limb was helpful, not all his students agreed—complaints were lodged that he was forcing evolution on them.  That lack of support was also reflected in the participation of only three medical students at the York meeting (albeit enthusiastic ones), despite being widely publicized.  It is not clear whether this is because medical students are more overburdened than most or because of a more deep-rooted resistance to the subject, reflecting wider political and religious prejudice against evolution.So what’s the solution?  “But evolutionary medicine isn’t and shouldn’t be controversial, and the best way to challenge prejudice is through education.”  She took refuge in the famous Dobzhansky quote, “Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution.”  As an experiment, let’s consider the three cases listed above.  It isn’t very controversial that survivors of lactose, decreased sunlight and oxygen will predominate in those environments, but aren’t they all still human?  Is this really the kind of evolution that Darwin meant?    MacCallum was undaunted by such questions.  “The time has clearly come for medicine to explicitly integrate evolutionary biology into its theoretical and practical underpinnings,” she ended with rhetorical flair.  “The medical students of Charles Darwin’s day did not have the advantage of such a powerful framework to inform their thinking; we shouldn’t deprive today’s budding medical talent of the potential insights to be gained at the intersection of these two great disciplines.”  Convincing the medical students of this may be the hard part.You do NOT want an evolutionary biologist in the room when you need TLC at the hospital.  Lying in bed with pain and weakness, you are not going to look like a fit individual who deserves to survive.    MacCallum again exhibited the shallowness and uselessness of evolutionary thinking.  Notice also the elitist snobbery: anyone who doesn’t agree with the Darwin Party Framework is prejudiced by definition, and must be sent to the re-education camp (cf. 12/21/2005).    Despite the pleas to pul-lease teach Darwin in medical school, medicine is doing fine without the help of Dropout Darwin.  Medicine has a multi-thousand year history that was advanced largely by Christians.  The examples she cited, including the “iconic textbook example” of evolution – antibiotic resistance (dealt a blow by Jonathan Wells in his book Icons of Evolution; see also the Darwinist confession from 09/12/2004) – are all just microevolutionary changes.  The three examples reported above are all microevolutionary changes.  Natural selection at the micro level is not the issue.  Even young-earth creationists accept that.    Such evidence has nothing to do with Darwin’s colossal simplistic generality, the Mystical Tree of Life (02/01/2007).  It has nothing to do with proving that humans have bacteria ancestors, and most medical students and professors know it.  You can almost hear the snickers of students in the classroom when the Prof tells his little fable about how the brachial plexus resembles the pentadactyl limb.  “Right, Teach.  Will that be on the test?  Can I take a pill and call you in the morning?”  Maybe the only way to get a higher turnout than three students at the next well-publicized “Medicine and Evolution” meeting is to award extra credit, provided the students are allowed to bring cots and pillows.    Despite the Dobzhansky rallying cry, things make perfect sense without evolution.  In none of the three cases listed above is Darwin vindicated or needed.  All the humans in those societies are still one species with the rest of humanity, capable of intermarrying and raising children.  What’s more, the adaptive changes observed did not take hundreds of thousands of years.  To the consternation of earlier Darwinists whose ideas are now discredited, the changes fit easily within a Biblical framework of human history.  What is Darwin’s score?  Even MacCallum admits that previous evolutionary ideas like “thrifty genes” have been discarded.  Is anything left that is not controversial and subject to overthrow?  We don’t need Darwin.  We don’t want Darwin.  We want to make sense in the light of the evidence, and help the weak in the process.(Visited 15 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

At Microsoft’s TechFest, The Future Is Big. Big Screens, That Is

first_img8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Buying and installing a wall-sized display might seem ludicrous at the moment, but let’s bear with Microsoft for a moment — this is the future, after all. What Pahud’s video shows us, though, is how close this future is to reality.Some of what Pahud describes may seem familiar. Placing a finger on the screen opens a “palette” of available options next to it, similar to the radial menu that Microsoft included in its OneNote application. If the user spreads his fingers, the palette expands to include new options. Part of this could be enabled with a touch display; alternatively, a Kinect sensor could also be used to “see” how a user is actually interacting with the display.When a user approaches with a Windows smartphone, the phone syncs with the display. When the user is close to the display, the phone shows the palette options. Farther away, the phone shifts into a “remote control” mode, presenting a keyboard and allowing the user to search and control via his voice.“So in conclusion we have been looking at the strengths of the large display, the strengths of the phone, and combine them together as a society of appliances,” Pahud said.A second video, authored by Microsoft researcher Bongshin Lee, takes the concept of “palette” in a different direction. By drawing an “L” on the display, the SketchInsight technology concept draws a graph; writing the labels for the X and Y axes not only assigns values to both, but also begins filling in the data (from a predetermined source, I assume). In a nifty trick, drawing a battery icon populates the graph with the appropriate data, also using the elongated icon as a the element of a bar graph.Lee’s video isn’t nearly as impressive as Pahud’s demonstration, if only because the source of the data is never really made clear, nor is how the data should be bounded. Creating a pie chart merely by drawing a circle is a nice touch, however, and shows how data can be herded into the appropriate format using the appropriate tool.Microsoft also presented research papers on:Adaptive machine learning. As a front-end tool, this is a bit difficult to conceptualize. Microsoft showed off several examples of machine learning, ranging from the relatively trivial — using machine learning to decide the category of a business expense — to the more profound, such as using a manufacturing profile to determine whether a semiconductor wafer was defective or not.Analyzing viral content. Much as you would expect, Microsoft’s research showed that “viral” content doesn’t originate from a single source, but is spontaneously shared by a number of influencers, whose content ripples across the online sphere. But Microsoft researcher Jake Hofman also developed a tool that would help analyze the “clout” of individuals on the Web, and track the virality of content they share. The Kinect handgrip. While this may seem relatively trivial, Microsoft views the ability to close one’s hand into a fist — the “handgrip” — as the gestural equivalent of a mouse click, and the company said that it would be supported in future versions of the Kinect SDK.Microsoft’s TechFest doesn’t necessarily mean that these products will come to market and be built into next-generation Microsoft-branded products. But it’s a good indication that this is the direction the company is headed.Here are some more images from TechFest:Freeform Sketching: Using Microsoft’s SketchInsight tool, the user sketches an exampleicon, and SketchInsight automatically completes the chart by synthesizing data fromexample sketches. SketchInsight also enables the presenter to interact with the data charts.3D Scene capture: Using several live color and depth images, this technology builds a high-resolution composition of the visible surfaces in a scene using voxels, a sort of three-dimensional pixel. Unlike previous methods, Microsoft’s project captures people moving and talking, using the graphics chips found within a PC.3D Haptic Touch: A way to move through 3D models. The X and Y interactions come via X and Y touch interaction on the screen, visually scrolling in two dimensions. Pushing “into” the display physically moves the screen down, and the video renders the appropriate depth.Lead image courtesy of Microsoft Tags:#Microsoft#research#smartphone Maybe you’ve wanted to control your big-screen TV with your smartphone for years, even though the idea has been a nonstarter for most of that time. Now Microsoft, which insists that it sees large-screen computing devices playing a dominant role in the home and workplace, says it will make that a reality.On Tuesday, Microsoft kicked off TechFest, a research fair of sorts where the company’s engineers emerge from their darkened labs and reveal their notion of the tech future. And perhaps more important, how we’re going to get there.Over twenty projects will be on display, including older exhibits such as one that lets you animate household objects using your body. One of the most significant presentations came from senior researcher Michel Pahud, who showed off how users could interact with large-screen displays, either directly or using their phone.Why is this important? Consider the following concept video, which shows how Microsoft imagines users interacting with massive interactive displays projected onto walls and ceilings. It’s a showcase for what Microsoft calls “natural user interfaces,” or ways of interacting with computers via touch, voice and gestures instead of a keyboard. (Microsoft has authored similar videos before, such as the “smart glass” concept from 2009 and a similar video in 2011 that showcased holograms.)The problem with controlling displays such as TVs via smartphone is that the phone is usually sitting right next to a remote control — a purpose-built, and often superior, device. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… markhachmanlast_img read more

How You Know Your Excuses Aren’t True

first_imgIf you believe there is some external reason you can’t produce the results you want, you must be willing to look at the evidence stacked up against you. The evidence strongly suggests that there are people who are producing that same result under the same circumstances.Here is how I know this is true:One person believes their company is too expensive, that they can’t beat their irrational competitor, and that there is no way to command the price they need. Other salespeople in the sales company with the same pricing model and the same irrational competitor are going to President’s club. If it is possible for the people who are succeeding to sell and win, it is possible for you.You might use the excuse that you don’t have time to do whatever it is that you should be doing, like exercising, reading, meditating, working more or some other activity that would improve your life. There are other people—some of them busier than you—who use the same 24 hours that you have to do some or all of these things. Of course, these people are armed with the superpowers of self-discipline, focus, and priorities, superpowers that are available to you whenever you want them.Excuses absolve you of the responsibility to change, to do something different. When you choose to use something external as an excuse, you do so because there is nothing you can do about something outside of your control. If there is nothing you can do about whatever you are using as an excuse, you are free from the responsibility to do something different—even if you are not free of the consequences.Your government, your manager, your territory, your pricing model, and your irrational competitor are not valid excuses. You share all these things with other people who are succeeding. Neither is being constrained by the same 24 hours that you share with all the other inhabitants of planet Earth.Your excuses aren’t true. They’re just a way to absolve yourself of the responsibility to change.last_img read more

2018 was a landmark year for BJP, women in Northeast

first_imgThe Bharatiya Janata Party expanded its footprint across the Northeast in 2018 by forming coalition governments in Manipur, Nagaland and Tripura. But a regional party, Mizo National Front, struck the final blow in Mizoram to make the region “Congress-free”.The year was also the best and the worst for women in the Northeast. Assam’s sprinter Hima Das made history for Indian athletics by striking gold in the 400m at the World U-20 Athletics championship in Finland and Manipur pugilist M.C. Mary Kom created a world record at 35 by winning her sixth gold at the World Women Boxing championship. Assam’s Rima Das became a household name when her low-budget film Village Rockstars got the best national film award and was nominated as India’s entry for the Oscars in the best foreign films category.On the flip side, Meghalaya-based activists Agnes Kharshiing and Amita Sangma battled for life after members of alleged coal mafia assaulted them for following and documenting illegally stacked coal and coal-laden trucks. The assault on them and a mishap in an illegal mine at Ksan in the State’s East Jaintia Hills district a month later put the spotlight on an unholy nexus that encourages coal mine owners – many of them lawmakers – flout an April 2014 ban by NGT on ‘rat-hole’ mining with impunity.At least 13 miners – survivors of the mishap caused by flooding of the 350ft deep mine claimed there are 17 – trapped are feared dead. A renewed effort to rescue them or recover their bodies resumed on Sunday after initial attempts failed.NRC, Citizenship BillThe issue that hogged the headlines was that of exercise to update the National Register of Citizens in Assam and the Narendra Modi government’s bid to pass the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill, 2016, that seeks to legitimise the stay of non-Muslims who migrated from Afghanistan, Bangladesh and Pakistan till December 2014 due to alleged religious persecution.The defining moment of the NRC exercise began past the midnight of December 31, 2017, with the publication of the first draft that accommodated 1.39 crore out of the 3.29 crore applicants. The complete draft was released on July 31 with the names of 40.07 lakh people left out of the list. The claims and objections round for the excluded to be back on the list by producing relevant proof of citizenship ends on December 31. This round had begun on September 25.The crowning glory for Assam was the appointment of Ranjan Gogoi, the man at the helm of the Supreme Court-monitored NRC, as the first Chief Justice of the apex court from the Northeast.The BJP, which began its ‘saffron surge’ in the region by winning the Assam elections in 2016, formed the government in Manipur and Arunachal Pradesh in 2017. In March, it swept the Left Front out of Tripura, ended Congress rule in Meghalaya with the help of regional allies, and chose a new regional partner to continue the NDA reign in Nagaland.But the BJP’s gamble on ethnic minorities did not quite come off in Mizoram. The MNF – a member of the BJP-helmed North East Democratic Alliance – ended the 10-year rule of the Congress to return to power.The BJP in Assam saved the blues for the party in Chhattisgarh, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan to win 41% seats in the panchayat polls. This indicated that the anger in Assam against the Citizenship Bill did not have much impact on the rural electorate.But the Bill was seen as one of the reasons of the perceived resurgence of extremist groups such as the United Liberation Front of Asom-Independent. Security forces blamed the outfit for killing five Hindu Bengalis, seen as beneficiaries of the Bill, in eastern Assam’s Tinsukia district. Connectivity and wildlifeConnectivity in the Northeast came a long way with a slew of highway and railway projects having been sanctioned, undertaken or completed. The highlight was the inauguration of the 4.94 km Bogibeel Bridge, India’s longest rail and road span, across the Brahmaputra river and the construction of the piers of the world’s tallest railway bridge on the Jiribam-Imphal railway line under way.The year also saw hurdles such as land acquisition being removed for Hollongi, the first major civilian airport project in Arunachal Pradesh whose foundation stone is expected to be laid by Prime Minister Narendra Modi in January 2019.Inland water connectivity too received a boost with two barges carrying 1,233 tonnes of bagged fly ash from Bihar reaching Guwahati’s Pandu port in less than a month to rekindle hope for a transport system that had virtually ended with Partition in 1947. The Centre also signed a protocol with Bangladesh, which will allow Indian ships to access Mongla and Chittagong ports in the neighbouring country.But the expansion of railway and road network has been at a cost – shrinking of space for wildlife leading to train-hits and forcing elephants to seek non-traditional corridors. The resultant man-elephant conflicts have claimed the lives of 67 elephants and 75 humans. The year ended for Assam recording more human deaths due to conflict with animals than natural disasters. Data with the Assam State Disaster Management Authority said floods and landslides killed 53 people in 2018.last_img read more

13 days agoChelsea striker Giroud: I do not accept this situation

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Chelsea striker Giroud: I do not accept this situationby Paul Vegas13 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveOlivier Giroud admits he’s unhappy with his situation at Chelsea.The France international, who scored the only goal in Friday’s win over Iceland, has hinted at talks with Frank Lampard but insisted he would never seek to insult his manager.”Accept it? No, I do not accept it,” he told Le Pelerin.”You do not have to be fatalistic in certain situations. I have always been respectful and humble. Even if I do not agree with the coach, I do not criticise him.”But in myself, I cannot accept it because I know what I’m worth on a pitch. Last year, when I felt that I deserved to play, I asked the coach for explanations.” last_img read more

21 hours agoREVEALED: Man City rejected Bernardo Silva as teen

first_imgREVEALED: Man City rejected Bernardo Silva as teenby Paul Vegas21 hours agoSend to a friendShare the loveBernardo Silva was rejected by Manchester City as a teenager.Super agent Jorge Mendes touted the Portuguese star when he was an emerging force at Benfica but City opted not to make a move. In an extract from the book ‘Pep’s City: The making of a Superteam’ published by Goal, it was revealed that Mendes had said: “You need to realise that Bernardo’s going to become the best in the world.”He eventually joined the club for £43m. Silva, 25, has emerged as one of City’s most important players and was nominated on the long list for this year’s Ballon d’Or. About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

More GSAT Students Get Schools of Their Choice

first_imgSome 68 per cent of students, who sat the Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) in March 2013, have been placed in the schools of their choice.“There is a welcome increase in the number of students who will be placed in a high school according to the preference that their parents and themselves have made, and a smaller number who are placed according to their location and proximity,” Minister of Education, Hon. Rev. Ronald Thwaites has said.The Minister was speaking at a press briefing on June 18 at Gordon House, to release the results of the Grade Six Achievement Test.Rev. Thwaites further informed that a smaller proportion of the students were manually placed, as “none of their preferences can accommodate them, given their scores.”“This year more students will be placed at five-year high schools than ever before. Previously, there was a high proportion of those taking GSAT who were assigned to Junior High schools and to All Age schools and this year the percentage is significantly higher of those who will go to full high schools,” Mr. Thwaites said.Of the 42,268 students who sat the examination, 35,957 were placed in High Schools; 3,261 were placed in Technical schools; 1,769 were placed in Primary and Junior High; 40 in All Age schools; 18 in Special Schools and 105 in private institutions.The 2013 results for Social Studies (62.2 per cent) and Language Arts (63.1 per cent) show a marginal improvement over previous years. While the 2013 results for Mathematics (61.4 per cent), Science (63 per cent) and Communication Task (71.3 per cent ) show a slight decline, there have been steady improvements since 2009.Rev. Thwaites stressed that extreme care was taken to ensure that the 299 students who were affected by the misprint in the Mathematics paper were not at a disadvantage.He explained that in order to ensure fairness in the allocation of marks for the students affected, a well researched, robust and valid statistical method was used. He added that this was in keeping with the practice used by international examination bodies to treat with mishaps in examinations.“I want to indicate that the results hitherto described are still not good enough for us to become complacent. Slightly less than 40 per cent of our students are not at a level where they are going to be able to immediately engage fruitfully in the grade seven curriculum (and) that is of very great concern,” the Minister said.However, he added that there are significant changes that must take place in all levels of education, particularly in the areas of early preparation, so as to rectify the situation.A special intervention will be made for students who score grades below 50 per cent through a collaborative effort between the Ministry and the schools.The GSAT results will be made available to all Primary Schools on Thursday, June 20, 2013. Parents and students are also being reminded to accept their placements and make the best use of the opportunity that is provided in the schools that they are placed.The Grade Six Achievement Test was administered on March 21 and 22, 2013. The examination was conducted in over 1,000 schools and 43,546 students were eligible to sit the examination.Contact: Latonya Lintonlast_img read more

Womens Hockey No 7 Ohio State reopens conference play against No 1

Ohio State then-freshman goalie Andrea Braendli (30) prepares for a shot in the game against Minnesota State on Oct. 11. Ohio State won 4-0. Credit: Wyatt Crosher | Assistant Sports EditorThe Ohio State women’s hockey team is ready to prove that last year’s Frozen Four run was no fluke.The No. 7 Buckeyes (14-6, 8-4 Big Ten) will try to steal a win against No. 1 Wisconsin (19-1, 9-1 Big Ten) as they begin a home series against the Badgers on Friday.Ohio State will face a Wisconsin offense that is No. 2 in the country in goals and No. 1 in scoring margin.With the Badgers entering the weekend on an 11-game winning streak, the Buckeyes’ interim associate head coach Andrew Cassels said the series will test his team’s mettle.“It’s a great way to measure up our team versus the best team in the country,” Cassels said. “It’s going to show us where we are and how far we have to come. It’s a great challenge for the girls.”Ohio State is no stranger to defeating the Badgers. The Buckeyes claimed victories in their past two matchups against the Big Ten rival last year in February.“We had some success against them last year,” Cassels said. “We’ll take a lot of footage from that and try to put that into our game plan.”Cassels emphasized Wisconsin’s speed and said that blocking shots will be key to neutralizing its prolific offense, encouraging his team to get into shooting lanes and making sure the Badgers cannot easily get shots off.Coming on the heels of a three-game win streak, Ohio State’s standout freshman goalie Andrea Braendli said the Buckeyes don’t have many adjustments to make.“I don’t want to change my strategy,” Braendli said. “I have to play my game. The most important thing is that we have to trust each other. We have to have each other’s back.”Braendli, who is No. 8 in the nation with a .939 save percentage, said playing a highly touted conference rival such as Wisconsin provokes a higher sense of anticipation from the team, bringing an excitement to the Ohio State locker room ahead of the weekend.But Ohio State redshirt junior defenseman Jincy Dunne thinks it brings a higher expectation for the team, saying the Buckeyes defense will have to be aggressive in front of Braendli against the creative Wisconsin lines.“We have to be a nightmare to play against,” Dunne said. “We have to be all over them all the time, every second. Any time they’re around us, they’re not being untouched.”With Wisconsin outscoring opponents 81-23 on the season, Dunne said the Badgers defense has yet to face the type of challenge that the Buckeyes can give them.“I don’t think their defense has really had to play defense,” Dunne said. “They’re a very offensive-heavy team so if we can just get pressure on their defense and get pucks behind them, I think we’ll be very successful.”Dunne stressed the impact a series victory against the Badgers could have on the national perception of the Buckeyes. “It would be huge for us to get up in those rankings and show that the Frozen Four wasn’t a mishap,” Dunne said.The Buckeyes face Wisconsin in Columbus at 6:07 p.m. Friday at the OSU Ice Rink and again at 3:07 p.m. Saturday. read more