India win despite Mathews century

first_imgCOLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP):Ravichandran Ashwin took four wickets yesterday to propel India to their first Test series win in Sri Lanka in 22 years, defeating the hosts by 117 runs in the third Test.Chasing 386 to win, Sri Lanka slumped to 107 for five in their second innings, but captain Angelo Mathews scored a fighting 110 and shared 135 runs for the sixth wicket with Kusal Perera (70), giving Sri Lanka a chance to save the Test.However, Perera’s dismissal shortly before tea exposed the tail and the hosts lost their remaining wickets in five overs after the break.Fast bowler Ishant Sharma took the three important wickets of Upul Tharanga (0), Dinesh Chandimal (18) and Mathews in the second innings and collected eight wickets in the match.India hadn’t won a Test series in Sri Lanka since 1993 under captain Mohammad Azharuddin.Sri Lanka won the first Test in Galle by 63 runs and India won the second match by 278 runs.India captain Virat Kohli said that at no stage during the big partnership did he think that the match was slipping away.”In Test cricket on a fifth day even if you get a 100-run partnership you will have that one opportunity to get someone out and you have to make sure you grab that,” Kohli said. “It was a case of concentrating more in that situation.”Mathews said poor batting caused his team’s downfall.”On this wicket we had our chances to win. If not for the collapse in the top order, we could have won the game. Unfortunately we didn’t. We’ll try to rectify those mistakes in the future,” he said.India’s Cheteshwar Pujara, who carried his bat through the first innings for an unbeaten 145 in his comeback Test match, was named Man of the Match.Ashwin, who bagged 21 wickets in the three Tests, was adjudged player of the series.Sri Lanka lost their first three wickets for 21 runs on the fourth evening, leaving Mathews and Kaushal Silva to rebuild the innings.Meanwhile, the International Cricket Council charged India bowler Sharma and Sri Lanka’s Dhammika Prasad, Dinesh Chandimal and Thirimanne with breaching the code of conduct for their angry confrontations on Monday.The players were involved in a series of arguments during India’s second innings after Prasad directed several bouncers at tail-end batsman Sharma.The details of the charges are expected to be announced later today.last_img read more

Not a Dodger panacea

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre Then there was the Brooklyn-born Torre, the new manager, talking about Sandy Koufax, Carl Furillo, Willie Davis, Don Sutton, Don Zimmer and other Dodgers of yesterday. The McCourt mantra is reconnecting with the tradition of the team. Here, finally, they have hired someone who is up to and understands the task. Plus, he’s won four World Series rings. Except. Except? Except Torre is overrated. Overrated? Definitely. As he himself knows better than anyone, he does not walk on water. He’s not going to wave a fungo bat and suddenly the Dodgers will find themselves in the World Series. The young players need to grow. The roster should be tweaked. They had everything, short of drums and trumpets. The press conference to introduce Joe Torre was held in center field of Dodger Stadium. It was an overcast Monday morning. Out of the mist from the Dodgers dugout came Torre, his wife, Ali, Dodgers owners Frank and Jamie McCourt, Vin Scully, the voice of the team, and former manager Tom Lasorda. They were striding with such purpose. It was the perfect photo op. Torre’s thoughts on how baseball should be played are strikingly similar to those of Grady Little, who appears to have been pushed out as manager. Torre and Little are the same person, except Torre got to manage and win with the Yankees. To some, that’s the bad news. Little’s down-home personality made them nervous. The good news is, those rings Torre has give him an edge. Players listen to known winners. Winning prompts self-confidence. Torre replacing Little is Phil Jackson replacing Del Harris, a solid coach who did not get it done with the Lakers. Torre was the right man at the right time when he arrived at Yankee Stadium. It may be a repeat performance with the Dodgers. Understand, the overrated observation is based on his $4.5 million annual salary and the view he has special knowledge or magic. This bothers him. Not the salary. No complaints there. Just what people perceive him to be, which, he volunteered makes him very uncomfortable. The little self portrait is an indication his feet remain on the ground. This is a solid, old-school baseball man who is a solid person. Players like to play for Torre because he’s steady, because he recognizes the long, hot baseball summer is a marathon. No doubt he cringes when it is said he brings credibility to the Dodgers. As if this franchise needs to hire a high-profile manager to gain credibility. Or buzz. Or glitz. A guy from Brooklyn knows that’s a myth and that the real fans, just like the fans where he grew up, are about winning. Celebrity comes with success here, as Pete Carroll, Jim Harrick, John Wooden, John McKay and Dodgers managers named Walt Alston and Lasorda have demonstrated over the years. Torre gets it. He became a media darling in New York because he managed the Yankees when they took off on a special run and because New York loves to love its heroes. Some say he is calculating. This side was not seen during more than three hours of general press conference, stand-up one-on-ones with radio and TV talkers and a sit-down with a dozen or so reporters who regularly cover the team, plus a couple of visitors from New York. If it is there, it means he is savvy and seeks to be in control. A knock in years gone by was he got in his golf, arrived late at the park and departed in a hurry following games. A more experienced Torre talks about the work it takes to get the job done. In the past, managers hired their buddies to be their coaches. Torre wants qualified coaches he hopes will become his friends. A case in point is Don Mattingly, hired as a Yankees coach by owner George Steinbrenner. Torre came to value Mattingly so much, he asked him to come with him to the Dodgers. Torre’s understanding of the dynamics of his staff, of the clubhouse and of how teams work is seen in him bringing Larry Bowa from New York to be his third base coach. Torre is quiet in the Alston mode. Bowa is an in-your-face type who will not be shy with, say, outfielders who repeatedly miss the cutoff man or do not hustle on the bases. This is more important to the real fans than a photo op. Another positive sign came when Torre was asked who influenced his approach as a manager. He talked about Red Schoendienst. If you do not know the name, Schoendienst was a player’s player who became a player’s manager. You will not find a better role model. For those looking for cosmic signs, the sun came out on this overcast morning when it was Torre’s time to speak. mwsptcol@aol.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Wednesday’s QPR quiz

first_imgTest your Rangers knowledge. See how many of these five questions you can answer correctly…[wp-simple-survey-7]Click here for yesterday’s QPR quizClick here for Monday’s QPR quizFollow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

Human Adaptation Can Be Rapid

first_imgHow long does it take for humans to adapt to environmental changes?  Some recent papers investigated this question.Paleface:  If it is assumed that humans started out medium or dark-skinned, how long did it take for Europeans to lose much of that original pigment?  An article in Science April 20 says maybe just 6,000 to 12,000 years.  “This contradicts a long-standing hypothesis that modern humans in Europe grew paler about 40,000 years ago, as soon as they migrated into northern latitudes,” the article states, reporting on a March meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.  Pale skin is said to have an adaptive value at high latitudes: “Under darker skies, pale skin absorbs more sunlight than dark skin, allowing ultraviolet rays to produce more vitamin D for bone growth and calcium absorption.”  The new date was based on genetic studies that suggested a “selective sweep occurred 5300 to 6000 years ago” or up to 12,000 years ago, “given the imprecision of method”.High life:  Ann Gibbons in Science reported on another discussion item from the American Association of Physical Anthropologists: how Tibetan children can tolerate the high altitude.  “Researchers seldom see Darwinian natural selection happening in living people,” she began.  “So physical anthropologist Cynthia Beall was delighted in 2004 when she discovered a trait that boosts the survival of some Tibetan children, apparently by raising the level of oxygen in their mothers’ tissues–a crucial advantage during pregnancy 4 kilometers above sea level.”  Updated research has revealed a genetic change that allows women to boost their blood volume and deliver more oxygen to the tissues.  Beall measured the selective pressure at 1:0.44, stronger than the fitness ratio measured for the sickle-cell gene.  They said, “the adaptation represents some of the strongest natural selection yet measured in humans.”    Surprisingly, this appears to be a different adaptation mechanism than that found in populations living in the Andes.  There, mothers are able to boost the amount of hemoglobin.  These correlations are uncertain, however; “it’s quite possible that the Tibetans have evolved more than one way to boost blood oxygen,” Beall cautioned.  Mark Gladwin threw in a Darwinian proverb: “Study the pregnant women, because that’s where you’ll see evolution in action.”Got milk?  Another strong selection effect in humans is for lactose tolerance.  Current Biology (April 17) had an article on this phenomenon, which “might have meant the difference between life and death” to early dairy farmers, Greg Gibson (North Carolina State U) said.  The admittedly imperfect ability to tolerate lactose represents another selective sweep some 5,000 to 10,000 years ago, about the time humans began to domesticate cattle.  He remarked, “It is hard to refute that this is a lovely example of the coevolution of genes and culture.”    Nevertheless, Gibson spent most of the article debunking the “thrifty genes” hypothesis of evolutionary selection.  This is a 45-year-old idea that the “high incidence of diabetes in modern humans is a result of positive selection for alleles that confer the ability to rapidly sequester rare caches of carbohydrates as fat that would tide us over during famine.”  This adaptation now works against us in our urbanized society, it is claimed: it tends us toward obesity.  So why does Gibson think this is a poor hypothesis?  “Unfortunately, these three preconditions for natural selection are all too often mistaken by adaptationists as both necessary and sufficient for evolution to occur,” he cautioned.  But we need to be more quantitative if sufficiency is to be proven.”  At the end, he was even more emphatic: “Those inclined toward Darwinian medicine like to explain disease as the price we pay for the beneficial effects of alleles that have accompanied human adaptation.  These cases of not-so-thrifty genes suggest though that we should not be so quick to jump on the bandwagon: the coevolution of genes and culture is tremendously more complex.”Funny he should mention Darwinian medicine.  A paper on that very subject appeared in Public Library of Science: Biology this month.  Catriona J. MacCallum tried again to make the case that medical doctors need to study evolution to understand disease (cf. 01/13/2003.  Distressed that medical schools are not considering evolution essential to the curriculum (see 06/25/2003), MacCallum wrote,It is curious that Charles Darwin, perhaps medicine’s most famous dropout, provided the impetus for a subject that figures so rarely in medical education.  Indeed, even the iconic textbook example of evolution—antibiotic resistance—is rarely described as “evolution” in relevant papers published in medical journals.  Despite potentially valid reasons for this oversight (e.g., that authors of papers in medical journals would regard the term as too general), it propagates into the popular press when those papers are reported on, feeding the wider perception of evolution’s irrelevance in general, and to medicine in particular.  Yet an understanding of how natural selection shapes vulnerability to disease can provide fundamental insights into medicine and health and is no less relevant than an understanding of physiology or biochemistry.MacCallum agreed that the “thrifty gene” concept has fallen into disfavor.  Some other evolutionary ideas are also simplistic: “The relationship between changing environment, diet, and susceptibility to disease, however, is also far from clear.”  Attempts to recreate a Stone-Age Diet “can be misleading,” she said.  Still, she promoted the idea that evolutionary concepts can help medical practice.  Granted, a mechanic may not need to understand the history of technology to fix a car, but an understanding of the evolutionary principles can help prepare for outbreaks of infectious disease, like bird flu, she argued.    Why the resistance to evolutionary teaching in medical schools?  In some cases, it’s the students who rebel:Although Paul O’Higgins thought a comparison of the brachial plexus to the pentadactyl limb was helpful, not all his students agreed—complaints were lodged that he was forcing evolution on them.  That lack of support was also reflected in the participation of only three medical students at the York meeting (albeit enthusiastic ones), despite being widely publicized.  It is not clear whether this is because medical students are more overburdened than most or because of a more deep-rooted resistance to the subject, reflecting wider political and religious prejudice against evolution.So what’s the solution?  “But evolutionary medicine isn’t and shouldn’t be controversial, and the best way to challenge prejudice is through education.”  She took refuge in the famous Dobzhansky quote, “Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution.”  As an experiment, let’s consider the three cases listed above.  It isn’t very controversial that survivors of lactose, decreased sunlight and oxygen will predominate in those environments, but aren’t they all still human?  Is this really the kind of evolution that Darwin meant?    MacCallum was undaunted by such questions.  “The time has clearly come for medicine to explicitly integrate evolutionary biology into its theoretical and practical underpinnings,” she ended with rhetorical flair.  “The medical students of Charles Darwin’s day did not have the advantage of such a powerful framework to inform their thinking; we shouldn’t deprive today’s budding medical talent of the potential insights to be gained at the intersection of these two great disciplines.”  Convincing the medical students of this may be the hard part.You do NOT want an evolutionary biologist in the room when you need TLC at the hospital.  Lying in bed with pain and weakness, you are not going to look like a fit individual who deserves to survive.    MacCallum again exhibited the shallowness and uselessness of evolutionary thinking.  Notice also the elitist snobbery: anyone who doesn’t agree with the Darwin Party Framework is prejudiced by definition, and must be sent to the re-education camp (cf. 12/21/2005).    Despite the pleas to pul-lease teach Darwin in medical school, medicine is doing fine without the help of Dropout Darwin.  Medicine has a multi-thousand year history that was advanced largely by Christians.  The examples she cited, including the “iconic textbook example” of evolution – antibiotic resistance (dealt a blow by Jonathan Wells in his book Icons of Evolution; see also the Darwinist confession from 09/12/2004) – are all just microevolutionary changes.  The three examples reported above are all microevolutionary changes.  Natural selection at the micro level is not the issue.  Even young-earth creationists accept that.    Such evidence has nothing to do with Darwin’s colossal simplistic generality, the Mystical Tree of Life (02/01/2007).  It has nothing to do with proving that humans have bacteria ancestors, and most medical students and professors know it.  You can almost hear the snickers of students in the classroom when the Prof tells his little fable about how the brachial plexus resembles the pentadactyl limb.  “Right, Teach.  Will that be on the test?  Can I take a pill and call you in the morning?”  Maybe the only way to get a higher turnout than three students at the next well-publicized “Medicine and Evolution” meeting is to award extra credit, provided the students are allowed to bring cots and pillows.    Despite the Dobzhansky rallying cry, things make perfect sense without evolution.  In none of the three cases listed above is Darwin vindicated or needed.  All the humans in those societies are still one species with the rest of humanity, capable of intermarrying and raising children.  What’s more, the adaptive changes observed did not take hundreds of thousands of years.  To the consternation of earlier Darwinists whose ideas are now discredited, the changes fit easily within a Biblical framework of human history.  What is Darwin’s score?  Even MacCallum admits that previous evolutionary ideas like “thrifty genes” have been discarded.  Is anything left that is not controversial and subject to overthrow?  We don’t need Darwin.  We don’t want Darwin.  We want to make sense in the light of the evidence, and help the weak in the process.(Visited 15 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Time for Mars Life Again

first_imgMethane detection around Mars is giving new life to claims there is life on Mars.  Space.com #1 and Space.com #2 explain why NASA scientists are looking to see if the methane can be explained geologically or biologically.  Some news sites, like The Sun, go over the top with claims life has been discovered.  Only the readers who look at the ending lines will realize there is skepticism about the claims.  The BBC News presented both biology and geology as possibilities.  See earlier reports on Mars methane from 03/30/2004, 11/14/2004 and 12/14/2004.This can only mean one thing: it’s funding season again.  NASA helped distract attention from Clinton’s sins in 1996 with the whiz-bang press conference about life in the Martian meteorite.  That provided enough funds to launch the science of Astrobiology (04/17/2006, 08/06/2006).  They probably need a boost from Obama.  The safe money is on the geology (see sample rebuttal on Reasons.org).  Earth’s methane is biogenic, but Titan’s is geological.  The question no one is asking is whether a geological origin suggests Mars is not as old as claimed (09/28/2004).  You can ask it, though.  Meanwhile, enjoy Wayne Stayskal’s cartoon.(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Molecular Motors Put a Spring in Your Step

first_imgWhen you feel in spring in your step, thank tiny molecular motors in your muscles and tissues that make it possible.A paper in Science by researchers primarily from University of Washington, Seattle, proposed the novel idea that the molecular motors in muscle cells store elastic energy.  Observing flight muscles in moths, they deduced that the springiness of these motors provides an additional boost to the power generate by muscles:Muscles not only generate force. They may act as springs, providing energy storage to drive locomotion. Although extensible myofilaments are implicated as sites of energy storage, we show that intramuscular temperature gradients may enable molecular motors (cross-bridges) to store elastic strain energy…. These results suggest that cross-bridges can perform functions other than contraction, acting as molecular links for elastic energy storage.Researchers from Europe, publishing in PNAS, found that collagen and fibrin exhibit non-linear strain response upon loading.  This is another factor that provides resilience in movement.We show that the nonlinear mechanical response of networks formed from un–cross-linked fibrin or collagen type I continually changes in response to repeated large-strain loading. We demonstrate that this dynamic evolution of the mechanical response arises from a shift of a characteristic nonlinear stress–strain relationship to higher strains. Therefore, the imposed loading does not weaken the underlying matrices but instead delays the occurrence of the strain stiffening. Using confocal microscopy, we present direct evidence that this behavior results from persistent lengthening of individual fibers caused by an interplay between fiber stretching and fiber buckling when the networks are repeatedly strained…. Thus, a fibrous architecture in combination with constituents that exhibit internal plasticity creates a material whose mechanical response adapts to external loading conditions.This behavior is so interesting, they pass the news on to biomimetics engineers: “This design principle may be useful to engineer novel materials with this capability.”Once again, the CEH Law is confirmed: Darwin-talk is inversely proportional to the amount of detail discussed about biological systems. (Visited 33 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Press release: Memories of the Struggle: Australians Against Apartheid an exhibition by ASAA

first_imgA multimedia exhibition that launches this week is to showcase a photographic timeline of events that weaves together a narrative of Australia’s involvement in the fight against apartheid.Premier of Gauteng Province, Mr David Makhura, is one of the people to officially open the multimedia exhibition. (Image: GCIS)Johannesburg, Monday 30 October 2017 – The Australasian South African Alliance (ASAA), in partnership with the Australian High Commission in South Africa, Brand South Africa and Constitution Hill, will launch an exhibition titled – Memories of the Struggle: Australians Against Apartheid, in Johannesburg on Thursday, 02 November 2017 at Constitution Hill at 18h30.This multimedia exhibition, to be officially opened by the Premier of Gauteng Province, Mr David Makhura and the Australian High Commissioner to South Africa, His Excellency, Mr Adam McCarthy, is a photographic timeline of events that weaves together a narrative of Australia’s involvement in the fight against apartheid.It will share insights into the Australian contribution to the collapse of apartheid, such as the ‘Stop the Tours’ movement which served to sever cricket and rugby relations with Apartheid South Africa. Such activism did not occur without political controversy or conflicts as related throughout the various sections of the exhibition.Several former activists such as• Anthony Abrahams, one of the Wallabies who campaigned against the 1971 rugby tour• Meredith Burgmann and Verity Burgmann who famously stopped the game in Sydney (where Meredith was given a two-month jail sentence)• Ken Davis and Frances Letters, who were both arrested during sporting tour protests• Jane Singleton, former Chair of the Australian National ANC Support Committee will be present at the launch and will be joined by a number of South African expats – Natalie Hendricks, Sybil Wakefield, Ish Larney, Pat Wagner – active then under the umbrella of the AAAM as well as currently under that of ASAA. Fellow compatriot, Angus Leendertz, an UCT alumnus, now resident in Sydney, is the curator of this innovative ‘step back into history and personal memories’.“Brand South Africa is honoured to be partnering with the ASAA in the execution of the exhibition, especially at such a historical place such as Constitution Hill, which symbolises South Africa’s journey to democracy”, said Brand South Africa’s CEO Dr Kingsley Makhubela.“We are indeed proud to be welcoming the exhibition within the Constitution Hill precinct which indeed serves as an effective custodian and proponent of Constitutionalism, Human Rights and Democracy in South Africa. It is a living museum where the past, present and future collide in a unique paradox that celebrates the victory of our present day democracy. A visit here leaves you forever changed with the unrelenting resolve ‘never again must one human being treat another human being in this manner, said ConHill CEO Ms Dawn Robertson.The exhibition, though focused on Australia, surfaces a largely unknown ‘history’ and narrative among the local general public of the significant roles played by social justice activists around the globe in support of the anti-apartheid struggle whether through blockades of armaments factories by workers in the UK; the vigorous divestment campaigns on campuses throughout the USA; the ‘End Bank Loans’ and ‘Boycott Outspan Oranges’ campaigns across most of Western Europe, the UK and Japan!“This celebration of activism fits so well with the current (social justice) campaigns that prove you CAN make a difference. Principled and gutsy Australians helped make a difference to the lives of hundreds of thousands of South Africans”, said former Chair of the Australian National ANC Support Committee, Ms Jane Singleton.“I hope that visitors to the exhibition leave with the knowledge that Australia was, and remains today, a friend and supporter of a free and democratic South Africa”, said Australian High Commissioner, His Excellency Mr Adam McCarthy.Media is invited as follows:High-res pictures are available on request.Date: Thursday, 02 November 2017Time: 17:00 for pre-interviews18:30 Official OpeningVenue: The Constitution Hill,11 Kotze Road, JohannesburgRSVP and for more information or to set up interviews, please see contacts below:RSVPS/Enquiries: Ntombi NtanziTel: +27 11 712 5061Mobile: +27 (0) 81 704 1488Email: ntombin@brandsouthafrica.comNotes to the EditorAbout the ExhibitionMemories of the Struggle – Australians Against ApartheidAbout Brand South AfricaBrand South Africa is the official marketing agency of South Africa, with a mandate to build the country’s brand reputation, in order to improve its global competitiveness. Its aim is also to build pride and patriotism among South Africans, in order to contribute to social cohesion and nation brand ambassadorship.Join the conversation at:Follow Brand South AfricaOn Twitter: @Brand_SAOn the Official Brand South Africa Facebook account.Tell us how you Play Your Part:On Twitter: @PlayYourPartSA or via the website.last_img read more

Keep scouting for potato leafhoppers in alfalfa

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Rory Lewandowski, CCA, Mark Sulc, Kelley Tilmon, Ohio State University ExtensionIf you grow alfalfa, now is the time to scout those fields for potato leafhoppers. Integrated pest management (IPM) scouts are finding potato leafhoppers (PLH) widely distributed across a number of alfalfa fields. PLH numbers have ranged from low to well above economic treatment thresholds. In addition, alfalfa growers have been calling about yellow leaves on alfalfa, one of the classic PLH damage symptoms. Alfalfa growers should consider regular field scouting for PLH because this is one of the economically significant pests of alfalfa.The potato leafhopper is a small bright green wedge shaped insect that arrives in our area each year on storm fronts from the Gulf Coast region. PLH is a sucking insect. PLH feeding causes stunting of alfalfa plants resulting in yield loss. Excessive stress on plants by heavy PLH feeding can result in yield reductions in the current as well as subsequent cuttings. A common symptom of PLH feeding is a wedge-shaped yellowing of leaf tips. If you are noticing these symptoms, some damage has been done. Regular scouting can help to detect PLH earlier and determine if there is a need for a rescue treatment.Scouting involves the use of a sweep net. There is no other way to properly and accurately scout for PLH. The procedure is to take three to five samples for each 25 acres from random areas within the field. One sample consists of 10 pendulum sweeps. After the 10-sweep sample, carefully inspect the net contents and count the number of PLH adults and nymphs. For non-PLH resistant alfalfa varieties, treatment is warranted if the number of PLH adults and nymphs is equal to or greater than the average height of the alfalfa in inches.An OSU Extension fact sheet on PLH is available on-line at https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/ENT-33. A short video clip on how to scout for PLH and use a sweep net to sample for PLH is available at http://tiny.cc/PLHscouting featuring Mark Sulc, OSU Extension Forage Specialist.last_img read more

The 2018 Ohio Crop Tour – I-71 Leg – Day 2

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Clinton CountyCorn: This April 27th corn was all around good. Color was nice, ear fill was solid and very little disease and insect pressure to speak of. The ears were a good size but only 14 around. Even with that into consideration, our yield check is at 175.Soybeans: These non-GMO beans were planted on May 18th. They were very clean with only minor insect feeding here. Canopy height was 28 inches and distance between nodes was 2 inches. We rate this field as Poor to Fair.Overall County Observations – Just as consistent as we have seen the last 3 stops. Stress is hard to come by here and they got a good bit of rain today that will help been finish off.Click on the pictures for a closer lookClinton CountyClinton CountyClinton CountyClinton CountyClinton CountyClinton CountyHighland CountyCorn: This farmer told us that a big July storm knocked some of this corn down and we noticed that as we headed in for a sample. Bird damage has been an issue here for a few years now. Development still has a way to go here but the crop looks strong. Our yield guess is 190.Soybeans: When we first took a broad look at this field we knew something wasn’t right. Some yellowing was taking place in numerous parts of these beans. The farmer told us he has been doing some sampling and the plant is having trouble taking up potash. Something he will work on next year. Canopy height was 36 inches and there were 2 inches between nodes. Noticed green stink bugs and Japanese Beetles. We rate this field as Good.Overall County Observations – More good looking crops here. Even beans all over. Some fields, even though we are in Southern Ohio, we planted a little later than some of our previous fields north of here.Click on the photos for a better viewHighland CountyHighland CountyHighland CountyHighland CountyHighland CountyHighland CountyHighland CountyHighland CountyFayette CountyCorn: These ears looked bigger than any we have seen, but many of them were only 14 around, hurting our final yield count. These have fired up to the ear leaf. Some Grey and Northern, but not above the ear. We passed a few wet spots are we walked to our scout spot. Pretty healthy looking otherwise and this area is getting some rain that the soil looks like it needed. Our yield estimate is 155.Soybeans: Some SDS taking hold in this field and we also came across some Cercospora Leaf Blight here. Canopy height was 36 inches and distance between nodes was 2 inches. Low pressure from disease and insects and we rate this field as Good.Overall County Observations – They are getting a lot of rain here today and by the looks of things, there was water here early too. Fairly uniform through this area for both corn and beans.Click on the pictures for a closer lookFayette CountyFayette CountyFayette CountyFayette CountyFayette CountyFayette CountyFayette CountyFayette CountyRoss CountyCorn: This field was planted on May 12th and this is a low laying area. Because of that, some of this plot that was planted never came up. The majority of this field is a full dent and starting to mature. This population was higher and moisture was still just fine. Ear fill was great and the ears were heavy. Low insect and disease pressure here. Our yield guess is 201.Soybeans: These beans are a high-oleic and was planted on May 3rd. Canopy height was 48 inches with 2.5 inches between nodes. It was tough getting through the field due to some lodging issues. Once we found our spot, we saw heavy Frogeye and some SDS showing up. These beans were well podded but the insect and disease pressures may present some challenges to this crop. There was even some pod feeding here which we haven’t seen until now. We rate this field as Fair.Overall County Observation – Things continue to look good here overall. Moisture has been adequate here compared to the early part of Day 2. That moisture, along with humidity, has disease hitting the soybeans more than we’ve noticed in other counties.For a better view, click on the picturesRoss CountyRoss CountyRoss CountyRoss CountyRoss CountyRoss CountyRoss CountyRoss CountyFairfield CountyCorn: This was the most disease pressure we have seen in corn so far this week, at least above the ear (which all of the leaves pictures were). GLS, Northern and Holcus Leaf Spot. This was one of the highest populations we have seen at 34,000 in one of the spots we were in and kernels were deep. Even with the issues listed about, this is the highest yielding field, by our estimate, so far on tour at 222.Soybeans: Found some issues with this field, including Downey Mildew, Frogeye and insects. Got one shot of Japanese Beetles and a Stinkbug in the pictures. The canopy for 40 inches and distance between nodes was 2 inches. Pod set was average, roots were strong and overall a nice field of beans. We rate it as Good.Overall County Observations – Summer has been very easy on this part of the state. Crops look healthy and firing is at a minimum. Farmers in this county should be excited about what’s to come.Click on the photos for a closer lookFairfield CountyFairfield CountyFairfield CountyFairfield CountyFairfield CountyFairfield CountyFairfield CountyFairfield CountyPickaway CountyCorn: The corn was planted on May 1st and is finishing dent stage. Stand was above average and ears were just about as perfect as we have seen this week. Our yield calc here is 192.Soybeans: This May 16th planted field looked like carpet. These 3.2 beans had a canopy height of 36 inches and there were 2 to 3 inches between nodes. Saw a little Frogeye and minimal insect feeding. We rate this field as Good.Overall County Observations – This county also got a lot of rain early on, but Mother Nature shaped up for a good part of the growing season. Corn looks healthy and even and is a great shade of green.Click on the pictures for a closer lookPickaway CountyPickaway CountyPickaway CountyPickaway CountyPickaway CountyPickaway CountyPickaway CountyPickaway CountyMadison CountyCorn: This was a Farm Science Review 99-day corn already drying down and it was a nice stand. They have had a dry spell here over the growing season and the rains they are getting now are coming a little too late. We noticed some tip-back with some starting to abort kernels. Some GLS but mostly below the ear. Our yield guess here is 171.Soybeans: A low population here, but an excellent stand. We are getting a good amount of rain here now and that will be a great way to finish these beans off. Canopy height was 35 inches and distance between nodes was 2 inches. Very low disease and insect pressure and this field is rated Good to Excellent by our crew.Overall County Observations – Things here look much more uniform that what we have seen so far today. Many fields here were planted earlier in the season.Madison CountyMadison CountyMadison CountyMadison CountyMadison CountyMadison CountyMadison CountyMadison CountyClark CountyCorn: As you can see by the picture, most of the disease pressure here was below the ear. This was a pretty good field of corn with light insect pressure and excellent ear fill. There was some weeds that got away from this farmer by it won’t too bad at this point. Our yield calc is 175.Soybeans: This was our first spotting of white mold in soybeans along with some SDS setting in, but they have podded nicely and they were tall. Canopy height was 46 inches and nodes were 2 1/2 inches apart. We rate this field as Good to Excellent.Overall County Observations – This area surely had a lot of early potential and that potential hung on with some nicer weather than just east of here to help this crop along.For a better view, click the photosClark CountyClark CountyClark CountyClark CountyClark CountyClark CountyClark CountyClark CountyChampaign CountyCorn: We found twin-row corn here and found out it was planted on April 30th. They got more rain here then they wanted and it hurt early on. Firing was happening about and below the ear in one of the spots we sampled. Our yield guess here is 155.Soybeans: These beans thin out quite a bit in some areas and we found grasshoppers, stink bugs and Japanese Beetles. Canopy height was 32 inches high and nodes were 2.5 inches apart. 15 inch rows here and we rate this field as Poor to Fair.Overall County Observations – Things have changed dramatically here compared to what we saw yesterday. Some of the best dirt has some of the worst looking crops and heavy rains and then no moisture at all are to blame. We are seeing many different shades of green this morning.For a closer look, click the picturesChampaign CountyChampaign CountyChampaign CountyChampaign CountyChampaign CountyChampaign CountyChampaign CountyChampaign CountyUnion CountyCorn: This field is very fall along in full dent. Planted on May 7th, this was a good stand, but some firing has begun here. Shouldn’t make a difference this time of year for this field. Population at one of our check points was a little low due to some gaps. Ear fill was excellent. Our yield number here is 187.Soybeans: This was the field variable bean field we have seen on tour so far. Also the heaviest Frogeye we have come across. Canopy height was 36 inches with 2 inches in between nodes. Planting date was May 14th. Our rating for this field is Good.Overall County Observations – This area received some much needed rain this morning, but it is easy to see they had plenty of moisture early with some water spots. Variability was noticeable throughout the county.Click on the pictures for a better lookUnion CountyUnion CountyUnion CountyUnion CountyUnion CountyUnion CountyUnion CountyUnion Countylast_img read more

5 DIY Tips for Your Next Shoot

first_imgHere are a few other DIY posts from PremiumBeat worth checking out:10 Cheap Tripod Dolly Options to Try at HomeMake Your Own DIY LED Light BarDIY Camera Stabilizers and Rigs for Under $25 Here are 5 ways to boost the production value of your video shots on a DIY budget.Cover image via Film Riot.One of the most valuable online resources for filmmakers and video producers is Ryan Connolly’s YouTube channel and production juggernaut, Film Riot. Film Riot provides actionable content on filmmaking questions, techniques, and gear recommendations. One of their recent videos focuses on a few DIY tips they’ve released in the past that will help reduce your budget or give you more time to focus on your production.Let’s take a look at some of these DIY tips as well as where to find the equipment they call for.Low FogIf you’re shooting a horror film, or any type of science fiction story, creating mood and environment is key. This low-lying fog adds a layer of creepiness and a boosts the sense of production value on your set. As Connolly advises, when handling the dry ice, make sure you wear gloves and make sure you don’t touch the ice with your bare skin.What you need:Styrofoam coolerFog machineDry Ice Spray Paint LightsLet’s say you don’t have the resources or time to get a few gels before your next shoot. Not to worry. You can simply spray paint the lightbulb. You can even include these in the shot, as they are visually appealing. Make sure you purchase heat-resistant paint because the bulbs become extremely hot as the shoot goes on (we’ve all seen what they can do to gels).What you need:Heat-resistant paint Lens FlareCapturing an organic lens flare in camera is easier than it sounds, and this cost effective technique will get the job done without taking your shoot outside. With a little bit of tape on the top and bottom of your lens, you can get the flare effect you’ve always wanted, without distracting your audience.If you still want more control over the flare or need to add one during the post-production process, check out RocketStock’s anamorphic lens flare pack here.What you need:TapeFishing line Do you have DIY production tips? Let us know in the comments. Simulating a PartyOne of the most frustrating aspects of shooting a scene that requires a lot of extras is actually rounding up enough people to make the scene look convincing. Fortunately for you, there’s a simple solution to subtly deceive the audience that uses only a handful of people and a few crew members to create the appearance of a raging party. Use your telephoto lens or zoom in enough to close the background up around your subject. Voila. If you want a little added spice, have a crew member walk in front of the camera or behind your subject to add even more to the illusion.What you need:A longer lens Shower CurtainUsing a shower curtain as a diffuser is not just a household trick. Professional cinematographers like Shane Hurlbut have used it on big-budget film sets. Even if you don’t have shower curtain with you on set, a quick visit to nearest online grocery or supply store will set you up with a super cheap solution. This curtain will add a level of diffusion that will help with harsh sunlight or shadows.What you need:Shower curtainlast_img read more