Colon isn’t counted on yet

first_imgColon, who suffered some rotator cuff damage last season, is throwing from flat ground with his graduation to a mound two or three weeks away at best. “There are some hurdles he needs to clear, but the time frame hasn’t changed that much from what we talked about,” Scioscia said. “I think it’s probably a stretch to see him ready by opening day.” TEMPE, Ariz. – While Bartolo Colon is aimed toward making the opening-day roster, manager Mike Scioscia hardly painted as optimistic a picture. Scioscia, speaking during a brief respite between staff meetings Wednesday, said he does not expect Colon to pitch in a Cactus League game this spring and would be happy simply if the right-hander threw from a mound before camp ended. The regular duo of play-by-play man Steve Physioc and color commentator Rex Hudler will be reduced to about 100 telecasts this season. The remaining 50 local broadcasts will be handled by play-by-play man Jose Mota and color commentator Mark Gubicza. The Angels agreed to contract terms with six players: right-handers Jose Arredondo and Steven Shell, infielder Matt Brown, outfielders Terry Evans and Nick Gorneault and catcher Bobby Wilson. Another 16 players on the 40-man roster are expected to be signed in the upcoming days. Juan Rivera’s broken leg in winter ball means Chone Figgins will continue to be on call for a number of positions, even though he is being aimed at the starting third base job. Scioscia said Figgins is being looked at as the probable fourth outfielder to go along with his third-base duties. Tommy Murphy and Reggie Willits also are vying for the backup outfielder job. There still is no further timetable on Rivera’s return. Scioscia expects him to be in Arizona for a examination by staff doctors possibly in two weeks. Rivera currently is being seen by a doctor in Florida. Kendry Morales, who had knee soreness in winter ball, was given clearance to begin camp on time. Position players report Monday with the first full-squad workout on Tuesday. Frankie Rodriguez has experienced visa problems the past few seasons which delayed his arrival in camp, but Scioscia does not foresee any late arrivals this year. doug.padilla@sgvn.com (626) 962-8811, Ext. 2731 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img The Angels are resigned to a best-case scenario of Colon pitching some time in the first half. While his return could happen by the start of May, it could be delayed into June if he can’t get rehabilitated and build stamina in short order. “You try to (think) for the long term, too,” Scioscia said. “He has to be stepped up to a certain pace to make sure he holds up for this year. And in the future, we want to be careful when moving forward.” Scioscia hinted that mound work could be two weeks away but quickly backed off that. “He’s got a good amount of work ahead of him before he gets on the mound,” he said. The Angels announced multiple telecast teams for the upcoming season. last_img read more

Bournemouth 2-1 QPR: Highlights of Rangers’ defeat against the Cherries

first_imgCharlie Austin returned to action but QPR missed another chance to put pressure on second-placed Burnley.See also:Austin returns but Rangers are beatenQPR must be ‘careful’ with Austin – HarryBournemouth v QPR player ratings Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

Timo Meier makes his country proud in Sharks win

first_imgSAN JOSE — Kevin Labanc celebrated his 200th NHL game the right way: scoring an overtime winner that propelled the Sharks into first place in the Western Conference.By completing their four-game homestand with a perfect record, the Sharks leapfrogged the Calgary Flames in the Pacific Division standings, erasing a seven-point deficit in just nine days. In the process, Joe Thornton moved into a tie with Stan Mikita for 14th place on the NHL’s all-time scoring list by potting his 1,467th career …last_img read more

Why you can’t second guess the A’s starting Sean Manaea over Mike Fiers

first_imgClick here if you’re unable to view the photo gallery on your mobile device.It didn’t take long for A’s fans to start writing revisionist history on Wednesday.That’s what happens when your team’s starting pitcher in a winner-take-all playoff game goes two innings and allows four runs, effectively torpedoing any chance of victory and ending the team’s season.After something like that it’s easy to second-guess manager Bob Melvin — or more accurately, the A’s front-office, as one has to think …last_img read more

Human Adaptation Can Be Rapid

first_imgHow long does it take for humans to adapt to environmental changes?  Some recent papers investigated this question.Paleface:  If it is assumed that humans started out medium or dark-skinned, how long did it take for Europeans to lose much of that original pigment?  An article in Science April 20 says maybe just 6,000 to 12,000 years.  “This contradicts a long-standing hypothesis that modern humans in Europe grew paler about 40,000 years ago, as soon as they migrated into northern latitudes,” the article states, reporting on a March meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.  Pale skin is said to have an adaptive value at high latitudes: “Under darker skies, pale skin absorbs more sunlight than dark skin, allowing ultraviolet rays to produce more vitamin D for bone growth and calcium absorption.”  The new date was based on genetic studies that suggested a “selective sweep occurred 5300 to 6000 years ago” or up to 12,000 years ago, “given the imprecision of method”.High life:  Ann Gibbons in Science reported on another discussion item from the American Association of Physical Anthropologists: how Tibetan children can tolerate the high altitude.  “Researchers seldom see Darwinian natural selection happening in living people,” she began.  “So physical anthropologist Cynthia Beall was delighted in 2004 when she discovered a trait that boosts the survival of some Tibetan children, apparently by raising the level of oxygen in their mothers’ tissues–a crucial advantage during pregnancy 4 kilometers above sea level.”  Updated research has revealed a genetic change that allows women to boost their blood volume and deliver more oxygen to the tissues.  Beall measured the selective pressure at 1:0.44, stronger than the fitness ratio measured for the sickle-cell gene.  They said, “the adaptation represents some of the strongest natural selection yet measured in humans.”    Surprisingly, this appears to be a different adaptation mechanism than that found in populations living in the Andes.  There, mothers are able to boost the amount of hemoglobin.  These correlations are uncertain, however; “it’s quite possible that the Tibetans have evolved more than one way to boost blood oxygen,” Beall cautioned.  Mark Gladwin threw in a Darwinian proverb: “Study the pregnant women, because that’s where you’ll see evolution in action.”Got milk?  Another strong selection effect in humans is for lactose tolerance.  Current Biology (April 17) had an article on this phenomenon, which “might have meant the difference between life and death” to early dairy farmers, Greg Gibson (North Carolina State U) said.  The admittedly imperfect ability to tolerate lactose represents another selective sweep some 5,000 to 10,000 years ago, about the time humans began to domesticate cattle.  He remarked, “It is hard to refute that this is a lovely example of the coevolution of genes and culture.”    Nevertheless, Gibson spent most of the article debunking the “thrifty genes” hypothesis of evolutionary selection.  This is a 45-year-old idea that the “high incidence of diabetes in modern humans is a result of positive selection for alleles that confer the ability to rapidly sequester rare caches of carbohydrates as fat that would tide us over during famine.”  This adaptation now works against us in our urbanized society, it is claimed: it tends us toward obesity.  So why does Gibson think this is a poor hypothesis?  “Unfortunately, these three preconditions for natural selection are all too often mistaken by adaptationists as both necessary and sufficient for evolution to occur,” he cautioned.  But we need to be more quantitative if sufficiency is to be proven.”  At the end, he was even more emphatic: “Those inclined toward Darwinian medicine like to explain disease as the price we pay for the beneficial effects of alleles that have accompanied human adaptation.  These cases of not-so-thrifty genes suggest though that we should not be so quick to jump on the bandwagon: the coevolution of genes and culture is tremendously more complex.”Funny he should mention Darwinian medicine.  A paper on that very subject appeared in Public Library of Science: Biology this month.  Catriona J. MacCallum tried again to make the case that medical doctors need to study evolution to understand disease (cf. 01/13/2003.  Distressed that medical schools are not considering evolution essential to the curriculum (see 06/25/2003), MacCallum wrote,It is curious that Charles Darwin, perhaps medicine’s most famous dropout, provided the impetus for a subject that figures so rarely in medical education.  Indeed, even the iconic textbook example of evolution—antibiotic resistance—is rarely described as “evolution” in relevant papers published in medical journals.  Despite potentially valid reasons for this oversight (e.g., that authors of papers in medical journals would regard the term as too general), it propagates into the popular press when those papers are reported on, feeding the wider perception of evolution’s irrelevance in general, and to medicine in particular.  Yet an understanding of how natural selection shapes vulnerability to disease can provide fundamental insights into medicine and health and is no less relevant than an understanding of physiology or biochemistry.MacCallum agreed that the “thrifty gene” concept has fallen into disfavor.  Some other evolutionary ideas are also simplistic: “The relationship between changing environment, diet, and susceptibility to disease, however, is also far from clear.”  Attempts to recreate a Stone-Age Diet “can be misleading,” she said.  Still, she promoted the idea that evolutionary concepts can help medical practice.  Granted, a mechanic may not need to understand the history of technology to fix a car, but an understanding of the evolutionary principles can help prepare for outbreaks of infectious disease, like bird flu, she argued.    Why the resistance to evolutionary teaching in medical schools?  In some cases, it’s the students who rebel:Although Paul O’Higgins thought a comparison of the brachial plexus to the pentadactyl limb was helpful, not all his students agreed—complaints were lodged that he was forcing evolution on them.  That lack of support was also reflected in the participation of only three medical students at the York meeting (albeit enthusiastic ones), despite being widely publicized.  It is not clear whether this is because medical students are more overburdened than most or because of a more deep-rooted resistance to the subject, reflecting wider political and religious prejudice against evolution.So what’s the solution?  “But evolutionary medicine isn’t and shouldn’t be controversial, and the best way to challenge prejudice is through education.”  She took refuge in the famous Dobzhansky quote, “Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution.”  As an experiment, let’s consider the three cases listed above.  It isn’t very controversial that survivors of lactose, decreased sunlight and oxygen will predominate in those environments, but aren’t they all still human?  Is this really the kind of evolution that Darwin meant?    MacCallum was undaunted by such questions.  “The time has clearly come for medicine to explicitly integrate evolutionary biology into its theoretical and practical underpinnings,” she ended with rhetorical flair.  “The medical students of Charles Darwin’s day did not have the advantage of such a powerful framework to inform their thinking; we shouldn’t deprive today’s budding medical talent of the potential insights to be gained at the intersection of these two great disciplines.”  Convincing the medical students of this may be the hard part.You do NOT want an evolutionary biologist in the room when you need TLC at the hospital.  Lying in bed with pain and weakness, you are not going to look like a fit individual who deserves to survive.    MacCallum again exhibited the shallowness and uselessness of evolutionary thinking.  Notice also the elitist snobbery: anyone who doesn’t agree with the Darwin Party Framework is prejudiced by definition, and must be sent to the re-education camp (cf. 12/21/2005).    Despite the pleas to pul-lease teach Darwin in medical school, medicine is doing fine without the help of Dropout Darwin.  Medicine has a multi-thousand year history that was advanced largely by Christians.  The examples she cited, including the “iconic textbook example” of evolution – antibiotic resistance (dealt a blow by Jonathan Wells in his book Icons of Evolution; see also the Darwinist confession from 09/12/2004) – are all just microevolutionary changes.  The three examples reported above are all microevolutionary changes.  Natural selection at the micro level is not the issue.  Even young-earth creationists accept that.    Such evidence has nothing to do with Darwin’s colossal simplistic generality, the Mystical Tree of Life (02/01/2007).  It has nothing to do with proving that humans have bacteria ancestors, and most medical students and professors know it.  You can almost hear the snickers of students in the classroom when the Prof tells his little fable about how the brachial plexus resembles the pentadactyl limb.  “Right, Teach.  Will that be on the test?  Can I take a pill and call you in the morning?”  Maybe the only way to get a higher turnout than three students at the next well-publicized “Medicine and Evolution” meeting is to award extra credit, provided the students are allowed to bring cots and pillows.    Despite the Dobzhansky rallying cry, things make perfect sense without evolution.  In none of the three cases listed above is Darwin vindicated or needed.  All the humans in those societies are still one species with the rest of humanity, capable of intermarrying and raising children.  What’s more, the adaptive changes observed did not take hundreds of thousands of years.  To the consternation of earlier Darwinists whose ideas are now discredited, the changes fit easily within a Biblical framework of human history.  What is Darwin’s score?  Even MacCallum admits that previous evolutionary ideas like “thrifty genes” have been discarded.  Is anything left that is not controversial and subject to overthrow?  We don’t need Darwin.  We don’t want Darwin.  We want to make sense in the light of the evidence, and help the weak in the process.(Visited 15 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Keep scouting for potato leafhoppers in alfalfa

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Rory Lewandowski, CCA, Mark Sulc, Kelley Tilmon, Ohio State University ExtensionIf you grow alfalfa, now is the time to scout those fields for potato leafhoppers. Integrated pest management (IPM) scouts are finding potato leafhoppers (PLH) widely distributed across a number of alfalfa fields. PLH numbers have ranged from low to well above economic treatment thresholds. In addition, alfalfa growers have been calling about yellow leaves on alfalfa, one of the classic PLH damage symptoms. Alfalfa growers should consider regular field scouting for PLH because this is one of the economically significant pests of alfalfa.The potato leafhopper is a small bright green wedge shaped insect that arrives in our area each year on storm fronts from the Gulf Coast region. PLH is a sucking insect. PLH feeding causes stunting of alfalfa plants resulting in yield loss. Excessive stress on plants by heavy PLH feeding can result in yield reductions in the current as well as subsequent cuttings. A common symptom of PLH feeding is a wedge-shaped yellowing of leaf tips. If you are noticing these symptoms, some damage has been done. Regular scouting can help to detect PLH earlier and determine if there is a need for a rescue treatment.Scouting involves the use of a sweep net. There is no other way to properly and accurately scout for PLH. The procedure is to take three to five samples for each 25 acres from random areas within the field. One sample consists of 10 pendulum sweeps. After the 10-sweep sample, carefully inspect the net contents and count the number of PLH adults and nymphs. For non-PLH resistant alfalfa varieties, treatment is warranted if the number of PLH adults and nymphs is equal to or greater than the average height of the alfalfa in inches.An OSU Extension fact sheet on PLH is available on-line at https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/ENT-33. A short video clip on how to scout for PLH and use a sweep net to sample for PLH is available at http://tiny.cc/PLHscouting featuring Mark Sulc, OSU Extension Forage Specialist.last_img read more

The Green Architects Chat With James Howard Kunstler

first_imgPODCAST: An Interview With Martin Holladay, Part 1Ringside Seats on an Urban Planning RivalryIn Search of the Green EconomySlums of the Future The official transcript of the show is available to GBA PRO members. To become a member (or to take a free 10 day trial), go to the member sign up page. Subscribe to Green Architects’ Lounge on iTunes—you’ll never miss a show, and it’s free! You know how occasionally the comments section that follows certain blogs drifts off into “Big Picture” territory? When we do a podcast on something simple like air sealing or home energy monitoring, for some reason someone has to bring up population control, lack of focus on urban retrofits, or how Frank Loyd Wright was a racist. (For the record, I’m not trying to bring that one up again—so let’s leave it alone, please.)Anyway, this one’s for you, “Big Picture People.”Phil and I were very pleased to have James Howard Kunstler on for a discussion about where we’re headed as a nation and the role we architects, designers, and planners play.The HighlightsA Black Irish: Our drink (due to a last-minute change of plans). While recording, we wondered if this is a racist or slanderous term. Even after Googling it, I’m still not certain. We mean no offense. It’s a black drink (Kahlua added to Irish whiskey).What’s going to hit us first: the downfall of our global economy or the end of cheap oil? After some discussion, Jim seems to lean toward economic downfall, given recent history.center_img Is the Occupy Wall Street movement going to have an effect? Jim discusses how the seed has been planted. Regardless of what happens, if anything, it has entered the consciousness of our culture.Is “green” a real movement? It began as a genuine movement, but Jim talks about its history and its co-option.New Urbanists vs. landscape-as-artists. Plenty of name-dropping (and name-calling) here. Good stuff.Who’s got a good bead on the right path forward? The New Urbanists, who are trying to correct the poor choices our society has been making for decades. The details are fascinating.Jim’s place. Phil and I were curious about where and how a guy with such dynamic visions for the future chooses to live.What’s the public’s impression of architects? We discuss the architect’s “PR problem.”What would Jim tell the architects and builders out there? We don’t need more “mystifying” buildings. And also, no more skyscrapers. A green skyscraper is a contradiction in terms, and possibly not for the reasons you’d imagine.Is there an architect out there doing great work? New Urbanists like Victor Dover. Jim explains why.Are any of our leaders on the right track? For Jim, one economist came to mind: Laurence Kotlikoff , of Boston University. Political leadership is failing. Architecture is failing (e.g., Rem Koolhaus’s “prank” on Harvard). Jim likens our current condition to that of the late 1850s. He explains.Will technology save us or bury us? Jim talks about his upcoming book, Too Much Magic, and the concepts behind this tenuous relationship with technology and the drastic mistakes we’re making.Be sure to visit James Howard Kunstler’s web page. There you can find links to his blogs, books, articles, paintings, and podcast. (If you subscribe to ours, chances are more than likely you’ll enjoy his as well.) Phil and I are especially fond of his Eyesore of the Month blog. Be sure to check it out. He also has a nice TED Talks Presentation, wherein he dissects suburbia. And of course he had a nice appearance on The Colbert Report.As usual, Phil shares a song at the end that he believes we should be listening to in the studio. This episode it’s “Holy Holy” by Wye Oak.Cheers! RELATED CONTENTlast_img read more

Resource Discovery: Childhood Maltreatment Effects on the Brain

first_imgBy Kacy Mixon, M.S., LMFT“Maltreatment during childhood can lead to long-term changes in brain circuits that process fear, researchers say. This could help explain why children who suffer abuse are much more likely than others to develop problems like anxiety and depression later [in life].”We have discussed effects of trauma on children in previous posts. Today’s Resource Discovery focuses on new research findings that add to the numerous effects that children often experience. A recent National Public Radio (NPR) broadcast of All Things Considered reported findings from a study exploring the effects of childhood maltreatment on the brain. Researchers found that abuse experienced in childhood can change brain circuits that process fear and show connection to adolescents developing symptoms of depression and anxiety. Furthermore, girls demonstrated increased vulnerability to brain changes caused by stress or trauma. For more information on this study, listen to the full web broadcast here. This post was written by Kacy Mixon, M.S., LMFT, Social Media Specialist.  She is a member of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more

How Well Do You Know the Characteristics of Military Caregivers?

first_imgResources:National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. Afghanistan and Iraq (OEF & OIF) Health Risks. Retrieved from We Honor Veterans on August 12, 2018.National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. Gulf War Health Risks. Retrieved from We Honor Veterans on August 12, 2018.National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. Korean War Health Risks. Retrieved from We Honor Veterans on August 12, 2018.National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. World War II Health Risks. Retrieved from We Honor Veterans. on August 12, 2018.Ramchand, R., Tanielian, T., Fisher, M., Vughan, C., Trail, T., Epley, C. V., . . . Robinson, E. G.-D. (2014). Hidden Heroes, Americans Military Caregivers. Santa Monica: Rand Corporation.U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Vietnam War Exposures. Retrieved from Public Health on August 12, 2018: Written by: Mary Brintnall-Peterson, Ph.D., MBP Consulting, LLC, Professor Emeritus, University of Wisconsin – ExtensionLet’s have some fun taking a short quiz to see how well you know the characteristics of military caregivers. You will be asked a question and the correct answer will follow. Information for this quiz was taken from the comprehensive study of military caregivers, Hidden Heroes, American’s Military Caregivers, funded by the Rand Corporation (Ramchand, et al., 2014) The study divided military caregivers into two groups and compared them to civilian caregivers and non-caregivers. Pre-9/11 caregivers are defined as those who care for a soldier who became ill or injured before 9/11 (i.e. Vietnam, World War I and II, the Korean conflict, etc.), post 9/11 caregivers are those who care for a soldier who served after 9/11 (i.e. the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts). A civilian caregiver cares for an individual who has never served in the military and a non-caregiver is an individual who is not providing care to anyone. Let’s look at the questions:1. Military caregivers are what percentage of all caregivers in the United States?A. 42%B. 8 %C. 24%Answer: C or 24%.There are 22.6 million caregivers in the United States (9.4% of the adult population) with 5.5 million caring for someone who served in the military. This means military caregivers make up 24% of all caregivers. Military caregivers are divided in two groups with a majority (80.4%) caring for someone pre-9/11 and the other 19.6% caring for a post 9/11 soldier. Seven percent of the adult population in the United States provide care for an adult over 18.2. Which descriptions best describes the characteristics of post 9/11 military caregivers?A. Post 9/11 caregivers are younger, non-white women caring for a spouse.B. Post 9/11 caregivers are older white women caring for a parent.Answer: A Because there has been an increase in minorities volunteering to serve their country, it stands to reason that the number of non-white caregivers would be larger than in the past. Forty-three percent of post 9/11 military caregivers are minorities (10% black, 21% Hispanic and 10% other, non-Hispanic and 2% multiple, non-Hispanic) compared to 25% of pre-9/11 caregivers. It should be noted that 36% of civilian caregivers are non-white.Finding out the relationship of the caregiver to the soldier is critical as there are differences between spousal caregivers and caregivers caring for an adult child. Post 9/11 caregivers are mostly spouses (33%) with an additional 25% being parents while 36% of pre- 9/11 caregivers are parents and only 22% are spouses. Age is another key factor to find out as there are differences between caregiver groups. A majority of all caregivers are between the ages of 31-55. Post 9/11 caregivers have a higher percentage of younger caregivers than all the other caregiver groups.  Thirty seven percent of post 9/11 military caregivers are between the ages of 18-30 years old with pre-9/11 caregivers having only 11% and civilian caregivers having 16%.3. Is the length of a military caregiver’s journey longer or shorter than civilian caregivers?A. LongerB. ShorterC. No differencesAnswer: C. No differencesMany studies have reported that military caregivers provide care two times longer than other caregivers. Yet new findings suggest that there aren’t any statistical differences in length of the caregiver journey between pre- 9/11, post 9/11 and civilian caregivers. All caregivers provided care for more than one year with 10-16% being a caregiver for at least eleven years. This new data suggests that military caregivers are not in that role as long as previously determined. This data is expected to change as post 9/11 caregivers continue to provide care to soldiers who became ill or injured when they were in their 20s and 30s.4. The type of care a military caregiver provides is dependent on which war/conflict they were in and if the soldier was injured or became ill due to their service?A. TrueB. FalseAnswer: A. TrueThe type of injuries or illnesses each soldier encounters depends on the war/conflict they participated in. The National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization fact sheets on the health risks of soldiers by the different wars and conflicts are summarized below. Knowing the possible health risks by war or conflict provides you with insights into what the caregiver may be experiencing.World War II soldiers were exposed to tuberculosis, rheumatic fever, hepatitis and tropical disease. Besides infectious diseases and wounds they encountered frostbite.Korean veterans suffer from cold injuries including frostbite and trench foot. Cold related problems increase the probability that the veteran will be at risk for amputation because of peripheral vascular disease or diabetes.Vietnam veterans came in contact with malaria, tropical diseases, and the ramifications of Agent Orange or other herbicides. These veterans are also at risk for hepatitis C.Gulf war soldiers were exposed to chemical and biological agents along with concentrations of smoke from burning oil wells. Many have been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as “Lou Gehrig’s” disease and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).Iraq and Afghanistan conflict soldiers experienced amputation, burns, traumatic brain injury (TBI), post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and often have multiple health concerns. PTDS and TBI are invisible wounds making it even more difficult for caregivers to provide careDid you get all the answers correct? Were you surprised at some of the answers? By understanding the “norms” for the various types of caregivers you’ll be able to determine if the caregiver is having a different or unusual experience than others in similar situations. This knowledge will help you determine the questions to ask the caregiver and which resources and supports to suggest. One resource you might want to add to your library is Hidden Heroes, American’s Military Caregivers. last_img read more

Shes Gotta Have It Lyriq Bent Cast As A Male Lead In

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitter Facebook Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img Rookie Blue alum Lyriq Bent has been cast as male leads opposite DeWanda Wise in Spike Lee’s 10-episode Netflix series She’s Gotta Have It, a contemporary update of Lee’s groundbreaking 1986 indie film.The series centers on Darling (Wise), a Brooklyn-based a sexually liberated, free spirited painter/mixed media artist in her late 20s struggling to define herself and divide her time amongst her friends, her job and her three lovers, played by Bent, Cleo Anthony and Anthony Ramos. Login/Register With: Advertisementlast_img read more