Is this the best wedding ‘selfie’ you’ve ever seen?

first_imgA wedding photo of a priest using a ‘selfie stick’  which captured the happy moment a couple officially said ‘I Do’ has gone viral. Fr. Pat Ward, parish priest in the Kincasslagh/Acres diocese is a hugely popular priest in the locality and beyond.Fr. Pat is renowned for his quick wit and fantastic humour during his wedding sermons. Just moments after Christopher O’Donnell and Sinead O’Donnell tied the knot, he was on hand to make sure he got a ‘selfie’ of the moment.‘I ‘DO’ Wedding DVDS’ Facebook page shared the image on their timeline and the photo has gone viral all over the internet.The happy bride Sinead O’Donnell, also shared the photo recently and wrote, “What a guy Fr. Pat! Love this photo ❤️“Girls, there is a pic of yas in the selfie 😂 Maid and Tracey trying their best to get in it ” It’s not the first time Fr. Pat has created a ‘selfie storm’ – this image (below) of Fr. Pat and a number of other clerics went viral when published a number of years ago!Is this the best wedding ‘selfie’ you’ve ever seen? was last modified: October 3rd, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Sharks’ Evander Kane on Golden Knights: “We know they don’t like us”

first_img(CLICK HERE, if you are unable to view this photo gallery on your mobile device.)SAN JOSE — Sharks forward Evander Kane led the NHL with 153 penalty minutes this season. But on the eve of Game 1 in the first round playoff series between his team and the Vegas Golden Knights, Kane also noted that only 29 of those minutes came at SAP Center.“I just want to be on my best behavior for my hometown fans,” Kane said with a smile Tuesday.Kane, with 30 goals this season, will obviously be of better …last_img read more

In London, voting for South Africa

first_img16 April 2009 Twenty-five years ago, the crowds that gathered in Trafalgar Square to protest and demonstrate against apartheid South Africa played a major role in galvanising international opinion against apartheid and hastening its downfall. Yesterday, South Africans gathered in their thousands in orderly queues to have their say in the future of the democratic South Africa in the same place that the demonstrators once stood. With 7&nbps;427 South African voters marking their crosses in 12 hours, the South African High Commision in London was not only the country’s largest voting station abroad, but was also nearly twice the size of the largest one in South Africa – Joubert Park in Johannesburg with between 3 000 to 4 000 voters, according to the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC). I have never seen such a large group of South Africans behaving in such a subdued manner. Perhaps it had something to do with being in the historic Trafalgar Square on an overcast – and sometimes wet – London spring day. Perhaps it had something to do with the the tiny figure of Lord Nelson on his towering column peering out over Parliament Square, where an animated statue of our own Nelson Mandela is flanked by the likes of Winston Churchill, Margaret Thatcher and General Jan Smuts, the only other South African in the Square. Perhaps, it had to do with the fact that it was very early in the morning. But I suspect it had more to do with the reverence of voting – the universal way for ordinary citizens to have a say in their country and the future. They queued ten-deep across Trafalgar Square and the length of the facade of the iconic South Africa House. It was a day on which South Africans filed onto South African soil in unprecedented numbers thanks to a decision by the Constitutional Court – the cornerstone of South Africa’s democracy – which required government to extend voting facilities to all South Africans abroad who are on the voters roll. They waited quietly, patiently, reading the latest copy of The South African, chatting quietly about why they were in the UK, why they were voting, exchanging their memories, hopes and fears for their beloved country. It also took me back to 1994 when I had felt so priveleged to be part of the first election in which all South Africans were able to vote – most for the first time. The long queues snaked sometimes for kilometres and many South Africans got to know each other for the first time as they waited for hours to make their crosses. Back then it was both a deeply moving , humbling and empowering experience. And so it was again yesterday. This time, the voters were mainly young, mainly white and all were united by the decision to have a say in their country and in choosing the next government. It also took me back to the mid-1980s, when I served as a correspondent for the South African morning group of newspapers – including the Rand Daily Mail and the Cape Times – when I covered almost constant demonstrations and protests by South African exiles and large numbers of committed members of the British public who played such a crucial role in ending apartheid. Seldom in the history of freedom struggles has there been such a display of international solidarity by a nation as was the case with the British public’s involvement in the Anti-Apartheid Movement. Today photographic records of those protests are displayed on the walls of South African House and many famous faces are still recognisable – Thabo Mbeki, the late Harold Wilson, the late Archbishop Trevor Huddleston, Abdul Minty, Peter Hain, the alte Mike Terry and many more. As I stood waiting and chatting to fellow South Africans, I was humbled that we would not be standing there voting in a democratic election in South Africa had it not been for the suffering and sacrifice of thousands of South Africans in resisting apartheid for all those years . Many gave their lives, many sacrificed family members and friends. I was overcome by a deep humility tinged with pride. John Battersby is UK Country Manager of the International Marketing Council of South Africa and former editor of the Sunday Independent.last_img read more

Model ‘green’ car in SA for World Cup

first_imgXavier van Stappen is inside his car. (Image: Bongani Nkosi) Xavier van Stappen’s rather unconventional model electrical car, which he designed and drove from Europe to Africa before the 2010 Fifa World Cup, is helping raise awareness about alternative forms of energy and environmentally harmful carbon emissions.The French Belgian, who designed the three-wheel prototype in his home country, crossed 25 countries in Europe and Africa to get to the host nation, South Africa, in time for kick-off on 11 June.He set off in Copenhagen, in Denmark, and drove for four months to reach Ghana, just days before the tournament began. He then promptly disassembled the vehicle and flew with it to South Africa.“We flew from Ghana to South Africa just to be on time for the World Cup,” Van Stappen said at a press briefing in Pretoria on 7 July.During his overland trip he crossed Belgium, The Netherlands, France, Spain, Morocco, Senegal, Burkina Faso and Mauritania, among others.Travel by road began again in Johannesburg when Van Stappen started his next leg of the journey – this time to Cape Town. The inventor has been travelling with Vincent Pierart, who’s been filming the expedition for a website.The two-seater vehicle, which Van Stappen always describes as a prototype, is essentially a modified tricycle that’s shaped like a bullet. It relies solely on solar energy to move and can reach speeds of 110km/hour. “But I never drive so fast,” he quipped.It has a 10-year lifespan and is recyclable, according to Van Stappen.Van Stappen’s 12 000km journey to South Africa, which he planned to coincide with the World Cup, is promoting the use of “green” technology to create energy and contributing to the global campaign against biodegradation.“Nowadays we have a problem with petrol. It’s expensive and it produces pollution,” he said.Using only the sun’s rays to power the vehicle means that it makes no carbon emissions at all. “We have to adopt new ways of producing energy,” Van Stappen said.He believes that all electrical cars should be three-wheelers, because this keeps them light. Today’s conventional cars “are over-equipped” and consume a lot of energy, he said. Making electrical cars with four wheels defeats the objective of lightness, he adds.Although the first electrical car was manufactured in 1899, the market remains small. Van Stappen believes mass production will boost the industry and create more options for buyers. “[Consumers] are ready to buy it in many countries … [they] have the power to buy whatever they want.“During my trip I’ve met many people who are interested in the project.”Promoting the technology in AfricaVan Stappen’s prototype has been exhibited in all 25 countries it passed through, and is currently on show at the Allandale Business Park in Midrand, Johannesburg.One of the vehicle’s overriding characteristics is its very basic chassis, which Van Stappen disjointed with students at a technical college in Dakar, Senegal, to demonstrate its simplicity. Because the design is so uncomplicated, the students were later able to rejoin the chassis themselves.“The aim [of the trip] is also to transfer the technology” to the Southern Hemisphere, Van Stappen said.His prototype has even made it onto a football pitch at one of the World Cup stadiums.‘Green’ car for SA soonDuring his stay here Van Stappen visited a private company in Cape Town, Optimal Energy, which is producing South Africa’s first electrical car, the Joule. He said he was impressed by what he saw.Production will begin in 2012, either at a plant in Coega or East London – both industrial areas in the Eastern Cape province . The company hopes to have the vehicle ready for sale by 2013.“It’s great that [South Africa] is a country that’s producing an electrical car for its local market,” Van Stappen said.The Joule will be a standard four-wheel, five-seater vehicle with a top speed of 135km/h. It will use rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, which are also recyclable.The South African model will be able to run on solar power as well, so one of the optional extras is to have solar panels installed on its rooftop.The first of its kind in the country, the Joule was designed by South African-born Keith Helfet, who’s had a successful career as chief stylist at Jaguar.When not driving or promoting his first three-wheel prototype, Van Stappen works on a second three-wheel car project, the I-CARE 333, which is also biodegradable. He’s hoping that, in time, it will be available on markets across the world.During his stay in South Africa the Belgian designer visited Volkswagen’s plant in the Eastern Cape, and is now is looking for deals to manufacture I-CARE 333 here.last_img read more

Highlights from the North American Passive House Conference

first_imgDynamic modelingDr. Achilles Karagiozis of Owens Corning gave the closing keynote address and did so with his usual smart and funny flair. The first part of his talk was a response to Dr. Lstiburek’s keynote in Denver two years ago, where Lstiburek said that the first passive houses were igloos and that you’re probably doing something wrong if you need to use WUFI.Karagiozis, one of the developers of the WUFI software tool, responded by posing a scenario in which Lstiburek was stranded in Alaska after a helicopter crash and all he had to survive with was his laptop and WUFI. Karagiozis’s hilarious models killed Joe off two or three times before finally getting to an igloo design that worked.The real meat of Karagiozis’s talk came after the funny opening segment, when he began discussing the power of dynamic modeling compared to the static modeling usually done.When you use a tool like REM/Rate (the main home energy rating software) or PHPP (the spreadsheet modeling tool created by the German Passive House Institute), you get results for one particular set of conditions. You enter things like heating degree days and outdoor design temperatures and get numbers for how well the house performs… at those particular conditions. As the temperature and rainfall and cloudiness vary, however, from hour to hour and day to day, your model doesn’t tell you what’s happening unless you change the numbers and run it again.The German Passivhaus program relies on the static modeling of PHPP. PHIUS is still certifying projects using PHPP, but passive house consultants certified through PHIUS can choose to use WUFI Passive as an alternate modeling tool.OK, this is going deeper than I planned but you have to know something about modeling landscape to understand Karagiozis’s point. So, last year I took the WUFI 1-D class and learned a little about one-dimensional hygrothermal modeling. Briefly, it’s a way of modeling the heat and moisture flows through a building assembly. You put in the assembly details and the indoor and outdoor conditions, and then run it for whatever period of time you choose.WUFI Passive does the modeling for a whole building enclosure, assembly by assembly. It also incorporates the requirements of the Passivhaus standard so you know if the modeled home meets the requirements for certification. It’s a nice tool, and Karagiozis has great confidence in it. “I have not seen a more accurate simulation of indoor conditions than using WUFI Passive,” he said during his keynote. RELATED ARTICLES A Passivhaus Conference in Germany Joseph Lstiburek Surprises Passive House Conference AttendeesNew Passive Building Standards for North America New climate-specific standardsGraham Wright, PHIUS senior scientist, revealed the latest evolution of PHIUS’s new climate-specific standards in his talk on the first morning of the main conference. The first room he was scheduled in was way too small because this was where everyone wanted to be, so we moved back to the room where Bill Rose had recently finished giving the opening keynote presentation.Wright’s presentation (pdf) was composed of 80 slides that averaged probably more than 100 words per slide. As you might suspect, it was not a presentation to be digested and understood by the end of his 80 minutes unless, say, you’re on the PHIUS technical committee and helped do a lot of the background work. I’ve got a copy of the presentation and am slowly working my way towards a bit of a grasp of the ideas. Never having gone through the passive house training makes it more difficult. (Katrin Klingenberg gave an introduction to the standards changes a few months ago here on Green Building Advisor.)Let me try to give you a quick summary of some of the main points Wright made.Motivation: “We’re proceeding the way we are because, as experience has accumulated in different climate zones, the facts obliged us to.”Certification: Still performance based, still pass/fail.The three pillars. PHIUS is going to stick with the three main components of PH certification: airtightness, source energy, space conditioning.Airtightness: Changing from air changes per hour at 50 Pascals to cfm50/square foot of building enclosure area. The threshold will be ~0.05 cfm50/sf. (I love this change volume is the wrong metric to use here.)ERV/HRV rating protocol. Changing the “12% deduction” to other adjustments. (I have little knowledge of this one, so I can’t really say anything about it.)Source energy. Making some changes to how the calculations are done here. For more details, see the report when it’s released.Lighting and plug loads. Adjusting upward because PHPP model was too low. “Intolerable, must fix,” according to Wright’s slide.Economics. This was one of the main issues. 4.75 kBtu/sf/yr is supposed to be the economic optimum, but actual cost-effectiveness results were one of “the facts [that] obliged [PHIUS] to” look for alternatives. The variation of degree days and design temperatures through different climate zones is part of the problem here. Failure of “tunneling through the cost barrier” was another.That last point launched the tech committee’s efforts to find out what might be the best way to do this. Building Science Corporation, with funding from the DOE’s Building America program, has been helping with this work as they’ve looked at BEopt models of passive buildings in different climates.The goal of that work is to find the real optimum in cost-effectiveness. And then go beyond it. Wright’s reason for going beyond the optimum was, “Because that’s our schtick.” I’m not sure how much sense it makes to find the minimum and then go beyond it, but hey, that’s what the upcoming member comment period is for, I guess. As he pointed out in his summary, though, the goal here is “to avoid pushing people way out into diminishing returns.” Perhaps they’re following the 12-step program guideline here: Progress, not perfection.From my layperson’s vantage point, the direction they’re going with this is a good one. Martin Holladay, the Energy Nerd here at GBA, brilliantly exposed the problem with diminishing returns of Passivhaus levels of insulation with a little drawing he did a few years ago.The seven 2-inch thick sheets of under-slab insulation shown in Image #4 below will save a lot more energy when spread across seven houses than when put in one thick pile below one house. It’s not a perfect takedown, however, because those other six houses probably aren’t going to get that insulation anyway. If they do, the contrast is different.According to an update on Twitter by my friend Peter Troast, Dr. Wolfgang Feist responded to the idea of climate-specific passive house standards by saying that the physics is the same everywhere so having a single, uniform standard is fine. It’s certainly true that physics doesn’t change, but conditions change, needs change, and cost-effectiveness changes. If it were really so simple, why would ASHRAE and building codes put so much effort into developing climate zones? (Jim Meyers in Colorado made that point on Twitter yesterday, too.) Great peopleBefore I start telling you why the conference was so great, though, let me remind you that I’m on the board of directors for PHIUS. But don’t think that means I’m saying all this is great because I’m on the board. It’s actually the other way around. The 9th annual North American Passive House Conference happened two weeks ago in the San Francisco Bay Area of California. The Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS) has been holding this conference every year since 2006, and it just keeps getting better.I’ve been to the last three now, and it’s one of my favorite events of the year, right up there with Building Science Summer Camp (Dr. Joe Lstiburek’s conference) and Possum Drop (the New Year’s Eve party I go to each year in Georgia). This year’s conference seemed especially good because of the direction PHIUS is taking the passive house movement in North America.center_img During the preconference sessions, I got to spend some time with my friend Jeff Reilich from Chapel Hill, North Carolina. (I don’t know if I mentioned it here before, but he’s the one who once worked on a house with an 8,000 cfm range hood!) We even took off for a while one day and drove over to the ocean and the next day went up to San Rafael to see John Proctor. Not part of the NAPHC, I know, but still a nice part of the overall experience. Plus, Proctor even invited us up into his attic to see his secret lab (photo below). Every secret lab needs a nice oriental rug, you know!I think it was Jeff who said the folks at the NAPHC are the smartest and most dedicated building science folks he spends time with. During one of the sessions at last year’s conference, Joe Lstiburek leaned over to me and said, “I really like this club.”I’ve felt the same thing, and so did many others who attended this year or years past. The folks involved with this movement are doing amazing work. Great timesSo another edition of the North American Passive House Conference has come and gone. (Another conference this year, unfortunately, adopted the same name PHIUS has been using for nine years. I’m sure Martin Holladay will be writing about that one soon, since he was there.) A lot of the great building science minds were at the conference in California, and I got to go, too. It was nice catching up with old friends like Dan Perunko, Gavin Healy, and J. West (who gave a great Judas Priest karaoke performance!) and meeting a lot of new folks. It was also nice to see Bronwyn Barry of the North American Passive House Network there and meet her in real life for the first time.The venue was great! We were right across the water from the San Francisco airport, and I watched with amazement as planes took off and landed without hitting the seawall and skidding across the runway. I did see one Korean Air jet get to within 100 meters or so of the ground and then pull up and abort that attempt. Not sure what happened but they landed safely about 10 minutes later.There was much more to the conference than I’ve covered here, of course. Kat Klingenberg gave a broader overview in her blog recently. One thing she covered that I didn’t was Bill Rose’s opening keynote. He gave a sweeping review of how we got here and discussed activism, the Vietnam War, and even managed to work in a bit about abortion, making the point that we need to be able to discuss rationally things that aren’t easy to talk about. He also touched on one of my favorite topics, peak oil, and reminded me that I need to bring that back into my presentations.The PHIUS staff deserves a lot of praise for pulling this off because organizing and running a conference this big takes a lot of work. I appreciate the long hours, late nights, and early mornings they put in.I’d especially like to thank Kat Klingenberg. Without her, there might be a little bit of passive house activity in North America, but I doubt it would be anything like what we have. Now we’ve got two organizations, two conferences, a lot of activity, and some serious innovation happening. I don’t know all the details about what happened leading up to the split with PHI, but I do know that I’ve been thoroughly impressed with Kat. She understands the issues. She works hard. And she’s willing to admit when she’s made a mistake.The passive house movement is probably the most exciting area to work in the field of building science. When you push out to the edge to see just how far you can go — or should go — it’s possible to make progress that could hardly be imagined before.See you in Chicago next year! Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, energy consultant, RESNET-certified trainer, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. Check out his in-depth course, Mastering Building Science at Heatspring Learning Institute, and follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard.last_img read more

The One Area Where It Really Pays to Be Different

first_imgIt is important to be different in a way that makes a difference. There are all kinds of differentiation strategies. You can differentiate by having the lowest price as a way to attract customers who only perceive price as value. You can differentiate by having a better product, with features and benefits that are far beyond your competition, differentiating on what makes you unique. There are strategies for explaining why what you sell is different and how your clients benefit from those differences, and they can help you win business.As beneficial as those differences are, there is one area where it is even more important to be different, and that area is salesmanship.There is a reason why salespeople who have higher prices and who do not have the very best product or service win business. Most of the time, that reason is that they are better at selling than the salespeople and sales organizations against whom they compete for business.If you want to tilt the playing field in your direction, the most important differentiation is within your control. You can:Improve your willingness and your ability to create new opportunities by spending more time refining your approach to prospecting. The commitment for time is now one of the most difficult commitments to gain, and those who outperform here generally outperform when it comes to their overall results. No deal is closed that is not first opened, and creating opportunities is part of salesmanship. This is a critical differentiation strategy.Your business acumen and your situational knowledge is now a defining differentiator when it comes to salesmanship. It is the “advice” half of the two-part recipe that makes one a “trusted advisor,” with “trust” being the other half. If you want to be different, investing here provides exceptional returns. It isn’t all that difficult to develop in this area. You need only to read, study, and interview people who know more than you, take account of what you know, and develop a few themes. It’s easy to create a gap here if you are willing to work while your peer group plays.Knowing how to sell is a differentiator, and it produces an enormous difference in your results. If you want clients to see and acknowledge a difference, you need to be able to help them identify the reasons they should change, understand how they should change, what trade-offs they may need to consider, and know what commitments they need to make to further the process of change to pull yourself out of the pack.There is a reason that some salespeople do tremendously well while selling commodities and other salespeople struggle even when they have an offering that is clearly differentiated and superior to the alternatives. As much as you may want to believe that the product, service, or solution is what needs to be different, the real differentiator is salesmanship. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

‘Gau rakshaks’ create mayhem at Bhubaneswar railway station

first_imgA group of self-proclaimed ‘gau rakshaks’ created mayhem at the Bhubaneswar railway station on Wednesday, attacking two persons who were legally transporting 20 milch cows. No arrests have been made so far.The attack took place around 9.30 a.m. when a Noida-based dairy farm was transporting 20 milch cows from Salem in Tamil Nadu to Meghalaya in two parcel vans of the Kochuveli-Guwahati Express. The dairy employees had all the legal documents with them.When the train arrived in Bhubaneshwar, more than 25 cow vigilantes barged into the station and caught hold of two persons belonging to dairy and beat them up.The miscreants, who claimed to be members of the Bajrang Dal, even tied up the two employees. It is alleged that nobody from the security establishments tried to detain the attackers even though they gave interviews to local television channels, bragging about their deed.The train was detained for two hours and the two men were rescued by RPF personnel nearly an hour after the attack.Soubhagya Kumar Swain, inspector-in-charge of GRP, Bhubaneswar, said: “There were only four to five security personnel and they could not control the mob.”Later, the station superintendent lodged a complaint with GRP stating 25 unknown persons carried out the attack. “We have no idea of the attackers. We are examining CCTV footage to identify them,” said Mr. Swain.last_img read more

Robinson’s crusade: Coach Topex says journey to PBA sometimes take long route

first_imgRobinson had the opportunity to mentor some of this year’s PBA hopefuls and took the time to share his story.“I was telling them that whatever the result of this draft is, it should not be the end of your story as a basketball player,” he told the Inquirer.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chief“It’s gonna be hard, realistically it’s hard,” he told the applicants. “But the question is yours to answer: How much do you want this dream to become a reality? It’s all gonna depend on you.”Robinson should know what he speaks of. He was part of the 2001 PBA draft that featured the likes of Mark Caguioa, Willie Miller and Roger Yap. Playing out of San Sebastian, he was picked in the fifth round. Generika-Ayala caps return to spotlight with third-place finish Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lacson: 2019 budget delay due to P75-B House ‘insertion’ SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games openingcenter_img SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completion Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netTopex Robinson had a little message for PBA Draft applicants during the draft combine on Thursday.Don’t lose faith. Sometimes, the road to one’s dreams is longer than expected.ADVERTISEMENT Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting “I was drafted 44th (overall), I was not even signed,” he said.  “I went on to float for two years before I was given a chance.”Robinson eventually made the pros, making stops at Red Bull, Purefoods, and Alaska—he won two titles and earned an inclusion to the All-Defensive team along the way.Robinson currently is the head coach of Lyceum in the NCAA.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more