Giants call up shortstop prospect Mauricio Dubon, report says

first_imgCLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos on a mobile device The Giants are calling up a highly-touted prospect as they try to stay in the hunt for the National League’s second Wild Card spot.Infielder Mauricio Dubon, acquired at the trade deadline in exchange for pitchers Drew Pomeranz and Ray Black, is set to join the Giants according to Brewers reporter Robert Murray.“When the (trade) rumors came out, I was excited,” Dubon told The Bay Area News Group on Monday in West …last_img read more

In London, voting for South Africa

first_img16 April 2009 Twenty-five years ago, the crowds that gathered in Trafalgar Square to protest and demonstrate against apartheid South Africa played a major role in galvanising international opinion against apartheid and hastening its downfall. Yesterday, South Africans gathered in their thousands in orderly queues to have their say in the future of the democratic South Africa in the same place that the demonstrators once stood. With 7&nbps;427 South African voters marking their crosses in 12 hours, the South African High Commision in London was not only the country’s largest voting station abroad, but was also nearly twice the size of the largest one in South Africa – Joubert Park in Johannesburg with between 3 000 to 4 000 voters, according to the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC). I have never seen such a large group of South Africans behaving in such a subdued manner. Perhaps it had something to do with being in the historic Trafalgar Square on an overcast – and sometimes wet – London spring day. Perhaps it had something to do with the the tiny figure of Lord Nelson on his towering column peering out over Parliament Square, where an animated statue of our own Nelson Mandela is flanked by the likes of Winston Churchill, Margaret Thatcher and General Jan Smuts, the only other South African in the Square. Perhaps, it had to do with the fact that it was very early in the morning. But I suspect it had more to do with the reverence of voting – the universal way for ordinary citizens to have a say in their country and the future. They queued ten-deep across Trafalgar Square and the length of the facade of the iconic South Africa House. It was a day on which South Africans filed onto South African soil in unprecedented numbers thanks to a decision by the Constitutional Court – the cornerstone of South Africa’s democracy – which required government to extend voting facilities to all South Africans abroad who are on the voters roll. They waited quietly, patiently, reading the latest copy of The South African, chatting quietly about why they were in the UK, why they were voting, exchanging their memories, hopes and fears for their beloved country. It also took me back to 1994 when I had felt so priveleged to be part of the first election in which all South Africans were able to vote – most for the first time. The long queues snaked sometimes for kilometres and many South Africans got to know each other for the first time as they waited for hours to make their crosses. Back then it was both a deeply moving , humbling and empowering experience. And so it was again yesterday. This time, the voters were mainly young, mainly white and all were united by the decision to have a say in their country and in choosing the next government. It also took me back to the mid-1980s, when I served as a correspondent for the South African morning group of newspapers – including the Rand Daily Mail and the Cape Times – when I covered almost constant demonstrations and protests by South African exiles and large numbers of committed members of the British public who played such a crucial role in ending apartheid. Seldom in the history of freedom struggles has there been such a display of international solidarity by a nation as was the case with the British public’s involvement in the Anti-Apartheid Movement. Today photographic records of those protests are displayed on the walls of South African House and many famous faces are still recognisable – Thabo Mbeki, the late Harold Wilson, the late Archbishop Trevor Huddleston, Abdul Minty, Peter Hain, the alte Mike Terry and many more. As I stood waiting and chatting to fellow South Africans, I was humbled that we would not be standing there voting in a democratic election in South Africa had it not been for the suffering and sacrifice of thousands of South Africans in resisting apartheid for all those years . Many gave their lives, many sacrificed family members and friends. I was overcome by a deep humility tinged with pride. John Battersby is UK Country Manager of the International Marketing Council of South Africa and former editor of the Sunday Independent.last_img read more

Great astronomy, with or without SKA

first_imgThe KAT-7 radio telescope array isoperational and has produced its firstimages. The SKA site, near Carnarvon in theNorthern Cape, is in the middle ofa proclaimed radio astronomy reserve. No mobile phones or other electronicdevices are permitted in the reserve. Prof Justin Jonas is optmistic about SouthAfrica’s chances of winning the SKA bid.(Images: Janine Erasmus) MEDIA CONTACTS • Tommy Makhode  Dept of Science and Technology  +27 12 843 6793 or +27 82 379 8268• Marina Joubert  SKA South Africa communications  +27 83 409 4254 RELATED ARTICLES • SA’s SKA takes another step forward • MeetKAT in demand among scientists • Space science thriving in SA • Gallery: the KAT-7 radio telescope • SA assists with Nasa’s Mars missionJanine ErasmusSouth Africa is one of two finalists bidding to host the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), and with its rival Australia is awaiting the recommendation of the SKA Site Advisory Committee, due in February 2012.But whether or not the US$1.9-billion ($15.9-billion) project goes ahead, the local astronomy sector has already made huge strides.Speaking in Cape Town in December, South Africa’s deputy science and technology minister Derek Hanekom said that the SKA project has got the country’s brightest young minds excited about astronomy.Hanekom added that the SKA is a major catalyst for human capital development in relevant fields, and with over 300 bursaries already awarded to students from around the continent, has been a scientific boon for South Africa and other African countries.“With the equipment already developed and built, South Africa has proven its scientific capability,” he said, “and has shown that it is a country that can play a pioneering role in science.”When complete, the SKA will comprise some 3 000 radio antennae, spread out over a vast area of Southern Africa. South Africa will host the core of the array, comprising about half the dishes, and it and eight partner countries in the region will accommodate the remainder.The first astronomical observations, expected in 2019, will help to answer long-standing questions such as the formation of the universe; why it’s expanding; the possibility of life on other planets; and the mystery of dark energy and dark matter.Ground-breaking technologyAt the isolated Northern Cape site which has been set aside for the SKA, an array of seven dishes is already operational – this is the Karoo Array Telescope, or KAT-7.The KAT-7 is a precursor to the larger 64-dish MeerKAT array, which itself is a precursor to the SKA.A ground-breaker in its own right, KAT-7 is the first radio telescope to consist of fibreglass dishes.These were produced on-site from a mould, and the same manufacturing facility will be expanded to accommodate the larger MeerKAT dishes, using local ingenuity and skills.MeerKAT is Afrikaans, meaning “more KAT”, but is also the name of an endearing little mongoose-like mammal that is indigenous to the Northern Cape and other Southern African regions.When completed in 2018, MeerKAT will be among the five largest radio telescopes in the world.Hanekom stressed that the MeerKAT construction will go ahead, whether or not the SKA is awarded to South Africa.“Great astronomy work will be done, with or without the SKA,” he said.Hanekom also said that the knowledge that has already been amassed is invaluable, and that the project has given rise to a new generation of scientists. The unprecedented scientific opportunities are expected to keep South African talent in the country, and attract expertise from overseas.The KAT-7 has caused much excitement in the local astronomy community with the capture of images of the Centaurus A galaxy and its associated black hole, located 14-million light years from Earth.But scientists are looking further ahead, and are queuing up to book research time on MeerKAT, which will be the largest radio telescope in the southern hemisphere. Already five years’ worth of observation time have been allocated to ten research projects, ranging from a study of radio pulsars to a high-frequency survey of the galactic plane.South Africa leading the wayProfessor Justin Jonas, SKA associate director for science and engineering, and head of Rhodes University’s physics and electronics department, is excited about the opportunities that lie ahead.He said that astronomy has been identified by the government as one of the fields in which South Africa is likely to succeed, because of geographic, natural and knowledge advantages.“We must have aspirations for cutting-edge science,” he said, “or we will always be viewed as a second-class nation.”Jonas said that South Africa’s government is wholly committed to the SKA and its related projects. The African Union has also stated its support for the project, and it is hoped that this will be one of a number of factors that gives South Africa an edge over Australia.The government has declared the entire Northern Cape province to be an astronomy advantage area, through the Astronomy Geographic Advantage Act of 2007. The only exemption is the Sol Plaatje Municipality, which encompasses Kimberley.Within the province, an area of 12.5 million hectares was proclaimed a radio astronomy reserve, and anyone entering must switch off their mobile and other electronic devices. Survey results show that the reserve is one of the quietest environments on earth, in terms of radio frequency, for radio astronomy. This makes it an ideal location for the sensitive SKA.The legislation means that any development that might interfere with the reception of radio signals must first be carefully considered.This high-level support has enabled South African scientists to leap ahead of their international colleagues in areas such as rapid prototyping.“For example, with our dishes we can now go from an engineering diagramme to an on-site antenna in less than a year,” said Jonas.Innovations in astronomy, he said, are helping to drive development in other industries.He mentioned another significant South African achievement – the second-generation Roach board, designed and produced locally.Roach is the reconfigurable open architecture computing hardware board that can be adapted to all kinds of digital signal processing requirements, including medical or telecommunications applications.“Roach 1 is now being used in every radio telescope in the world,” said Jonas. ”It can replace an entire rack of computers, and use a twentieth of the energy.”Because the development team has released the Roach design under an open source licence, the plans can be freely downloaded and used for an increasing number of applications, while the international development community grows.“The software is the key to getting the most out of Roach,” said Jonas.The KAT-7 uses Roach 1, but MeerKAT will most likely use Roach 3. Roach 1 was developed in collaboration with engineers from the University of California, Berkeley.last_img read more

Local presence at global film event

first_imgBesides the screenings of documentaries, the IDFA also holds debate forums for industry experts. The festival is widely marketed throughout Amsterdam before and during its run. Workshops for aspiring filmmakers are presented by those who have been in the industry for a while. (Images: IDFA) MEDIA CONTACTS • Naomi Mokhele   National Film and Video Foundation   +27 11 483 0880 RELATED ARTICLES • SA film wins international award • Local flair for Sydney film fest • Cannes triumph for South African films • Big grant for African filmmakers • The best of African cinema onlineValencia TalaneAs many as 34 local filmmakers have made their way to the International Documentary Festival Amsterdam (IDFA) – with 22 documentaries in tow – to showcase locally made productions at the prestigious event.It is the largest South African industry delegation yet to take works to an international festival or market. Working with the support of the National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF), the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and the Documentary Filmmakers’ Association (DFA), the filmmakers will be able to network with producers and filmmakers from the Netherlands and around the world.The Devil’s Lair and The Dream of Sharahrazad, directed by Riaan Hendricks and Francois Verster respectively, are just two of the productions that will be screened. A post-production dinner will also be hosted by the South Africans, which will include performances by a DJ and pantsula dancers from African Cypher, a documentary that won accolades at the 2012 Durban International Film Festival.A 36-year-old ex-convict and gang leader from the Cape Flats is the subject of The Devil’s Lair. It follows him along his path of self-discovery, during which he confronts his violent past while at the same time tries to take care of his young family. His environment, the often violent Cape Flats, presents challenges for the man in his attempts to achieve a balance between the demands of his two roles.Worlds away, The Dream of Sharahrazad takes the viewer through the Arab Spring, as revolutions in several Arabic countries in 2011 have come to be known. It explores the changes in Egypt, Turkey and Lebanon, using the famous story collection, One Thousand and One Nights, or Arabian Nights.“We are very grateful to once again be part of this amazing platform,” said the NFVF’s chief executive, Zama Mkosi. “The IDFA provides us with yet another opportunity to take local projects to the world, which is one of our key objectives.”The IDFA is the biggest documentary film festival in the world, and every year it accepts documentaries from around the world for screening. To be chosen, the films need to meet certain criteria such as relevance of the topic, execution of the project and appeal to the audience.The DTI’s Export Marketing and Investment Assistance (EMIA) scheme works with filmmakers to help expose local productions to a wider market, as well as to assist their efforts to break into the international market. A member of the DFA board, Mayenzeke Baza, said initiatives like the EMIA were important for the growth, development and transformation of the industry in South Africa.They helped to expose emerging and previously disadvantaged filmmakers to different markets, he said, and opportunities to sell their products to international broadcasters and funders.“The documentary film genre is unique,” said Baza. “It stimulates public discourse, reflects on social, political, cultural and current events, explores history, commemorates heritage and unearths the mysteries of the universe and the planet.”The IDFA opens on 13 November and runs until 24 November. Slideshow image is of a scene from The Devil’s Lair, and is courtesy of Vimeolast_img read more

Press release: South Africa drops three places in nation brand index

first_imgBrand South Africa released South Africa’s performance in the 2017 Anholt-GfK Nation Brands Index (NBI), which sees South Africa’s ranking dropping by three points from 35th to 38th out of 50 nations overall.South Africa’s ranking in the 2017 Anholt Nation Brand Index has dropped three places.Johannesburg, Tuesday 05 December 2017 – The NBI measures six pillars: Exports, Governance, Immigration & Investment – which are considered a country’s hard performance measures; as well as Culture, People and Tourism – which are considered a country’s soft powers.While the country’s ranking slides back three positions, it is important to note that in terms of its statistical score, we see an improvement of 0.73 in comparison to last year’s results. Furthermore, the statistical scores in each of the six pillars also improves, with the strongest upward movement in People, Immigration & Investment, and Governance pillars.Brand South Africa’s General Manager for Research, Dr Petrus de Kock presented the details of the findings at a recent South African Competitiveness Forum hosted by Brand South Africa – which was a consultative platform with South African Multinationals,State Owned Entities, and Exporters to discuss how to position the Nation Brand.Commenting on the NBI results, Brand South Africa’s CEO, Dr Kingsley Makhubela said: “From the 2017 NBI it becomes apparent that there are no short-cuts to the development of a reputable global reputation. There are two dimensions to this, firstly, by spending on pure marketing which will enhance a country’s reputation, and secondly, a country’s contribution to the global arena, and how this is received/perceived by audiences, is a determining factor in shaping a Nation’s brand reputation.”The NBI study results also indicate that South Africans have a strong positive self-perception, placing their home country 19th overall, 6th for Culture, 7th for Tourism, and 4th for People.“While the self-perception of the Nation Brand is relatively healthy (with the exception of governance) it is interesting to observe which nations rank South Africa better and/or worse the previous year. In this regard nations such as Japan, South Korea, and Turkey,and to a lesser degree, Egypt has a relatively negative perception of South Africa.“South Africa is notably strong in India, Germany, France, and the UK. Although the following countries have varied perceptions of South Africa across the pillars, Argentina, Australia, Brazil, Italy, and Sweden show a generally positive disposition towards the country.However, governance, and perceptions of investment & immigration environments, are areas which call for much improvement,” added Dr Makhubela.Brand South Africa tracks a wide variety of indices, reputation indicator studies, and commissioned research to monitor the nation brand’s competitiveness and reputation standings. The Nation Brand Index (NBI) is an important instrument through which Brand South Africa can track perceptions of South Africa, on the six pillars of the Nation Brand Hexagon.last_img read more

Bret Davis elected to American Soybean Governing Committee

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio Soybean Association board member, Bret Davis of Delaware County, was elected to serve on the Governing Committee of the American Soybean Association. Bret joins farmers from around the country who will work to represent the legislative and policy interests of U.S. soybean farmers.“We congratulate Bret on being elected to the Governing Committee,” said Adam Graham, OSA president and Logan County farmer. “He has been a great leader here in Ohio and I know he will work hard to represent U.S. soybean farmers well.”Bret Davis farms on Davis Farms near Delaware where he grows over 3,000 acres of soybeans and corn. He serves on both the OSA and Ohio Soybean Council Board of Trustees and is in his second term with ASA. Bret has served as OSA President, Chairman, Vice President and Treasurer. He holds a designation as a Certified Crop Advisor and is a past president of both the FSA Board and the Delaware County Farm Bureau. He was a member of the FFA and earned his American FFA Degree.last_img read more

Pitching Without a Pitch Deck

first_imgaudrey watters Tags:#start#tips Startups often put a lot of work into a pitch deck. That’s not necessarily a bad thing. After all, you don’t want to be stuck delivering a presentation to potential investors which is eminently awful because of your slides.But here’s a piece of advice that may run counter to “build good slides.” And that’s “be ready to ditch the slides altogether.”To do so certainly demands that you’re ready and able to deliver a compelling story and demo in order to pitch your startup.Primers and Pitch DecksInvestor Mark Suster wrote a post last week, a primer on raising VC funds. Part of the post addresses the pitch deck, including what slides he recommends you include in it. A problem definition, details on the solution, a bio of top 3 people in the company, market size, exit possibilities, and so on — all in hort sentences, bullet points, easy to read. (Read the whole post. I’m not doing it justice here.)Following Suster’s post, several other investors wrote responses arguing that, while Suster’s recommendations for VC fundraising were solid, the pitch deck wasn’t necessarily something that they cared too much about.Bryce Roberts of O’Reilly AlphaTech Ventures responded with his argument for a “secret weapon” – the whiteboard. Rather than deliver a pitch that echoes the same format of multitudes of other presentations – one during which your audience is more likely to tune out simply because the format is so predictable – consider stepping up to a whiteboard for a different, more active sort of presentation.“When an entrepreneur steps to the whiteboard the energy in the room totally changes. There’s movement, there’s action, there’s something happening that requires attention. The conversation moves from consuming images on a screen in lean back mode, to active engagement. Half baked ideas get refined, new ideas emerge and a two way dialog develops where a one way homologue once was,” writes Roberts.Telling Your Story to InvestorsJason Baptiste, whose startup OnSwipe just raised $1 million in a seed round led by Spark Capital and Betaworks, agrees.He too stresses the importance of being able to step away from a reliance on the PowerPoint slides in order to engage more actively with potential investors. Baptiste said that OnSwipe found great success in being able to deliver a strong demo along with a compelling story. While he says he did have a pitch deck, he and his co-founders offered to skip it, something that investors readily agreed to, during the pitch.Baptiste echoes Roberts, arguing that by freeing oneself from the presentation mode that a PowerPoint seems to dictate, he was able to give a much more engaging pitch to potential investors.The funding for OnSwipe was raised in a marathon 30 days, something Baptise says the company was able to do by really targeting the right funds – those interested in media and tech. (Baptiste’s startup OnSwipe is a publishing platform for tablets.) But this too points to the way in which the entrepreneurs were able to enter the room with potential investors and engage in a compelling presentation – without relying on slides to tell their story or demo their product. Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…last_img read more

Boulder Commons Sets New Standard for Net-Zero Leases

first_imgBridging the landlord-tenant divideAt Boulder Commons, Morgan Creek Ventures worked with RMI and its counsel, the legal team at Holland & Hart, to develop a first-of-its-kind lease structure that built a strong business case for both tenants and landlords to actively contribute to meet the development’s net-zero goals.This process resulted in a lease that allocates a budget for factors like energy use or transportation that could make or break the development’s ability to meet energy demands through on-site renewable energy sources (in this case, a 596-kW PV system) on an annual basis. So, for example, RMI is incentivized to stay within its plug load energy budget of 7 kBtu/sq. ft. If RMI exceeds this budget, it will be charged a fee to offset this overage with renewable energy certificates (RECs), and be required to meet with the landlord to discuss ways to more proactively manage energy use. This establishes a win-win situation, because RMI has full control over how this energy budget is allocated and managed through plug loads, and Morgan Creek Ventures can more accurately size its PV system because it knows what types of loads to expect.Transportation-related emissions are treated similarly. Unbundled parking in the lease, where the costs for parking are separated from the cost for space rent, incentivizes RMI to use alternative commuting. If RMI’s staff commute by public transportation, carpooling, or riding their bikes instead of using personal vehicles, over time RMI will pay less in rent as parking spaces are turned back over to the landlord to be put on the market. (Parking costs account for approximately 13% of RMI’s total lease cost.)“For RMI, Boulder Commons is a great choice because it is in line with our mission. This will also attract many other companies that may not even care about sustainability or energy because it is simply a better space, and less expensive than comparable buildings in the area that don’t perform as well,” said Cara Carmichael, a manager with RMI’s buildings program. “Developing the net-zero lease was particularly exciting because we created something new. There is no template.” Growing the net-zero movementIt was only one year ago when RMI opened the doors to its very own beyond net- zero energy Innovation Center in Basalt, Colorado. This 15,610-square-foot owner-occupied office and convening center has since garnered national and international attention as the highest performing building in the coldest climate zone in North America.The new agreement reached at Boulder Commons enables RMI to not only continue to “walk the talk,” but to also advance the entire building industry with market-based solutions to net-zero buildings, developments, and districts.Net-zero buildings have experienced a boom in popularity over the past year. A report from New Buildings Institute revealed a 74% increase in certified and emerging net-zero buildings from 2015 to 2016. But despite industry progress, the number of leased net-zero buildings lags significantly behind owner-occupied projects. This presents a challenge to the industry’s long-term growth and viability.Although the value proposition for an owner-occupied net-zero building is clear (lower energy and maintenance costs, higher employee productivity, and fewer employee sick days), the value proposition for both landlords and tenants in a leased building depends on a more complex relationship.How do you true up energy use and costs on a monthly basis when they are typically calculated on an annual basis? How does a developer recoup the investment from a PV system when traditionally tenants pay a monthly bill to an electric utility and landlords have committed to buying less, not more? How can tenants prioritize energy efficiency when they manage and control only a small portion of the energy-using infrastructure and equipment? And conversely, how can landlords encourage tenants to save energy, particularly as plug loads overtake lighting to become the driving end use in net-zero energy buildings?Managing these complexities while giving shared net-zero goals “legal teeth” is where the net-zero lease comes in. RELATED ARTICLES Creating a net-zero lease model for othersOnly a handful of other developers are actively developing net-zero multi-tenant projects, and we consulted with all of them on their process, cost structure, and lessons learned.According to Carmichael, one of the biggest challenges with NZE buildings — and an area where there was truly no precedent in leased spaces — was the need to build ongoing annual energy reviews into the lease to enable continuous improvements in the building’s operations. This led to a lease requirement around base building commissioning, and a continued dialogue about other means to explore efficiency with each tenant in the building.Another groundbreaking component of the lease is its treatment of offsets. At Boulder Commons, any energy purchased from the utility is required to be offset with RECs. But, committing to a single compliance path — especially when spread over a potential eight-year lease term — made project financiers uncomfortable because of long-term price uncertainty. Therefore, RMI negotiated that alternative offsets for any “dirty” power used could be implemented, including community solar, white tags (energy efficiency certificates), green power directly from the utility, or other “clean” energy attributes.“We’ve pushed the concept of net zero in lease scenarios and established completely new ways of billing tenants for operating building use,” said Carmichael. “By having this as a model for others to use, it goes a long way. The more prototypes we can celebrate, the more confidence we’ll inspire among developers and financiers that net zero is not only a better standard environmentally but a better standard economically, as demand for high-performance buildings continues to outpace supply.” My Net Zero ConundrumZero-Energy Construction Is ‘Set to Explode’ The Department of Energy Chooses a Definition for Net ZeroA Business Model for Net-Zero Energy DistrictsNet-Zero-Energy versus PassivhausCalifornia Leads the Nation in Net-Zero Projects © 2017 Rocky Mountain Institute. Published with permission. Originally posted on RMI Outlet. Kelly Vaughn is RMI’s marketing manager. Just two miles from downtown Boulder, Colorado, a new net-zero energy (NZE) development is under construction: Boulder Commons. The project consists of two commercial buildings totaling roughly 100,000 square feet of professional office space and boasting a restaurant, coffee shop, and community gathering flex space — all accessible by Boulder’s vast trail and public transportation network.Rocky Mountain Institute’s Boulder-based employees will be proud to call 14,000 square feet of this development home upon project completion this fall. But perhaps more exciting than the organization’s forthcoming move is a recent major milestone involving the building owner, Morgan Creek Ventures: the signing of the first net-zero lease in the state of Colorado, and the first net-zero lease for any multi-tenant development of this size.“Boulder Commons is setting a new bar for sustainability, and our tenants share the belief that how we act as a company matters,” said Andrew Bush from Morgan Creek Ventures. “Having RMI as an anchor tenant as well as a partner in developing a lease structure that aligned landlord and tenant goals and incentives around net zero on an annual basis pushed us further than we could have ever gone ourselves.”last_img read more

5 DIY Tips for Your Next Shoot

first_imgHere are a few other DIY posts from PremiumBeat worth checking out:10 Cheap Tripod Dolly Options to Try at HomeMake Your Own DIY LED Light BarDIY Camera Stabilizers and Rigs for Under $25 Here are 5 ways to boost the production value of your video shots on a DIY budget.Cover image via Film Riot.One of the most valuable online resources for filmmakers and video producers is Ryan Connolly’s YouTube channel and production juggernaut, Film Riot. Film Riot provides actionable content on filmmaking questions, techniques, and gear recommendations. One of their recent videos focuses on a few DIY tips they’ve released in the past that will help reduce your budget or give you more time to focus on your production.Let’s take a look at some of these DIY tips as well as where to find the equipment they call for.Low FogIf you’re shooting a horror film, or any type of science fiction story, creating mood and environment is key. This low-lying fog adds a layer of creepiness and a boosts the sense of production value on your set. As Connolly advises, when handling the dry ice, make sure you wear gloves and make sure you don’t touch the ice with your bare skin.What you need:Styrofoam coolerFog machineDry Ice Spray Paint LightsLet’s say you don’t have the resources or time to get a few gels before your next shoot. Not to worry. You can simply spray paint the lightbulb. You can even include these in the shot, as they are visually appealing. Make sure you purchase heat-resistant paint because the bulbs become extremely hot as the shoot goes on (we’ve all seen what they can do to gels).What you need:Heat-resistant paint Lens FlareCapturing an organic lens flare in camera is easier than it sounds, and this cost effective technique will get the job done without taking your shoot outside. With a little bit of tape on the top and bottom of your lens, you can get the flare effect you’ve always wanted, without distracting your audience.If you still want more control over the flare or need to add one during the post-production process, check out RocketStock’s anamorphic lens flare pack here.What you need:TapeFishing line Do you have DIY production tips? Let us know in the comments. Simulating a PartyOne of the most frustrating aspects of shooting a scene that requires a lot of extras is actually rounding up enough people to make the scene look convincing. Fortunately for you, there’s a simple solution to subtly deceive the audience that uses only a handful of people and a few crew members to create the appearance of a raging party. Use your telephoto lens or zoom in enough to close the background up around your subject. Voila. If you want a little added spice, have a crew member walk in front of the camera or behind your subject to add even more to the illusion.What you need:A longer lens Shower CurtainUsing a shower curtain as a diffuser is not just a household trick. Professional cinematographers like Shane Hurlbut have used it on big-budget film sets. Even if you don’t have shower curtain with you on set, a quick visit to nearest online grocery or supply store will set you up with a super cheap solution. This curtain will add a level of diffusion that will help with harsh sunlight or shadows.What you need:Shower curtainlast_img read more

Asian Games 2010: Indian shooters win bronze in men’s douple trap event

first_imgIndian shooters’ gold drought continued and the trio of Ronjan Sodhi, Asher Noria and Vikram Bhatnagar settled for bronze in the men’s double trap event in the Asian Games in Guangzhou on Sunday.Sodhi, Noria and Bhatnagar combined for a score of 403 after shooting 139, 134, 130 respectively.The Chinese team of Qiang Pan, Junjie Mo and Binyuan Hu China clinched the gold with a score of 414 (143+136+135).Kuwait — comprising M Fehaid Aldeehani, M Hamad Alafasi and A Meshfi Almutairi — grabbed the silver with a total of 407 (137+136+134).With today’s bronze, Indian shooters have so far bagged six medals in the event.- With PTI inputslast_img read more