GREYHOUND RACING: LIFFORD RESULTS

first_imgBudders Reward took the honours in the final of The Finn 575, the feature race at last night’s greyhound racing at Lifford.The 7/4 joint favourite, owned and trained by Seamus Teague, romped to victory in a time of  31.78 to finish seven lengths ahead of second-placed Rocky High, owned and trained by Noel Lynch. Results were:Race 1 The Quick Fire 350 first semi-final (350 yards): 1, Loyal Lamp; 2, Ballougry Bound. Time: 19.61. Distance: a length.Race 2 The Quick Fire 350 second semi-final (350 yards): 1, Tober Scolari 4/5 fav; 2, Coolcholly Kate 5/1. Time: 19.22. Distance: 3 lengths.Race 3 (350 yards): 1, GoodintheHoo 5/2; 2, Macsruso 3/1. Favourite: Corner Plane 2/1. Time: 19.20. Distance: 2.5 lengths. Race 4 (525 yards): 1, Some Effort 4/1; 2, Amarillos Girl 6/1. Joint favourites: Colarhouse Bound and Friend of Jack, 5/4. Time: 29.59. Distance: half a length.Race 5 (525 yards): 1, Wrong Note 5/2 jt fav; 2, Holborn Oscar 4/1. Jt. Favourite: Heather If. Time: 29.21. Distance: 3.75 lengths.Race 6 (350 yards): 1, Drumsna Major 61; 2, Kilnacloy Prince 9/4. Favourite: Free Falling 5/4. Time: 19.95. Distance: 2 lengths.Race 7 (525 yards): 1, Ulster Idea; 2, Fridays Maye. Time 28.61. Distance: 6.75 lengths.Race 8 (525 yards): 1, Altmore Champ 3/1; Tahina Sabrina 2/1. Favourite:  Do It Kim 6/4. Time: 28.91. Distance: 2.75 lengths.Race 9 The Quick Draw semi-final one (350 yards); 1, Saberry 5/2; 2, Drumsna Lilly 4/1. Favourite: Fridays Berlin 6/4. Time: 19.15. Distance: 2.25 lengths. Race 10 (350 yards): 1, Saberry 5/2; 2, Drumsna Lilly 4/1. Favourite: Fridays Berlin 6/4. Time: 19.15. Distance: 2.25 lengths.Race 11 The Finn 575 Final (575 yards): 1, Budders Reward 7/4 jt fav; 2, Rocky High 6/1. Joint favourite: Culture Annie. Time: 31.78. Distance: 7 lengths.Race 12 (525 yards): 1, Budders Luck 7/4 fav; 2, Drumsna Canyon 3/1. Time: 28.86. Distance: 6 lengths. GREYHOUND RACING: LIFFORD RESULTS was last modified: June 22nd, 2014 by johngerardShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:575finngreyhoundLiffordRacingResultslast_img read more

Takeaways: Will Sharks’ coach show patience with the Vlasic-Karlsson pairing?

first_imgSAN JOSE — Before we dive into the Erik Karlsson stuff, let’s give some props to Joe Pavelski.Captain Clutch came through in crunch time again Saturday, jumping on Timo Meier’s rebound in the slot and burying it at 13:06 of the third to clinch two points for the Sharks on a night when the Vancouver Canucks controlled much of the play.The goal came after Pavelski pressured Alex Biega into turning the puck over in his own zone, setting the stage for his heroics later in the shift. Pavelski also …last_img read more

SA’s stock exchange lists

first_img6 June 2006South Africa’s only stock exchange, the JSE Ltd, listed on its own exchange on Monday morning.In a momentous occasion in the history of the exchange, guests were joined by Deputy President Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, and wore a variety of hats in memory of the closing day of the old trading floor nearly 10 years ago to the day.By 10.30am the JSE had traded in the same region of trades seen in heavyweight companies BHP Billiton and First Rand.The JSE now joins an elite number of international bourses – including the London and New York stock exchanges, Deutsche Borse, Nasdaq, Euronext, the Australian Stock Exchange, the Singapore Exchange and the Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing – that have listed on their own markets.For investors in South Africa and abroad, the move brings heightened transparency and visibility to the trading of JSE shares, which in turn has the potential to improve their liquidity and tradeability.The appearance of the JSE Ltd on the main board will allow international and local investors – including institutional and retail investors – the opportunity to compare the JSE as a listed company against its other listed peers.For brokers, many of whom have been members of the JSE for decades, the listing brings yet another counter onto their books to trade.“For the JSE, the listing brings with it an opportunity to both showcase itself to investors as a well-governed company as well as the opportunity to broaden our shareholder base through a broad-based black economic empowerment initiative that was integral to the listing,” said Russell Loubser, CEO of the newly listed exchange.The broad-based BEE initiative consists of two parts: a Black Shareholder Retention Scheme aimed at retaining existing black shareholders, and a JSE Empowerment Fund aimed at funding education for black people wanting to work in the financial services industry.The initiatives will raise the JSE’s direct black shareholding to over 10%.“This listing firmly entrenches the JSE’s commitment to transformation and allows us to lead by example in every aspect of corporate life, including black economic empowerment, as a critical consideration in the social landscape of South Africa today,” said JSE chairman Humphrey Borkum.“It has taken 10 years of hard work to get the JSE to a stage where it can proudly stand up and be counted amongst its peers as a listed company,” said Loubser. “But if you had to ask any of my team, they’d tell you without hesitation that it’s been worth the wait.”As a listed company, the JSE counter appears in the general financial-investment services sector under the alpha code JSE.SouthAfrica.info reporter Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Ford secures Africa export contract

first_img8 May 2008Pretoria-based Ford Motor Company of Southern Africa (FMCSA) has secured an export contract to supply right- and left-hand-drive models of the popular Ford Ranger pickup truck to African markets.In a statement this week FMCSA said that it began exporting the right-hand-drive variants from April and will follow with exports of left-hand-drive vehicles from July onwards.The company expects to manufacture approximately 10 000 Rangers for export at its plant in Silverton, outside Pretoria, during the remainder of the year.This number will increase to 24 000 Rangers for export in 2009, and to approximately 40 000 Rangers by 2010, raising the company’s total export volume to 60 000 vehicles per year.“This is another important contract for Ford of Southern Africa, and clearly shows the confidence Ford Motor Company has in our world-class workforce and their ability to produce vehicles of international standards and quality,” said FMCSA chief executive Hal Feder.“It also further highlights our ongoing commitment to expanding our operations and export component in South Africa.”The contract would assist the company in preparing for the export programme of Ford’s next generation global compact pickup in 2011, by enhancing the plant’s manufacturing capabilities.FMCSA recently announced it would invest more than R 1.5-billion to expand operations for the production of the next-generation pickup truck and Puma diesel engine.Apart from the Silverton plant that assembles Ford, Mazda, Volvo and Land Rover vehicles, from passenger vehicles to commercial truck ranges, Ford also has an engine plant in Port Elizabeth, which is the company’s global producer of the 1.3-litre RoCam engine which it exports together with the 1.6-litre RoCam engine to Ford plants in India and Europe.The company also uses its Port Elizabeth plant to manufacture catalytic converters for export, with Ford pointing out that South Africa had become a centre of excellence in the field, with the city acting as a hub for the catalytic coverter industry.“This announcement further highlights South Africa’s capabilities in an increasingly competitive global market,” said Feder. “The automotive sector plays an important role in the South African economy and we will continue to develop our significance both locally and as a strategic export base for vehicles, engines and components for Ford Motor Company.”SAinfo reporter Would you like to use this article in your publicationor on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

100 days: Joburg shows its 2010 spirit

first_img2 March 2010Johannesburg residents took a break from their busy schedules, donned their Bafana Bafana jerseys and kicked back with the rest of the country on Tuesday to celebrate the 100 days countdown to the 2010 Fifa World Cup.BuaNews spoke to some of the South Africans who gathered at the 100 days countdown celebration on Maude Street, Sandton, on Tuesday.Thami Makhaya, wearing his Bafana jersey and sporting a vuvuzela, spoke of the long road to 2010, beginning with the country winning the bid in 2004 to host the World Cup.“This World Cup will unite this country,” Makhaya said. “I think once people realise just how big this event is, they will look beyond the differences and unite as South Africans to show the world what we can offer as a nation.“We have travelled a long journey as a country, and this is an opportunity to take yet another step forward.”The Khan family of four, who where dressed up for the occasion, said they came to Maude Street to support their country.“It is important for us be part of this historic occasion … All of Africa is supporting South Africa,” said Suraya Khan. “The World Cup is already a success, because it has shown that Africa is capable.”2010 will undoubtedly go down in the history books as one of the country’s most memorable moments, she said.For Josef Mkhabinde, the World Cup is about the legacy it will leave behind. “It’s what Africa has been dreaming about … I approach the tournament with confidence. Our stadiums are ready, our transport and security plans have been fine-tuned.“I can assure you we will not disappoint,” Mkhabinde said, “because we are a loving nation.”The world will descend on South African shores on 11 June – more than six years after the country was chosen as hosts – to witness the world’s greatest sporting event being held on African soil for the first time.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Ghana’s world first in legal timber

first_img(Image: Wikipedia)New laws should be in place in Europe by the end of 2010 obliging timber importers to ensure the wood they buy has been legally produced – and Ghana will become the first exporting country to be able to offer such a guarantee.The timber trade is a huge business. In Cameroon, where timber exports rank second only to oil in value, it is worth more than US$700-million a year. Indonesia earns nearly $3-billion a year from wood and wood products, but Greenpeace says that as much of 80% of the logging in Indonesia is illegal.It is more than seven years since the European Union adopted a Forest Law Enforcement, Governance and Trade (Flegt, PDF, 1 MB) action plan. Negotiations have been grinding on ever since, both in Brussels, and between the EU and supplier countries. But last week an update meeting in London heard that a compromise text of the new legislation had been drafted and would probably be adopted by the end of the year.The key element is an obligation for importers to show “due diligence” – to prove that they have taken all reasonable care to ensure they are not buying illegal timber. What is or is not legal will be left to the producing countries; if the timber is produced according to local laws and regulations, the EU will accept it.And since the importers can hardly be expected to go and poke about in tropical forests themselves to see where their wood is coming from, the EU is negotiating VPAs – voluntary partnership agreements – with its traditional suppliers.Ghana was the first country to sign and ratify a VPA. By the beginning of next year it should be selling licensed timber under Flegt. Any importer who buys it will automatically be considered to have fulfilled the due diligence obligation.Pilots for the new Flegt assurance scheme have already started in Ghana, with inspectors out in the forest armed with tags and handheld GPS and barcode scanners.Patrick Newton, who is developing the necessary software for a company called Helveta, described how bar-coded tags would be put on standing trees, and more would go on the logs cut from those trees. Between the sawmill and the ship, consignments would be reconciled by volume and by species, and the system would then generate a Flegt-compliant export licence.“The buyer will be able to look all the way up the supply chain from the point of export,” Newton told the meeting, “all the way back up the chain to the forest where that timber came from.”Kingsley Bekoe, a forestry specialist with Ghanaian NGO Civic Response, stressed how important the agreement is to the country: “Almost 60% of our timber exports are to the EU market. If you don’t sign this agreement, I guess you will increasingly lose out.“The market is starting to ask for legal timber. It’s Europe and also the US but other markets are getting increasingly interested in this. So if you don’t enter that agreement you will gradually be losing your market share.”With Ghana, Cameroon and the Republic of Congo were in the first group to sign up. Negotiations are ongoing with Malawi, Indonesia, Liberia and the Central African Republic. Gabon, the DR Congo and Vietnam have asked to start the process.Each agreement will be different. Any VPA with Vietnam, for instance, will have to take into account the fact that it imports most of its timber and makes furniture to sell to the EU and Japan.“There’s no blueprint,” Matthieu Bousquet of the European Commission told the meeting. “No hard and fast rules, no absolute recipe.”Illegal logging fearsBut John Palmer of the Forest Management Trust was critical: “These agreements are now moving into states where the law is little understood,” he told the meeting.“And as you demand more and more documentation, you will get any kind of documentation you are prepared to pay for. It’s a simplistic assumption that everyone is basically working in the same direction. Illegal logging is hugely profitable; there’s a lot of money involved.”London-based campaign group Global Witness agrees. “This can curb illegal logging to a certain extent,” said its forestry expert, Reiner Tegtmeyer. “But only when the structures are in place to be sure that the certificates issued are not just paper. We have always said that independent monitoring is essential.”Illegal logging has been a source of funds for conflict and destabilisation, most notoriously during Liberia’s civil war. With Charles Taylor’s rebels in control of the densely wooded southeast of the country and the port of Buchanan, timber was one of their main sources of income.After Taylor became president, he continued to divert timber revenues for his own purposes – Global Witness believes that by 2000 around $100-million a year was unaccounted for. Because of fears that it was being used to fund conflicts elsewhere in the region, the UN imposed sanctions on the country’s timber exports.Those sanctions have now been lifted, but Liberia is struggling to re-establish its logging industry. Victoria Cole of the country’s Forest Development Authority says she is worried the Flegt process is being pushed ahead too fast, and that her country does not have the capacity to implement it.“If I show you a piece of wood,” she said, “and say this bit of wood is legal, then what makes it legal? People have to understand.”In Liberia, legality would mean that the concession had been awarded by competitive bidding, that the company treats its workers fairly and fulfils its obligation to the local community, that it only cuts mature trees and does not exceed its quota and that it has paid all its taxes.But she likes the fact that the EU will base its standard of legality on Liberia’s own laws. “We are the ones to determine it,” she says. “No one is going to determine it for us.”Source: Irin Newslast_img read more

Nguni Juices: a winning local mix

first_imgCreator of Nguni Juices Norman Mpedi in his factory. Workers collect fruit in the veld for processing. The umviyo fruit is rich in vitamin C and fibre. (Images: Norman Mpedi) MEDIA CONTACTS • Norman Mpedi +27 82 267 3053 umviyo@yahoo.co.ukRELATED ARTICLES • Paying it forward with goat farming • Teaching people to work with nature • South African wine farms invest in biodiversity • SA’s burgeoning berry industry Emily van RijswijckThanks to canny survival skills learnt in the bush, former Umkhonto we Sizwe soldier Norman Mpedi has made a drastic career change and launched successful organic juice manufacturing operation Nguni Juices, using wild indigenous fruit harvested in Limpopo and KwaZulu-Natal.It all started when Mpedi could not find work in the South African National Defence Force following the disbanding of Umkhonto we Sizwe. At this stage he often used to think back to times when he and his fellow comrades survived solely on what was available in the Angolan bush. Sometimes this only amounted to edible wild fruits growing in abundance.He recalls: “We ate this fruit, the umviyo, sometimes for up to three weeks at a time and we survived.”Untapped potentialUmviyo is the isiZulu name for the wild medlar or Vangueria infausta, a wild fruit similar to the better-known marula (Sclerocarya caffra) or Mnguni in isiZulu. Nutritionally, it’s as rich in vitamin C and natural fibre as the latter.In juice form it is an almost unrivalled high-energy natural supplement. Knowing this, Mpedi knew there was untapped potential in this source and started to investigate it further.“No-one had this idea before,” he says.This was back in 2003 and Mpedi began tackling the challenges of researching various indigenous fruits and their potential for juicing, and finding financial assistance for his start-up venture. He also had to register his product and patent his juice with the Companies and Intellectual Property Registration Office.With the help of specialists in the field from the University of Johannesburg and Pretoria, his final product was tested for nutritional quality and taste, and finally given the thumbs-up.“All my products are organic and completely free of chemicals,” says proud Mpedi. His products are currently only available at selected tourist and health shops, at some fruit and vegetable outlets and certain petrol stations.Mpedi is still looking for additional capital to fund expansion.RecognitionIn the meantime, his efforts have not gone unnoticed. In February 2011 Mpedi got a personal mention in Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan’s annual budget speech.Gordhan related how Mpedi, Mlondolozi Kosi – with his ICT training centre in Willowvale in the Eastern Cape, and Antonio Pooe – with Exactech Fraud Solutions in Johannesburg, Cape Town and Durban – are small business operators setting an inspiring example for others.“Small businesses are an important source of jobs. Businesses that employ fewer than 50 workers account for 68% of private sector employment,” Gordhan said at the time.Mpedi employs about 12 workers at his factory in Mokopane in Limpopo. As the fruit ripen in summer, his busiest times are from January until March when he employs additional local people to help with harvesting.In 2007 he was a finalist in the small companies category of the Department of Trade and Industry’s Technology Awards, and in 2008 he was recognised by the Industrial Development Corporation for his research on indigenous foods.In the new year Mpedi hopes to branch out into other products, such as alcoholic ciders from the same fruit.In addition to umviyo, he harvests monkey oranges and a plant known as utshwala benyoni, also known as white birds brandy, because when birds eat it they “become very noisy and lively”, Mpedi says.This plant is used as a natural enhancer in the fruit juice as it has a minty flavour.“Next year my business will grow even more, for sure,” he adds.last_img read more

Sports ministry to bring new law on doping in Monsoon Session

first_imgRattled by the doping scandal that has rocked Indian athletics, the Sports Ministry is planning to bring a new law to deal with the menace in the forthcoming Monsoon Session of Parliament.”We are going to the Cabinet in this regard and wish to bring a specific law on doping in the Monsoon Session of Parliament,” said Minister for Sports and Youth Affairs Ajay Maken, on the sidelines of a workshop on population held at Vigyan Bhawan in New Delhi on Monday.”We also want that the WADA norms be applicable to all sports. In case the norms or international sports bodies are different from those of WADA, or are in conflict, then the norms of international sports bodies would be applicable.”When asked about the Board of Control for Cricket in India, which does not adhere to WADA norms on doping, the minister said, “I am not talking about any one sport. This will be made applicable to all sports.””Mostly, the norms of various international sports bodies are in consonance with those of WADA. We expect that all such sports bodies adhere to WADA norms. But in case of a conflict, the norms of international bodies would apply.”On the action taken so far on doping within the country, the minister said, “Whatever it is, now we have asked NIS, SAI and NADA to be more vigilant. I have asked NADA to carry on more surprise checks, increase the frequency and change the dope officers and I am hopeful of positive results.”advertisement”We have already started conducting raids. Surprise checks were carried out on Saturday at NIS in Patiala and such raids are being conducted at Bangalore today. Such raids will be carried out more frequently and wherever dope material is found entering the premises, strict action will be taken.””Already, strict action has been taken against seven officials and Justice Mukul Mudgal has been appointed to carry out a thorough probe. Strict action would taken. We will spare no one.”- With PTI inputslast_img read more