Switzerland dubbed best place for talented workers

first_img– Advertisement – The U.S. came in 15th, ranked behind Germany (11th), Australia (13th), and Hong Kong (14th). It was just ahead of Ireland (18th), Taiwan (20th) and the U.K (23rd).Among the bottom 10 countries were: Russia, Bulgaria, Mexico, Romania, Colombia, Brazil, Venezuela, Slovak Republic, with India and Mongolia coming out last in the ranking.Now in its seventh year, the IMD annual ranking seeks to provide a picture of leading economies’ talent pools, and therefore their global competitiveness. It does so by drawing on a mixture of hard data and surveys to measure markets.- Advertisement – Switzerland was praised for its high-quality education system and focus on apprenticeships, as well as its ability to attract overseas professionals with high living standards and strong pay packets. Denmark, meanwhile, performed well for its emphasis of equal opportunity across society, and Luxembourg ticked up followed sustained investment in its workforce over recent years.Here are the top 10 countries on the list of 63 countries, which was heavily led by Western Europe.1. Switzerland 2. Denmark 3. Luxembourg 4. Iceland 5. Sweden6. Austria 7. Norway 8. Canada 9. Singapore10. the Netherlands- Advertisement – Countries are assessed across three key criteria: ‘Investment and development’ looks at how a country fosters domestic talent; ‘Appeal’ assesses the extent to which an economy retains homegrown talent and draws international talent; and ‘Readiness’ measures the quality of skills and competences available.As with previous years, the latest study was conducted between January and April, and as such, does not fully account for the impact of the pandemic. However, Jose Caballeros, senior economist at the IMD World Competitiveness Center, told CNBC Make It the findings provide some indication of which job markets may feel the greatest social and economic fallout.“The performance of the top talent-competitive countries remains relatively strong,” said Caballeros. “It is among the other economies where we see more fluctuation.”Indonesia, which came in at position 45, and Malaysia, which was 23rd on the list, both fell in the rankings this year. That was due to “brain drain” — the emigration of educated workers away from their home country — and a reduced ability to attract foreign highly skilled workers and international managers, Caballeros said. He added that the pandemic will likely make that problem worse.Meanwhile, other countries that are largely reliant on overseas talent, such as Singapore, Australia, the U.S. and the U.K., could also see a negative impact from recent border restrictions, the report noted.But Caballeros said the pandemic has also provided a spot of opportunity for economies to invest in their people and adapt to new ways of working.“Enabling employees to acquire new or redeploy existing skills — to transition to remote working for example — will also be essential to sustaining the effectiveness of the talent pool in the near future,” he said.“This effectiveness will be necessary to tackle the new challenges that may arise following the current crisis. Facilitating the adoption of flexible new technologies will also be helpful for such economies since they will be able to be redeployed to address the needs of a continuously changing context,” Caballeros added.Don’t miss: Happiness expert: One technique for staying upbeat during the pandemicLike this story? Subscribe to CNBC Make It on YouTube! Switzerland has been named the best place in the world for attracting and nurturing skilled workers, even as the coronavirus pandemic weighs on many countries’ ability to win over top talent.Retaining pole position for the fourth year running, the central European nation beat out other continental neighbors including Denmark, Luxembourg, Iceland and Sweden to secure the top spot in IMD’s World Talent Ranking 2020 released Thursday.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Chivalry is dead and you killed it, ladies.

first_img Sharing is caring! Share 31 Views   no discussions Share Sitting in traffic sucks, but it’s the ultimate observation capsule for people-watching. Might as well scrutinize while you’re stuck between a ditzy chick in a monster SUV and a tourist trying to snap pictures of the White House from the driver’s seat.It’s where I spied a young couple out on a date. He cracked a wry joke, she giggled daintily, and they held hands as they strolled up a block in the heart of downtown D.C. How in-the-honeymoon period adorable are they? I thought. But when Cute Couple paused to enter a restaurant, my foot almost slipped off the brake: he all but broke his neck to get in ahead of her and let the door slam—I mean, physically slonk her—on her shoulder.I sent her a telepathic message to turn tail, hail a cab, and end that date immediately. But she didn’t. She grimaced and limped in after him. And that’s one of the reasons why chivalry is dying a slow, brutal death.I’m not shy about telling y’all that I passionately believe manners are the glue of society, the thin line that keeps us all from going ape you-know-what on each other in social settings and public arenas. Not that that line isn’t fraying. If you’ve stood in line at Walmart for any length of time or taken a ride on public transportation, it’s like being on the frontlines of how dismally bad manners have really gotten.For some reason — I don’t know if it’s global warming or residuals from the Bush administration or the pull of the moon or what it is — but people have absolutely abandoned good, sound, traditional act-rightness. And that lack of decorum has bungled the dating scene. Like it wasn’t already like walking through a dog park with no clean-up laws in the first place.I’m as hip and trendy as the next fun-loving gal, but I’m super old-school when it comes to the application of manners. Feminist agenda be darned: I believe that men should walk on the side closest to the street when we’re out on the town, that they should pull out women’s chairs when we sit down at tables, and — for the love of all that’s even remotely cool — that they shouldn’t let the doggone door crush any part of our persons as they scurry in to slosh back their weight in nachos and beer at a local eatery.I believe being a gentleman is still one of the sexiest qualities a guy can possess and because I don’t see it as often as I’d like, it makes the trait all the more valuable when I do.Watching that girl go into her hell date made me want to scream like a scary movie fan watching a character about to get gutted in a slasher flick. But it’s typical of ladies in this day and age to let that kind of madness slide. I guess the pool of eligible, compatible, marry-able guys has been slimmed so close to depletion that we’ve learned how to settle for not having the little niceties like being respected and even a little revered.I mean, even if we’re not vying for a reception of royal proportions, the least us gals can demand is to be given the greenlight to go through a doorway first. But if we don’t insist on that kind of treatment, it’s not just going to magically manifest. We have to set the expectation early on that that’s how we want to be treated.My boyfriend’s gentlemanliness is one of the things I adore about him and his cute self. In fact, it’s something that all of the few guys I’ve dated had in common (I’m more of a commitment girl, so I’ve only been on a handful of outings that would qualify as a casual date). And if I did so happen to be out with a dude who apparently didn’t know better, I’d stop at the restaurant door and wait. And wait. And wait some more until he got the drift. Same thing at the table pausing for a chair to be pulled out. Same thing at the car door.In a way, it’s like doing my part to remind guys — or teach them if they never knew it in the first place (shame on their mamas, by the way) — that some women expect a higher standard of treatment. It’s not being bourgie or bitchy or snotty or snobby. It’s called being a lady.by The StirYahoo Shinecenter_img Share Tweet LifestyleRelationships Chivalry is dead and you killed it, ladies. by: – April 14, 2011last_img read more

Brayford completes Cardiff move

first_imgCardiff have completed the signing of defender John Brayford from Derby on a four-year contract. The Bluebirds had already agreed a fee for the 25-year-old, believed to be around the £1.5million mark, and the formalities of the deal have been quickly wrapped up. Brayford told Cardiff City Player: “When I heard Cardiff were interested in signing me then I was obviously very interested, especially at the prospect of playing in the Premier League and testing myself at the highest level. Derby will always be a special club to me, but this was an opportunity I couldn’t ignore.” Full-back Brayford will link up with his new team-mates ahead of Saturday’s friendly at Cheltenham. The former Crewe and Burton player made 117 appearances for Derby after making the move to Pride Park in 2010. He made 43 appearances under Nigel Clough in the Championship last term. Brayford becomes Cardiff’s second summer signing, following the club-record acquisition of Danish striker Andreas Cornelius. Cardiff are also leading the race to sign France international midfielder Etienne Capoue. There were reports in the French media earlier this week that the Ligue 1 club had accepted a bid of around £8.6million from the Premier League newboys, but that Capoue is continuing to weight up his options. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more